Oregon Urban Farming Collective Message Board › What are you growing?

What are you growing?

Randy W.
user 6751681
Portland, OR
Post #: 1
What you are an expert at and what you want to learn?

I am doing a super intensive micro-farm this summer. At my home, we have a food forest with these perma-features:


RECURRING FOOD:
Apple trees
Plum Trees
Cherry Tree
Asian Pear
Grapes
Kiwi Fruit
Strawberries
Raspberries
Blueberries
Asparagus


FARMING:
Garlic
Onions
Potatoes
Leeks
Tomatoes
Beets
Carrots
Broccoli
Chives
Peppers
Zucchini (of course!)




A former member
Post #: 2
I am new to the group and I really can use all the help I can get to turn my lawn and barkdust into a lush beautiful and tasty garden.

As of now I have planted 1 fig tree

as far as vegies go that I have planted


4 hanging baskets of strawberrys
lettuce
beets
turnips
radish
garlic
2 zuccini plants

to be planted I have

25 tomato plants
5 yellow squash
5 butternut squash
5 zuccini
5 kale
5 cabbage
15 sunflowers
10 parsley
? chili peppers
2 cucumbers
2 basil
2 cilantro
and more that I cannot remember at this time

I also want to buy to plant

grapes
blueberries
raspberries
black caps
pear tree
cherry tree
apple tree
plum tree
peach tree
kiwi
beans

I have a very small yard but I know with proper planning I can make it work.

Kim

A former member
Post #: 3
Hello,

I have been converting my lawn over the last few years and have saved a large section with good sunlight for the food production. The other shaded areas are for flowers, shrubs and low maintenance perennials. I did sneak a fussy banana in because it is fun.

In my veggie garden, I started peas, chard, golden beets, lettuce, spinach, radishes. The lettuce has been harvestable for several weeks, and I bit into my first radish today. I went for the mild easter egg variety and it was very nice. My asparagus bed was started last year, so I got a few spears and now they have gone to fern.

I have garlic overwintered as well as parsley.

The warm season crops are potatoes, tomatoes, squash and peppers. I have used the planting and sowing suggestions from Livingscape nursery and Steve Solomon's book, Growing vegetables West of the Cascades. I have been very happy with the early jump in growth by following these suggestions. My tomatoes are under cloches and I have been germinating other warmer season plants in my garage on a heat mat, transferring to the cold frame, then planting out when the time is right.

Some permanent food plants include blueberries, raspberries, an espaliered apple, grapes, and lots of herbs.

To Kim starting off her new garden- I highly recommend no-dig beds, or lasagna gardening to cover up that expanse of lawn. There is less soil disruption, your earth worm population will be intact and it is less work. The downside is your beds won't be really deep for a whole year, and you may have to import a lot of materials. The Oregonian has a description of how to make a lasagna bed. Good luck.

Carolyn
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