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Suggested readings for Nietzsche

From: user 3.
Sent on: Thursday, April 24, 2008 5:35 PM
Hi Everyone,
Here is the suggested reading for next month's meetup.

Nietzsche's Theory of the Willl, by Brian Leiter (2007):
http://www.philosophersimprint.org/images/3521354.0007.007.pdf

Abstract
The essay offers a philosophical reconstruction of Nietzsche's theory of the will, focusing on (1) Nietzsche's account of the phenomenology of "willing" an action, the experience we have which leads us (causally) to conceive of ourselves as exercising our will; (2) Nietzsche's arguments that the experiences picked out by the phenomenology are not causally connected to the resulting action (at least not in a way sufficient to underwrite ascriptions of moral responsibility); and (3) Nietzsche's account of the actual causal genesis of action. Particular attention is given to passages from Daybreak, Beyond Good and Evil and Twilight of the Idols and a revised version of my earlier account of Nietzsche's epiphenomenalism is defended. Finally, recent work in empirical psychology (Libet, Wegner) is shown to support Nietzsche's skepticism that our "feeling" of will is a reliable guide to the causation of action.

And for those of you who don't have time, 3 min of Russell and Heidegger on Nietzsche, courtesy of youtube:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHk3_NwH-WM

Please make an effort to read Leiter's (2007) article above before the meetup, it is short (only 15 pages) and dense but readily comprehensible. Bring your own notes on this and any other Nietzsche materials.

Hope to see you there,
The Berkeley Philosophy Meetup Group

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