August Book Club Meeting

From: Nerida
Sent on: Sunday, August 15, 2010 11:36 PM
Hello everyone,

For the next meeting we have two nominated classic and popular books to read and discuss;

?Hard Times? written by Charles Dickens
?Wuthering Heights? written by Emily Bronte

If you have time and energy, you can read both books, otherwise you can select the book you are most interested in.

The meeting is 2pm on Sat 28 August at Grumpy?s Green Caf?.

The Around Fitzroy & Collingwood Book Club is very informal, there is no set meeting agenda. Over a coffee, beer or wine, we usually have a chat about what everyone thought of the book of the month and see if anyone has read anything else exciting or heard of any great literary events on in Melbourne.

?Hard Times? written by Charles Dickens

Novel by Charles Dickens, published in serial form (as Hard Times: For These Times) in the periodical Household Words from April to August Novel by Charles Dickens, published in serial form (as Hard Times: For These Times) in the periodical Household Words from April to August 1854 and in book form later the same year. The novel is a bitter indictment of industrialization, with its dehumanizing effects on workers and communities in mid-19th-century England. Louisa and Tom Gradgrind have been harshly raised by their father, an educator, to know nothing but the most factual, pragmatic information. Their lives are devoid of beauty, culture, or imagination, and the two have little or no empathy for others. Louisa marries Josiah Bounderby, a vulgar banker and mill owner. She eventually leaves her husband and returns to her father's house. Tom, unscrupulous and vacuous, robs his brother-in-law's bank. Only after these crises does their father realize that the principles by which he raised his children have corrupted their lives.


?Wuthering Heights? written by Emily Bronte

Published in 1847, WUTHERING HEIGHTS was not well received by the reading public, many of whom condemned it as sordid, vulgar, and unnatural--and author Emily Bronte went to her grave in 1848 believing that her only novel was a failure. It was not until 1850, when WUTHERING HEIGHTS received a second printing with an introduction by Emily's sister Charlotte, that it attracted a wide readership. And from that point the reputation of the book has never looked back. Today it is widely recognized as one of the great novels of English literature.

Even so, WUTHERING HEIGHTS continues to divide readers. It is not a pretty love story; rather, it is swirling tale of largely unlikeable people caught up in obsessive love that turns to dark madness. It is cruel, violent, dark and brooding, and many people find it extremely unpleasant. And yet--it possesses a grandeur of language and design, a sense of tremendous pity and great loss that sets it apart from virtually every other novel written.

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy