December Meet-up: A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Please join me in December when we read a selection by Charles Dickens! 

Hope to see you then!  Carissa

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens-“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times . . .” With these famous words, Charles Dickens plunges the reader into one of history’s most explosive eras—the French Revolution. From the storming of the Bastille to the relentless drop of the guillotine, Dickens vividly captures the terror and upheaval of that tumultuous period. At the center is the novel’s hero, Sydney Carton, a lazy, alcoholic attorney who, inspired by a woman, makes the supreme sacrifice on the bloodstained streets of Paris.

One of Dickens’s most exciting novels, A Tale of Two Cities is a stirring classic of love, revenge, and resurrection.

Charles John Huffam Dickens (February 1812 – June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's most memorable fictional characters and is generally regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian period.  

During his life, his works enjoyed unprecedented fame, and by the twentieth century his literary genius was broadly acknowledged by critics and scholars. His novels and short stories continue to be widely popular.

Born in Portsmouth, England, Dickens left school to work in a factory after his father was thrown into debtors' prison. Although he had little formal education, his early impoverishment drove him to succeed. Over his career he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, 5 novellas and hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms.

Dickens was regarded as the literary colossus of his age.  His 1843 novella, A Christmas Carol, is one of the most influential works ever written, and it remains popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. His creative genius has been praised by fellow writers—from Leo Tolstoy to G. K. Chesterton and George Orwell—for its realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. On the other hand Oscar WildeHenry James and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of saccharine sentimentalism.

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  • Carissa

    Thanks for coming out tonight ladies! So sorry for the noise from the band, how very disruptive! Thanks for the good spirits nevertheless!

    December 17, 2013

  • Jeni

    Sorry, work schedule is crazy as I prep for vaca...

    December 16, 2013

    • Carissa

      We missed you!

      December 17, 2013

  • Devon D'Ewart H.

    Sad to miss this event, but I'm headed out of town the next day. Looking forward to seeing everyone in January!

    December 15, 2013

    • Carissa

      We'll miss you Devon! See you next month!

      December 16, 2013

  • Marilyn

    I hate having to miss this! But I have a client event that just came up and I need to attend :( Enjoy it!

    December 10, 2013

    • Carissa

      :( We'll miss you Marilyn!

      1 · December 10, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    sorry can't make it anymore due to schedule conflict :(

    December 5, 2013

  • Garrick S.

    Sorry I can not make it that is the last day of class for math

    October 24, 2013

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