The Buffalo Gamers Society! Message Board RPG Campaign & Delve Night Discussions › Wesley Young's "The Struggle of Nations"

Wesley Young's "The Struggle of Nations"

Wesley D. Y.
user 6127759
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 1,052
"The Chronicles of Beppe the Magnificent"
by Beppe the Bard


I have no idea where that group of people vanished off to. I think they may be dead. Shortly after arriving in the town, the villagers mobbed the castle with pitchforks & torches, and the whole place went down in flames!

There are now rumors flying around about some sort of demon in the crypt down below, and an open portal to some other plane of existence...
Ashley J.
TheBaronAbraxas
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 41
does anybody remember the amount of experience awarded from the first session?
Wesley D. Y.
user 6127759
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 1,055
791, Ashley. =)
Wesley D. Y.
user 6127759
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 1,060
Just to make sure everybody got my message: We will be holding our usual game at the GameFest on the 24th, at 6pm. Just bring a buck so that we can all contribute towards supporting the Fest, and get your Pirate or Ninja die. Plus I'll be working some Pirates and Ninjas into the adventure. =)
Wesley D. Y.
user 6127759
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 1,067
Party is still clearing-out the dwarven mines. We have a new traveller in our midst ... she's here to stay. And I will try and integrate classic modules into the campaign story, as it seems fitting. I already can see where the plot is generally going, and have selected an old-school module to fit right in. It's a good one. =)

Oh, and JD's character died - rather abruptly - when he lept across a rushing river to stand next to a CR 12 Roper. Good times.
Wesley D. Y.
user 6127759
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 1,068
Rules Update: It would probably help if I actually read the entire text for the Healing skill, because I've been doing it just about 100% wrong. And it was Matt's pestering that brought it to my attention. The healing skill basically doubles the amount of healing you gain from rest, gives a good bonus on helping a character make a save vs. poison, etc. So, from next session onwards, that's how we'll be doing it. You'll need a healing kit for most of it, though.

Poisons, ability damage, diseases: These are going to stay they way they are. They are supposed to be debilitating, and a good reminder to you that your character is mortal. With good use of the healing skill, a few potions, some spells, etc, you can reduce the "downtime" that characters need to take to rest and heal. Remember, the idea is to make you feel that your character is just too busted-up to function effectively, and to challenge the party on the decisions it has to make on downtime - not to drag the game down. It's to force you to stop, heal, and then deal with any consequences of that forced downtime.

Lighting: Big change here. It's no longer going to be abstracted. After reading all the information on lighting from the Core, I've concluded that my currently abstract system just won't cut it. Either characters with low-light vision get nerfed, or torches as a whole get nerfed, etc. The main irritation that I have is that light sources are so precisely calculated, and as a whole they slow down combat. Each light source has a "bright" zone and an "extended" zone of light, and this means that you all just endlessly count squares every round of combat.

To alleviate this, and simplify things quite a bit, I've created a set of yellow "Lightsource" temples, and will mount them on some foamcore for use. If you need to know if a monster is within the light of your torch, just put a marker between you and the creature and you'll instantly know. And there's no two zones of brightness for each lightsource, I just extended the range of all of them basically (averaged it out).

So, light now works like this: Everybody must have some means of seeing in the dark, and torches are probably the best best. Everybody must be holding a torch as a result, or you have to stay near a source of light (either a shield, or a torch, etc.). Creatures in the shadows gain 25% concealment, and creatures in total darkness gain 50% concealment. I would also think that dropping a torch onto the ground, and creating a pool of light, would work, or just shoving the torch into somebody's face (-4 improvised weapon, 1d6 burn) would also come in handy.

Hopefully this will put an interesting element of strategy into combat, while not slowing it down.
Matt S
user 12100247
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 100
Sorry, didn't mean to be a nag.
John G.
user 4700290
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 99
Meh, "nagging" is good when it clears up the gray areas...

So- on another note- I hate to be "That Guy," but is there a chance I can get a ride from someone this weekend? I am car-less these days (grumble grumble), and I'm pretty sure the wife is working late this weekend, which precludes me borrowing her wheels. sad
Kevin N
user 6519902
Buffalo, NY
Post #: 125
i can big u up i just need your address
Kevin B.
Turlock
Medina, NY
Post #: 126
So, light now works like this: Everybody must have some means of seeing in the dark, and torches are probably the best best. Everybody must be holding a torch as a result, or you have to stay near a source of light (either a shield, or a torch, etc.). Creatures in the shadows gain 25% concealment, and creatures in total darkness gain 50% concealment. I would also think that dropping a torch onto the ground, and creating a pool of light, would work, or just shoving the torch into somebody's face (-4 improvised weapon, 1d6 burn) would also come in handy.

This is pretty much why you guys have probably noticed that I've always been a big fan and proponent of the Sunrod.

At the cost of a mere two gold pieces you get a light source that sheds normal light out to 30' for 6 hours as opposed to the torch's 20' for 1 hour.

Better still, unlike the clumsy larger sputtering torch, a Sunrod is about the same size as a wand (1 foot) so it's light and compact enough to stick in a backpack or lash to armor, shields, or weapons and still keep both hands free (ie., no encumbrance).

Consider also that they can be lit as a standard action by merely smacking the tip against any available surface (which, imho, should really be a swift or free action) whereas lighting a torch is a full round action unless you have a tindertwig which still makes it a standard action.

Finally, as if I haven't listed enough selling points of these little gold tipped miracles, since a sunrod's light source is a glowing metal tip as opposed to a flame, there's no reason why it wouldn't work even when wet or submerged!

If you consider that, around this time of year (Autumn) there's about 12 hours of sunlight and 12 hours of darkness, we'd only need 14 sunrods for an entire week! Think about this in terms of being in a dungeon.... We'd only need four sunrods for an entire 24 hours of light but twenty-four torches to get the same. Yep, an entire week in a dungeon would require us to lug around the equivalent of 168 three to four foot long clubs wrapped in damp stinking oil soaked cloth as opposed to the equivalent of 28 odorless dry wands which would fit in just one of our backpacks!

I believe Teal picked up some sunrods on our last shopping trip but I could be wrong. I'll have to check. However, it wouldn't hurt for each of us to pick a couple more up as soon as possible. What do you guys think?
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