Dim Sum and then some @ Oriental Pearl (Chamblee)

  • February 1, 2009 · 11:15 AM
  • This location is shown only to members

Come help ring in the Chinese New Year as we get together for Dim Sum and Then Some. We will be meeting at 11:15 am at an infamous Dim Sum restaurant - Oriental Pearl. In my opinion this place has the best Dim Sum in Atlanta and I've sampled many! We went here last year for the Chinese New Year's festivities and it was lots of fun. We will have a special section reserved for us that will allow everyone to mix and mingle. (I'm trying to work out a deal on drinks). Also, the restaurant is hiring a special Chinese Lion Dance parade to celebrate at the restaurant.

Check out the link below for pics from last year.
www.photoshow.com/watch/Nm6hX6Vj

After lunch and the show at the restaurant we can head out to other festivities in the area. Because this is Dim Sum we will be ordering Friends & Family style and will be splitting the bill evenly among us with drinks separate. With tax and tip the total bill will be less than $20.

Hope you can come join us and help celebrate the Chinese New Year! - Gretchen p.s. Read below to find out why I want to eat lots of seaweed, fish, whole chicken & very long beans, but definitely no Tofu! Background on Chinese New Year
Chinese New Year starts with the New Moon on the first day of the new year and ends on the full moon 15 days later. The 15th day of the new year is called the Lantern Festival, which is celebrated at night with lantern displays and children carrying lanterns in a parade. The Chinese calendar is based on a combination of lunar and solar movements. The lunar cycle is about 29.5 days, with an extra month inserted every few years to "catch up" with the solar calendar. This is why the CNY falls on a different date each year. New Year's Eve and New Year's Day are celebrated as a family affair, a time of reunion and thanksgiving. The celebration was traditionally highlighted with a religious ceremony given in honor of Heaven and Earth, the gods of the household and the family ancestors. Traditional New Year Foods
Probably more food is consumed during the New Year celebrations than any other time of the year. On New Year's Day, the Chinese family will eat a vegetarian dish called jai. Although the various ingredients in jai are root vegetables or fibrous vegetables, many people attribute various superstitious aspects to them: * Lotus seed - signify having many male offspring
* Black moss seaweed - homonym for exceeding in wealth
* Dried bean curd - homonym for fulfillment of wealth and happiness
* Bamboo shoots - a phrase translated means "wishing that everything would be well"
* No Tofu!- is unlucky as it's white and signifies death and misfortune. Other foods include a whole fish, to represent togetherness and abundance, and a chicken for prosperity. The chicken must be presented with a head, tail and feet to symbolize completeness. Noodles should be uncut, as they represent long life. Here's are some links with more information about the Chinese New Year!
http://www.educ.uvic....
http://www.educ.uvic....
http://en.wikipedia.o...

Join or login to comment.

  • Earl

    The food and ambiance were terrific. There was a nice turnout of very nice people. Gretchen did a great job and was a fantastic Hostess.

    February 3, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    My first Dim Sum experience and it was delicious. Now need to work off all this stuff at the gym. Great people too.

    February 2, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    Having Dim Sum during the Chinese new year celebrations made this really special! The chicken feet made it even more special! ;-)

    February 1, 2009

  • Tyler Le

    It was great meeting everyone! I had terrific time showing people new foods.

    February 1, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    Great find Gretchen. I really enjoyed the dragon. Thanks for all you do! anna

    February 1, 2009

  • Deborah

    As always, Gretchen did a great job organizing. Thanks for a fabulous event. Food, company and entertainment was great!

    February 1, 2009

  • daver

    It's my favorite place to have Dim Sum, and it seemed to me as delicious as ever!

    February 1, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    food was great, price was even better. i thought however, the size of our group was too big

    February 1, 2009

  • Nikita "NIKI"

    As always loved seeing everyone, and meeting new people. The dim sum was yummmm.. into my tummy! Thanks to Gretchen again - you are a great host always!!

    February 1, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    This was a good idea. I met new people and had fun.

    February 1, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    Great dim sum and met new people and had fun!

    February 1, 2009

  • A former member
    A former member

    Awesome time! The food and service were excellent. The New Years celebrations were very cool. Thanks for a fun day, Gretchen!

    February 1, 2009

  • Gr8tchen

    Hey Niki! so glad you're joining us! You'll have to help us order the right food so that we have all the best in the New Year! p.s. I'm bringing my last bottle the Pierre Sparr Gewurtz that you like.

    January 31, 2009

  • Nikita "NIKI"

    Auspicious refreshments are also prepared at this time, such as glutinous rice flour pudding (nian-gao), which is said to make people "advance toward higher positions and prosperity step by step." People usually have dumplings (shuei jiao) too, which look like shoe-shaped gold and are supposed to help those who eat them to amass fortunes and wealth.

    January 30, 2009

  • Nikita "NIKI"

    As in all such festivals, food plays an important role throughout the Lunar New Year Festival, and dinners tend to be especially lavish. Many of the dishes made at this time are served because they are regarded as symbols of good luck. For instance, fish (yu) represent "having enough to spare," garlic chives (jiou cai) stand for "everlasting," turnips (cai tou) mean "good omens," and fish balls (yu wan) and meat balls (rou wan) represent "reunion."

    January 30, 2009

  • Gr8tchen

    Directions: P'tree Industrial Road traveling North, TURN RIGHT on Chamblee Dunwoody Road, TURN RIGHT on New Peachtree Road. ORIENTAL PEARL is on the left in the corner of an Asian shopping center. The place will be packed. Good luck parking!!! See you SUNDAY! 5399 New Peachtree Rd Chamblee, GA 30341 [masked]

    January 30, 2009

  • Gr8tchen

    CONFIRMED: Ana, Graham?, Kevin, Developer-Null, Joanna, Ari, Daren, Ivan, Anna+1, Daver, Earl, Kaia, Tuan, Sylvia, Jen, Laura, Dennis, Michael, Meg, Natasha, Deborah, Niki, Amity, Arati, Laura, Andrew. All other RSVP's cleared.

    January 30, 2009

  • Gr8tchen

    Changed RSVP for folks who have not confirmed to WATI LIST. It always gets their attention and then they suddenly confirm. Can't risk having 10 PEOPLE NO SHOW. Gary, Aigool, Alan, Ana, Nicole, Joanna, Olga, Sheryl.

    January 30, 2009

  • Gr8tchen

    Confirmed: Daren, Ivan +1, Earl?, Anna, Kaia, Tuan, Sylvia, Jen, Laura, Dennis, Michael, Meg, Natasha, Deborah, Niki, Amity, Arati, Laura. All other RSVP's will be cleared on Friday.

    January 30, 2009

  • Michelle

    Sorry for the confusion. We are on for SUNDAY!

    January 29, 2009

  • Gr8tchen

    Notes: Met with Fannie and she remembered us from last year. Reserved the upper section for us for 1/31 or 2/1. She'll call to confirm the date.

    January 11, 2009

29 went

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Meetup has 16 million members with thousands of interests

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy