Soloing Workshop

I don't get how soloing works. Can someone explain it to me and possibly several other people and then we can all practice together while drinking the beverage of our choice?

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  • A former member
    A former member

    bingo

    April 22, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Alice's Restaurant?

    April 21, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    We'll see if we can come up with some 8×10 color glossy pictures with circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each one explaining what each one was and ... oh, sorry, that's another song.

    April 21, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Bob, Dan,

    I appreciate your discussion about what happens when a chord changes, and to be honest, I'm still confused; I think I need charts and graphs.

    April 21, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Bob, Dan,-

    April 21, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    I'm sure there are more aspects to it, but this is at least one thing that happens to every single note in every melody when the chord changes. And it's actually pretty cool, I think it's freakin magic.

    April 21, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    All of a sudden the phrase is so la ti do re if you hear the melody against the context of a D chord. Same notes, different function and it really does sound different. Ending a phrase on so is way different than ending a phrase on re, even if you're using the same notes. So is in the pocket, it's part of the major triad, the part that doesn't go minor. It's always part of a chord. Re is not in the chord and it sound open, unfinished, it wants to resolve to something less "outside."

    April 21, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Mike asked a great question at the meetup. "What happens in a song when the chord changes? We can hear it change but how does it make things different? What is a chord change?" It got me thinking about what a chord does as context for a melody. Think of a simple line like do re mi fa so. In the key of A for example. A B C# D E. "Baby treats me mean" (cause she's so mean and evil, etc, whatever.) Now let the chord change to D like a blues tune would and use the same notes. (cont'd)

    April 21, 2012

  • Elissa

    I got some good practice in as well as basic instruction. It was good that we took turns soloing over a simple song. I appreciate the help of those who guided us. Was also nice to just play for fun after the structured portion.

    April 16, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Lots of fun. . .great people there. No real plan for the "workshop" but I think everyone learned something and had a great time.

    April 16, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Good discussions, good questions

    April 16, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Great place to share ideas. We should do this again. Going around circle worked nicely. One idea is to break into pairs, with one doing back and one doing lead. Then switching pairs.

    April 16, 2012

  • Eduardo

    had to miss this one, I'll try and make the next

    April 14, 2012

  • Jeff P.

    Just want to remind everyone we had to move this to 3 not 2. See you then!

    April 14, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thanks Ray.

    December 4, 2011

  • ray

    @PMac Here's a site with the Segovia Scales in tab and standard notation. http://chordmelody.org/pdf/Sego...­
    The first 5 scales I play warming up are CMaj-Amin-GMaj-Emin-DMaj (CaGeD). Once you know all the basic scale forms, you move them around. So CMaj and DMaj are the same form, but for DMaj, you start 2 frets up at D instead of C.

    December 4, 2011

  • prosper_one_

    For anyone soloing, start out with minor pentatonic and major pentatonic. These are the scales you'll hear most often in blues based music and even things such as Jimi Hendrix and the Allman Brothers. If I was in person I could probably help quite a bit...

    October 25, 2011

  • prosper_one_

    I could help. I mainly play lead guitar and improv/soloing is something I work on a lot.

    October 25, 2011

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi Tom, Can you post links to some scales you recommend? Thanks

    September 16, 2011

  • Tom B.

    For starting out soloing, I find that it's best to start with a few basic scales that can be in played over a variety of keys. Blues scales are pretty easy and work well with most rock/folk music. It is important to know the scales, but trying to be too specific with them at first is usually overwhelming. I think this sounds like a great workshop! I'll def come once we determine a place and time!

    September 16, 2011

  • A former member
    A former member

    Step two, know the song. Find chords in the song that contain notes within the chord's triad which are NOT IN the scale of the song's key. Like, as in Salty Dog: G / E / A / / / D / / / G / / / (then repeat). The E chord has a G# in it and if you hit that note you will sound like you know what you're doing. Also the C# note in the A chord. Hit those notes on the one beat, or just use them a lot while that chord is happening or bend up to it from below, find a way to emphasize it.

    July 7, 2011

  • Jeff P.

    Good. Okay. it sounds like you know what you're talking about. Why don't we schedule the workshop for mid July. In the meantime I (hint hint to anyone else that wants in on this) will look into those scales and techniques and practice them. And we'll set something up that you can attend. Thanks for the knowledge and I hope to see you soon!

    June 17, 2011

  • A former member
    A former member

    I'll be out until after the 4th of July weekend but in the meantime, think about the word CAGED. Five chords, each of which has a scale of its own. Now think of the scale as a shape on the fingerboard, the shape of a C chord, or an A, etc. Step 3, scales 301: Play the scales in those shapes starting at the 5th fret. The C shape will be an F, etc. Now you can move up & down and really flex it. C shape on 3rd fret = Eb. This is the first half, know your instrument. 2nd half - know the song.

    June 16, 2011

  • David P.

    Bob, I like your comments (not a rant at all!) and voiced similiar sentiments to Jeff in person. It always nice to hear voices that harmonize.

    June 15, 2011

  • A former member
    A former member

    After that caveat, I'd like to take part in a workshop like Jeff is proposing.

    June 11, 2011

  • A former member
    A former member

    I could contribute to it but the only way I know that really works is if you know the scales. There are ways to break down the scales so they're manageable but I don't know how I could help anyone who doesn't want to do that homework. There's some prep work in soloing that people don't see because it's done in the practice room and not on stage. I'd like to participate in that but I've tried it before with people who didn't want to do the work and it just went noplace. Sorry for the rant ...

    June 11, 2011

  • bill

    this sounds good too!

    June 10, 2011

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Rafaël

We just grab a coffee and speak French. Some people have been coming every week for months... it creates a kind of warmth to the group.

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