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Meetup in December

Hello Book lovers,

We selected our books for the December meeting – the last meeting of 2012!

“The Art of Fielding” written by Chad Harbach
“Autumn Laing” written by Alex Miller

If you have time you can read both books, otherwise you can select the book you are most interested in.

The Around Fitzroy & Collingwood Book Club is very informal; there is no set meeting agenda. Over a coffee, beer or wine, we usually have a chat about what everyone thought of the books of the month and see if anyone has read anything else exciting or heard of any great literary events on in Melbourne.

“The Art of Fielding” written by Chad Harbach
Chad Harbach makes the case for baseball, thrillingly, in his slow, precious and altogether excellent first novel, “The Art of Fielding.” If it seems a stretch for a baseball novel to hold truth and beauty and the entire human condition in its mitt, well, “The Art of Fielding” isn’t really a baseball novel at all, or not only. The novel centers on the Westish College Harpooners, a Division III team from the Wisconsin side of Lake Michigan that sees its fortunes rise and then rise some more with the arrival of a nearly magical young shortstop named Henry Skrimshander. Henry is an infield savant, scrawny but supremely gifted, and by his junior year he’s chasing records and being scouted by the majors as a top draft prospect. Then, in the baseball equivalent of a werewolf movie, it all goes terribly wrong:
Measured against other big, ambitious debuts by striving young writers (Harbach is a founder and editor of the literary magazine n+1), “The Art of Fielding” is surprisingly old-fashioned and almost freakishly well behaved.

“Autumn Laing” written by Alex Miller
The Heide mythos, which has grown from the circle that gathered around arts patrons Sunday and John Reed at their home in Victoria’s Yarra Valley, is a tantalising mix of passion, vision, heartbreak, betrayal and great art. Sunday Reed nurtured, inspired and infuriated successive generations of artists and poets from the ’30s to the ’70s. Enter Autumn Laing, the eponymous heroine of Alex Miller’s new novel, based on Reed. It’s 1991 and she is 85 years old, living alone at Old Farm amid the ghosts of the past. She’s in a rage fuelled by self-disgust at her frailties, a pesky biographer, an uncomprehending doctor and an impertinent nurse. Autumn is writing her account of her affair with Pat Donlon and of the damage done to his wife, Edith. It’s a bruisingly moral tale.

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  • A former member
    A former member

    Pretty cool. My first book club meeting ever and I really enjoyed it. Great group of people!

    December 16, 2012

  • Marilia

    Autumn laing - great suggestion and Highly coincidental that recently I visited heide 1-3 and I'm currently reading Sundays garden :-)

    December 9, 2012

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