Charlotte Philosophy Discussion Group Message Board › Terry's comment re: why standard of practice for media wouldn't work

Terry's comment re: why standard of practice for media wouldn't work

A former member
Post #: 1,072



Wealth Inequality in America


A former member
Post #: 1,075


Are we doomed to a national surveillance state?
Analysis: As the Obama administration defends its PRISM program in Congress, experts warn that privacy may be a thing of the past.


“The question is not whether we will have a surveillance state in the years to come, but what sort of surveillance state we will have,” Balkin writes.
“Will we have a government without sufficient controls over public and private surveillance, or will we have a government that protects individual dignity and conforms both public and private surveillance to the rule of law?”
­
PRISM: Why the NSA is Mining Internet Data


Accused bank robber wants NSA phone records for his defense

The prosecution had told defense attorneys that they were unable to obtain Brown's cellphone records from the period before September 2010 because his carrier, MetroPCS, had not held on to them.

Not so fast, Brown's attorney Marshall Dore Louis argued in court documents filed in Fort Lauderdale days after the National Security Agency surveillance program was revealed last week...

...Louis argued in court Wednesday that the government should be forced to turn over phone location records for two cellphones Brown may have used because it could prove he was not present for one of the attempted bank robberies, on July 26 on Federal Highway in Lighthouse Point.

"The president of the United States has recognized this program has been ongoing since 2006 … to gather the phone numbers [and related information] of everybody including my client in 2010," Louis said.

ECHELON, according to information in the European Parliament document,
"On the existence of a global system for the interception of private and commercial communications (ECHELON interception system)"
was created to monitor the military and diplomatic communications of the Soviet Union and its Eastern Bloc allies during the Cold War in the early 1960s.[5]

AN APPRAISAL OF THE TECHNOLOGIES OF POLITICAL CONTROL

Donate for the Cryptome archive of files from June 1996 to the present
20 August 1999: Link to follow-up STOA reports on "Development of Surveillance Technology and Risk of Abuse of Economic Information (an appraisal of technologies of political control)," April and May, 1999

19 October 1998
Source: Marie-Jose Klaver, NRC Handelsblad (WordPerfect format, 136K)

See also shorter European Parliment version: http://www.europarl.e...­

AN APPRAISAL OF THE TECHNOLOGIES OF POLITICAL CONTROL


An Omega Foundation Summary & Options Report


For The European Parliament


SEPTEMBER 1998

CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION

2. THE ROLE & FUNCTION OF POLITICAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

3. RECENT TRENDS & INNOVATIONS

3.1 Policy Options

4. INNOVATIONS IN CROWD CONTROL WEAPONS

4.1 Policy Options

5. NEW PRISON CONTROL SYSTEMS

5.1 Policy Options

6. INTERROGATION, TORTURE TECHNIQUES & TECHNOLOGIES

6.1 Policy Options

7. DEVELOPMENTS IN SURVEILLANCE TECHNOLOGY

7.1 Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Surveillance Networks
7.2 Algorithmic Surveillance Systems
7.3 Bugging & Tapping Devices
7.4 National & International Communications Interceptions Networks

7.4.1 NSA Interception of All EU Telecommunications
7.4.2 EU-FBI Global Telecommunications Surveillance System

7.5 Policy Options

8. REGULATION OF HORIZONTAL PROLIFERATION

8.1 Policy Options

9. CONCLUSIONS

NOTES

ANNEX 1 - BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. INTRODUCTION

This report represents a summarised version of an interim study, "An Appraisal of the Technology of Political Control" (PE 166.499), (referred to throughout this document as the Interim Report), prepared by the Omega Foundation in Manchester and presented to the STOA Panel at its meeting of 18 December 1997 and to the Committee on Civil Liberties and Internal Affairs on 27 January 1998.

The Interim Report aroused great interest and the resultant high-profile press comment throughout the European Union and beyond, indicates the level of public concern about many of the innovations detailed by the study. This current report is framed by the same key objectives as the Interim Report(1), namely:

(i) To provide Members of the European Parliament with a succinct reference guide to recent advances in the technology of political control;
(ii) To identify and describe the current state of the art of the most salient developments, further clarifying and updating the areas of the interim report which have aroused the greatest public concern and comment;

(iii) To present MEP's with an account of current trends both within Europe and Worldwide;

(iv) To suggest policy options covering regulatory strategies for the future democratic control and management of this technology;

(v) To provide some further succinct background material to inform the Parliament's response to the proposed declaration by the Commission on electronic eavesdropping which has been put on the agenda for the plenary session of the European Parliament, on Wednesday 16 September 1998.

Online Spying Guides
Facebook Lawful Spying Guide
Gmail Spying Guide
Gmail Sealed Search and Seizure Warrant
Verizon Spying Guide
Go Daddy Lawful Spying Guide
etc.

A former member
Post #: 1,076
Do we need secrets?
What constitutes a secret and the need to have them.
Is this need for secrets an essential element for human society?


JFK speech "The Press and the President" April 27, 1961


A former member
Post #: 1,085
Noam Chomsky talking about PRISM (surveillance program) and Google Glasses

Noam Chomsky on the NSA, privacy and more (2013)


Bill Van F.
wvanfleet
Group Organizer
Charlotte, NC
Post #: 1,847
Do we need secrets?
What constitutes a secret and the need to have them.
Is this need for secrets an essential element for human society?

Will we need secrets in the time of "Homo rationalis"? Is it possible that we can get to the time when we have learned how not to be angry chimps from whom we need protection?

Have we not seen progress as the generations have come along, such that we would not want to go back 100 years to how they were living then? Is it possible that what we are regarding with consternation now among our "younger generations" will be a part of a highly valued way of life in the future? Have we not always reacted with alarm and criticism to things which later we value?

Are we humans not "wired" for intimacy, all living together in the cave with no possibility of privacy and therefore no particular valuing of it, but instead the valuing of not being alone?

And have we found ourselves increasingly living in our own boxes, trying to make them more secure against the predatory behavior of fellow humans, such predation being the outcome of such social isolation?

And are we trying to regain our sense of intimacy in this new, isolating world we have created for ourselves? Can we regain our sense of belonging, now that our cave has become the planet? Can we come to no longer be our most feared predator? Can we come to value being understood far, far more than being "private"?
A former member
Post #: 1,098
How are we as a species socially evolving to the understanding that we've always have been snooping on each other as a species?

James Burke predicted the future in 1973. Now he does it again.
Forty years ago for Radio Times, the scientist and broadcaster James Burke predicted events in 1993.
He got a lot right. So we asked him in to PM this afternoon to predict the future.
The sound begins with an actor reading from the original article, written by Tony Peagam.

https://audioboo.fm/b...­
Here is a chart organizing data as either being 'Non-Relational' or 'Relational' and with the software data processing tools used to inspect these large data stores. Enormous data stores and the tools used to process this data is generically called big data.

Big Data Right Now: Five Trendy Open Source Technologies


A former member
Post #: 2
the media is not relevant.
Bill Van F.
wvanfleet
Group Organizer
Charlotte, NC
Post #: 1,922
the media is not relevant.
Not relevant to what?
A former member
Post #: 1,109




A better democracy will need a better press: Lord David Puttnam at TEDxHousesofParliament


Bad journalism, with its cynical storytelling, damages democracy;
at best, disengaging citizens from active politics and, at worst, leaving them haplessly misinformed.
With an understated and clear voice, Lord David Puttnam calls on us to challenge a culture of negligence by reconsidering our notions about how to balance the freedom of expression (and the freedom to unscrupulously chase profit) with the press's moral imperative to serve democracy.

Bill Van F.
wvanfleet
Group Organizer
Charlotte, NC
Post #: 1,930
Beautiful, Terry!
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