Visit Each Others Gardens

  • January 14 · 12:00 PM
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This event is cancelled-consult  the1/31/15 event for next visit to someone's garden

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  • Verlinda M.

    I'll be there after work sooo 8 pm?

    December 11

    • Bill C.

      Sure!! Come on by...

      December 17

  • Mechele W.

    Lots of great info and tips Bill, thanks for posting! I hope you will upload some pics on the message board too. (Under the "Discussion" tab at the top of the page.) I am slowly transitioning to as many TN native plants as I can. Like you I had a good bit of damage from last winter on ligustrum, vitex, pyracantha and others but no noticeable problems on any of my natives. That isn't the primary reason I want to grow native plants but it certainly is something in their favor. I like your tip about trimming back container grown plants. That is also a good idea in many cases if you plant bare root trees or shrubs because those items have lost part of their roots in the process of being dug up and prepared for shipping. Sometimes on those items the nursery will trim the tops back before packaging but not always.

    June 15

  • Bill C.

    PART SIX: Things that have worked well: double Knockout roses (be sure to spray for diseases a couple of times a year). I planted 35 knockout roses along a chain link fence and they have grown like weeds. They are about four + feet tall after two years. Hibiscus and irises have done well and they even make it look like I know what I’m doing (as opposed to azaleas). As for trees, my apple, peach, pear, cherry, pecan, mimosa, crabapple and magnolia trees are alive and well. I have a flower bed of wildflowers that does well every year. You have to seed the wildflowers in the fall because they need to be in the ground and be exposed to a certain number of “below freezing” days in the winter or they won’t germinate as well in the spring. Hope this helps someone. Now you know everything I know. Regards to all,
    -Bill.

    June 15

  • Bill C.

    PART FIVE: Things that have NOT worked well: Azaleas. Gardenias or sweet olive trees or Indian hawthorne bushes or distyllium bushes mainly due to this past hard winter. Also; my laurels and ligustrums got hit hard this past winter….both are evergreen and they survived, but had a lot of dead branches/leaves from the severe cold. I learned that just because the nursery sells something in Tennessee doesn’t mean it grows in Tennessee. I planted three dogwoods and they keep getting a fungus every spring. I spray them and the fungus goes away, but I lost one dogwood because I didn’t catch the fungus in time. I read in one of my books that there is a fungus in the US that is killing off a lot of dogwood trees…so spray them as soon as the leaves come out and don’t wait for the fungus. I have four “Jane’s Magnolias” that get a fungus every spring.

    June 15

  • Bill C.

    PART FOUR
    Watering: One of my gardening books had a good tip about the importance of watering a bush or tree the first year after you plant it. The book said you need to water a couple of times a week the first year after you plant a bush because when you buy a bush or tree at a nursery, it has been watered twice a day, fertilized regularly and has generally been babied its whole life. Due to all the fertilizing and watering at the nursery, the top of the plant is out of proportion to the root in the pot, meaning once you put the plant in the ground, sometimes the roots can’t support the plant unless you treat the plant the same way they did at the nursery and you need to water regularly the 1st year until the roots catch up with the “above ground” part of the plant. The author even suggested trimming the bush back about 1/3 when you plant it because the root is not big enough to support the plant.

    1 · June 15

  • Bill C.

    PART THREE The road is banked in front of my house and I planted 35 azaleas on the road bank…I think about ten of them were still alive after two years and I had to dig up the survivors and move them elsewhere in my yard. I have since planted junipers and hollies and arborvitaes on the road bank to replace the ill-fated azaleas and they look like they’re going to make it. Clay soil doesn’t drain well because it is not porous. You dig a hole and plant something in clay, you’re basically planting it in a bowl. Not many plants survive when their roots are constantly waterlogged. I have a friend who planted a row of bushes down a slope and the soil was clay. He dug a trench all the way down the slope and planted his bushes along the trench and filled the trench with different dirt (not clay) so the soil would drain..pretty extreme measure, but it worked for him. That’s all I know about dirt.

    June 15

  • Bill C.

    PART TWO

    Other city libraries may do the same thing. The most useful book I have is the “Southern Living Garden book”. Also; Lowes and Home Depot mark down their plants sometime in November. Soil: I have three, distinct kinds of soil in my yard: clay, regular old dirt (I call it) and I have a corner lot so next to the streets in front and on the side of my house is “road fill” dirt which is not very good dirt (mostly rocks and gravel).
    I learned some hard lessons about planting next to the street in that road fill dirt. Best advice I got about planting anything in the “road fill” dirt was that junipers and most types of evergreens will grow in almost any kind of dirt. If junipers and pines and cedars can grow on a mountainside (like in the Rocky Mountains, not the Smoky mountains) with little or no dirt; and dirt on a mountainside is pretty bad dirt at that, then they will grow in that sorry road fill dirt they use for a road bed.

    June 15

  • Bill C.

    Posting this is multiple parts so as to stay under the 1,000 character limit.

    PART ONE

    Hello fellow gardeners;

    I started landscaping my yard a few years ago and will share some of my successes and failures (a bit embarrassing) in hopes that it helps some of you. First thing I did was try to plan the landscape (which it sounds like Jennie is doing). I would check out some landscaping books from the library. Also; the Brentwood library has used book sales three or four times a year and they usually have a good selection of landscaping books (hardcover books are $2). I’ve bought several over the last couple of years. At the Brentwood library, go to the front circulation desk and they have info about when these used book sales occur (or call them, I guess). Nothing wrong with the books, it’s just the library gets new books and they have to periodically sell off some old books to make room for the new ones.

    June 15

  • A former member
    A former member

    I moved to a new place in Murfreesboro in September. My yard had no landscaping whatsoever. I am working on creating my yard and would welcome any ideas or suggestions. I have full afternoon sun in the front and a lit of shade in the back. Lots of mature trees and a weedy lawn. Its a challenge I am up for. Love gardening plants and veggies.

    June 12

  • Philip

    I invite everyone to come out to my place and share in the joys of pulling weeds in my garden. Anytime works for me. 24/7.
    ; )

    January 1, 2014

  • Debbie C.

    I live in Franklin. My garden is more of the vegetable/herb type. Weekends will probably be best.

    December 10, 2013

    • Debbie C.

      I also want to mention that I have a huge interest in organic gardening. I do not use chemicals other than occasional (rare) neem oil. I'm happy to share my knowledge with others and would love to learn your ideas for sustainable gardening too!

      December 10, 2013

  • Angie O.

    I have recently moved to southern Murfreesboro and would love some input and ideas of ways to help me transition from a yard with lots of planting areas to container planting. My only planting area at my new home is on the north side.
    I would love to get together with some fellow gardeners. Weekends are not usually good for me. Same with Tuesdays. However, I am in town and available the weekend of Nov. 16

    November 4, 2013

  • Nancy

    Krystal, I am not going to be able to meet this weekend. I have some cleanup work to do after the heavy rain yesterday. We can reschedule but I am not sure when at this time. Thank you for your initiative.

    August 9, 2013

    • Krystal

      That actually works out for me. Due to the rain pushing back schedules, I am going to have some contractors over this weekend. Maybe another weekend.

      August 9, 2013

  • Krystal

    Hi! I received the email from Mechele, but I hate sending separate emails. As posted earlier, I am available this weekend. I like in the Inglewood/East Nashville area. Does anyone else want to participate in this meet-and-greet, or slate it for a different weekend?

    1 · August 9, 2013

  • Mechele W.

    Krystal, Marie and Nancy, I just sent you 3 an email!

    August 6, 2013

  • Mechele W.

    Krystal and Nancy, do one of you want to suggest a date?

    July 31, 2013

    • Krystal

      Friday, August 9, early August 10, or August 11

      August 1, 2013

  • Krystal

    Hi, all! I just moved to East Nashville/Inglewood area and I am anxious to get started on landscaping! I'm new to zone 6 having lived all my life in Phoenix, AZ; quite a different perspective in gardening in a place that rains so much! I could definitely use suggestions/ideas for how to plant a vegetable garden and spruce up my front lawn for curb appeal. I am available every afternoon/evening except for Tuesdays and am also free on the weekends. I also love to entertain, so having a few friends over to drink and garden outdoors sounds great to me!

    1 · July 31, 2013

  • Nancy

    Thank you Mechele for this suggestion. I love to get ideas from other gardeners and view their creativity. I have a small urban garden in Donelson with a wide variety of flowers and weeds and an underground critter that has eaten roots from my roses and an azalea -destroying them. I still manage to get compliments from the neighbors, so it's not too bad. I am available some evenings, Saturdays, and Sunday afternoons. Many flowers are already bloomed out and I am starting to get some white mold on my coneflowers. My mammoth hibiscus should be in bloom soon though!

    1 · July 5, 2013

  • Mechele W.

    I'm in Murfreesboro, just outside the city limits on the SE side. My garden is definitely a work in progress, not very professional or tidy. But I pledge lots of annual Black Eyed Susan seeds to anyone that wants to come over. And I would love for somebody to look at it and give me some ideas for adding a water feature. I work Saturdays but I am off sometimes on Sundays.

    July 5, 2013

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