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Winchester Skeptics: Deborah Hyde: Halloween Interview With a Vampire Expert

The Vampire has fascinated Western Europe from the early 1700s, but the tradition was a real part of Eastern European lives for a considerable time before that. In the last three centuries, the icon has been taken up by art of all kinds – literature, film and graphics – and it has had a lasting effect on fashion and culture.

But what is the authentic story behind tales of the predatory, living dead and can we understand a little more about being human by studying these accounts? We will look at recent attempts to understand the folklore and try to work out how an Eastern European ritual made its way to late nineteenth century New England, USA.

Deborah Hyde writes, lectures internationally and appears on broadcast media to discuss superstition, religion and belief in the supernatural. She uses a range of approaches and disciplines from history to psychology to investigate the folklore of the malign and to discover why it is so persistent throughout all human communities and eras. She is currently writing a book ‘Unnatural Predators’. She is also a film industry make-up effects production manager who gets on the wrong side of the camera from time to time.

You can keep up with Deb on Twitter @Jourdemayne and on her blog Jourdemayne.com

And as this is Halloween, the most spectral time of year when we all know that the ghosts, ghouls and goblins are out in force we thought we’d do something a little different. So if you feel like getting into the spooky spirit of Halloween then you can come along in costume. A prize will be awarded for the best costume.

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Our Sponsors

  • Active Hampshire

    Science Section, Active Hampshire Social Club-www.activehampshire.org.uk

  • British Science Association

    Funds the speakers travel expenses (www.britishscienceassociation.org)

  • The Tea Bar

    Venue for Cafe Sci talks & social events. 9-13 London St, Basingstoke

  • ActivityForum Ltd

    Use of web site and community building tool Agoria (www.agoria.co.uk)

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