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Atlanta Fly Fishing and Camping Meetup Group Message Board › narrow loop vs. wide loop

narrow loop vs. wide loop

Rene J. H.
user 5695310
Group Organizer
Alpharetta, GA
Post #: 1
I would like to get some feed back on how we make a wide loop vs. a narrow loop,
and why a narrow loop is better in most situations?
Justin
dryfly777
Augusta, GA
Post #: 4
hmmmm.... I think that I should know this one... :) Better accuracy, distance, and control...
Rene J. H.
user 5695310
Group Organizer
Alpharetta, GA
Post #: 2
Yes, we get better accuracy with a tight loop. We can get better distance and control because it cuts through the air better, you are correct.

Which of the two 'ssspp's are most important in forming the tight loop?

I got a call the other day as to what the SSSPP represented. They are the 'Essentials of the fly cast".

Slack- we don't want any in the system
Straight line- on all planes
Size of the stroke- short cast - short stroke, long cast- long stroke
Power- the proper amount of power at the proper time
Pause- let the line straighten with out loosing tension or falling dramatically

THE 'STRAIGHT LINE PATH OF THE ROD TIP' IS THE MOST IMPORTANT OF THE ESSENTIALS IN ACHIEVING
A STRAIGHT LINE CAST (non- spey or eliptical cast).
ALL OF THE OTHER ESSENTIALS ARE WHAT WE USE TO HELP ACHIEVE SLP (straight line path)
A former member
Post #: 1
I going to take a guess and say power and pause???
Rene J. H.
user 5695310
Group Organizer
Alpharetta, GA
Post #: 3
Andrew,
You have the power correct because it allows us to keep the rod tip going in a straight line.

So the answer to the question, 'how do we make a tight loop?' is;
we keep the rod tip on a straight line path on all planes.

how in the ##$$% do we do that?

One plane is the 180 degrees away from and back to the target.

Another plane is the arch (or lack of because the rod tip bends to reduce it) that the rod tip
travels when it bends or loads and then unloads.

We want to start the cast with the lines tension against the tip of the rod... (no slack) and make a casting stroke (the distance, direction and speed that our HAND moves) so that the rod bends as it goes forward and unbends as it reaches the end of the stroke when we stop.

ie, if we hold the rod straight back from our target and bring it forward with no line tension and no speed the tip would travel in a convex path (like an arch) and the line is going to go where the tip goes so we will get an open loop.

if we start in the same position and apply the proper amount of power at the proper time, the rod will bend and the tip will go in a straight line through the casting arc. thats how we get a narrow loop/by keeping the rod tip on a straight line path.

If thats not clear, ask questions- if it is.....

What is a tailing loop, what casues it and how do we correct it?
A former member
Post #: 2
tailing loops are caused by the tip of the rod dipping under the Straight line path.

It is caused by a unevern power apllication or slack in the line. that is about all i got.
Rene J. H.
user 5695310
Group Organizer
Alpharetta, GA
Post #: 4
Wow, you got it.

We will say that the rod tip travels in a 'CONCAVE' path when we form a tailing loop.
You are right on with the money.

here is the word track and thought process to work out a tailing loop.

We get a tailing loop when the rod tip travels in a concave path.

It is caused by; 1, An eratic or abrupt application of power
2, A casting stroke/arc that is too short for the amount of line outside the
rod tip. (it causes the rod tip to dip and not load correctly)
3, Creeping

The cure for #1 is to make a 'smooth acceleration to a stop'
#2 lenghten the rod stroke/arc
#3 Drift

What is "Creep" and 'DRIFT'?

This is great discussion so we can have a more advanced class soon and work on things with a working knowledge of what we are trying to achieve.
A former member
Post #: 3
Creeping is beginning the forward stroke too early. I'm not so sure about drift, does it have something to do with movement of the rod during the pause?

Can you tell it a slow day at work for me? i got time to answer all of these questions.

If you have a got a glossary list of casting terms or know where i could get one i would appreciate it.
Rene J. H.
user 5695310
Group Organizer
Alpharetta, GA
Post #: 5
Great idea and here is the answer to your question;

The Federation of Fly Fishers web site has a tab called education. With in that is a glossary of the terms used in fly casting.

This is an excellent resource.

I wonder if anyone (that's a member) would mind pulling the terms so we could have them for the meetup to hand out.

I Will not have time to do that for Sunday's meeting but read it and absorb it- it will put hair on your chest.

ps. DRIFT is the opposite of CREEP. Drift is extending the casting stroke in the direction the line is extending after the stop in the casting stroke. It lengthens the casting stroke and increases the rod arc so there is less chance of shocking the rod with the trailing line.....tail a loop.

tight lines,
it's friday night,

Rene
Rene J. H.
user 5695310
Group Organizer
Alpharetta, GA
Post #: 8
Okay,
we have talked about Creep and Drift (sounds like gang members) and we worked on getting tight loops.

If we are doing an normal over head cast and casting wide loops, what can we do to tighten up the loops?

I bet you all heard something a little different at the casting event on Sunday. I'd like to hear what type things you all heard.

tight loops,
Rene
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