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Sven Beiker of Stanford's CARS on Automated Driving

  • Mar 13, 2014 · 6:00 PM
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Title: Automated Driving - Sooner than you think and different than you might expect.


Abstract: Automated vehicles - what is also called “autonomous”, “driverless”, “self driving” - seem to be a big hype at the moment. Many automotive companies, newcomers, and research organizations have shown their concepts and by quite some the year 2020 has been announced already as the year when it all will become reality. The promise is to improve safety and efficiency, along with extended mobility and more convenience. This talk will take a look at what we already have, what we will need, and what we might get in terms of automated vehicles. It will be pointed out that much can be learned already today by not just considering premium vehicles cruising along on the highway, but also other automated ground vehicles, such as in the mining industry or in shopping malls.

Schedule: As usual, pizza & drinks at 6pm, presentation starts at 6:30pm.



Bio: Sven Beiker is the Executive Director of CARS, the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford University. He manages the relationships with industry partners, initiates and conducts research projects, and lectures automotive related classes in engineering and business. He focuses on driver assistance and sustainable mobility aspects. Until 2008 he worked for BMW in chassis and powertrain R&D at corporate locations in Munich, Palo Alto, and Detroit. In 1999 he received his Doctorate degree in Mechanical Engineering (vehicle dynamics) from the Technical University in Braunschweig


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  • Laura R.

    Interesting presentation, but I would have preferred the option of allowing questions during the talk, rather than one long presentation followed by a brief q & a period.

    March 13, 2014

    • John-Mark A.

      Greg -

      March 15, 2014

    • John-Mark A.

      A moderated but open question and discussion period is most informative. It takes a bit of skill to guide the questions and keep things on track, though.

      March 15, 2014

  • Roger M.

    I enjoyed the presentation and hearing the speakers opinion of the time-frame for these stages of US deployment of these developments. The Google experience of 500,000 miles was discussed but missing from the presentation was an estimate of the number of tested miles an autonomous vehicle travel before a design can be established to be as safe or safer than human drivers. Also what should be the appropriate performance metric as there are many and each may yield a different answer ( such comparison metrics as miles between property accidents or alternatively miles between human accident mortalities).

    March 14, 2014

    • Brad T.

      Well, that amount of distance is obviously impossible -- and indeed the cars would go through many generations of software revision in the time to do such a test. No system has been tested to this level of any other kind, and fortunately there are a number of other test regimes which make sense and don't take nearly so many miles!

      March 14, 2014

    • Roger M.

      The reference of 100M miles per mortality is the current overall average for all US driving scenarios. The average is a blended mixture of many different driving scenario cases. It may very well be true that for specific driving scenarios future automated or autonomous driving may significantly exceed traditional human performance and many of these cases may be more practical to ascertain with fewer testing miles. It is important to make these specific advances available to receive their benefit. Finding the appropriate evaluation metrics seems key.

      March 15, 2014

  • Carrie H.

    5 star-excellent. Interesting topic. Thoughtful weaving of themes. Nice balance of text and graphics. Engaging speaking style.

    March 14, 2014

  • Gregory D.

    Thanks to everyone who attended, and thanks to Sven for coming. A great group tonight. Sorry I had to cut off after so few questions--Next time we'll get the presentation started at 6:20 rather than 6:40 when the speaker has to leave by 8...

    March 14, 2014

  • Mark R.

    I found that I enjoyed Patrick Lin's talk on 2/27/14 more than this one, both because of the subject and also Mr. Beiker's presentation style. Another contributing factor may have been that Mr. Beiker did not allow any questions during the presentation.

    March 14, 2014

  • Luther J.

    clear and compelling presentation of developments in the field. I particularly appreciated the way Sven organized the information.

    2 · March 14, 2014

  • Bill

    I am an FCC product certifier (TCB) and general-purpose machine head. Curious as to what type of bandwidth is needed, and what are the potential solutions.

    March 12, 2014

  • luis d.

    Looking forward to it.

    March 5, 2014

  • Doug B.

    My background is in factory automation but current interest is imaging on consumer platforms

    March 5, 2014

  • luis d.

    Looking forward to it.

    March 4, 2014

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