Bay Area Atheists/Agnostics/Humanists/Freethinkers/Skeptics Message Board › Article about creationist strategy

Article about creationist strategy

Miltown H.
Vinny832
Pittsburg, CA
Post #: 68
http://newhumanist.org.uk/2841/ending-the-wedge­

Interesting article if you have a few minutes -- this is a follow-up to the Giant's Causeway controversy in UK and it describes a technique that's very popular among creationists in the U.S.

Perhaps the best solution, instead of trying to shut the creationists out of our educational system altogether as a scientific non-starter (which they are), is to teach their common arguments with the simple scientific refutations that we all know by now. Example: as a response to "There are no transitional fossils," we should be teaching that there are actually hundreds, and, besides, placing such importance on a search for missing links is a red herring which misrepresents how natural selection really works.

In other words, teach what they teach and why it's so easy to prove wrong.

I'm interested in hearing what others think.
Barbara
mebarb
Berkeley, CA
Post #: 52
Yes, interesting read. Perhaps religious right's "theories" have been largely dismissed/ignored b/c they are so...ridiculous. Not grounded in reason. Illogical, etc. Point well, taken, though: maybe a decided approach to counteracting such misinformation is needed.

http://newhumanist.org.uk/2841/ending-the-wedge­

Interesting article if you have a few minutes -- this is a follow-up to the Giant's Causeway controversy in UK and it describes a technique that's very popular among creationists in the U.S.

Perhaps the best solution, instead of trying to shut the creationists out of our educational system altogether as a scientific non-starter (which they are), is to teach their common arguments with the simple scientific refutations that we all know by now. Example: as a response to "There are no transitional fossils," we should be teaching that there are actually hundreds, and, besides, placing such importance on a search for missing links is a red herring which misrepresents how natural selection really works.

In other words, teach what they teach and why it's so easy to prove wrong.

I'm interested in hearing what others think.

Wendy
user 9892369
San Ramon, CA
Post #: 389
Good article. For the reasons articulated therein, I would not favor exposing students to creationist speculation, even if it were for the sole purpose of refuting it. However, every classroom teacher should nevertheless be prepared to answer questions or challenges, as they arise, on this topic from students...and then quickly move on. Devoting time and attention to creationism raises its status...especially in a culture with a prevalent acceptance of the notion that "there's no such thing as bad publicity."
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