addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupsimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruseryahoo

Chicago Arabic language, Culture & civilization Club Message Board › Where to learn Arabic?

Where to learn Arabic?

CuriousChicagoan
user 4939930
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
Christina,
Do you know the name of that professor in Oakton? I am planning on taking Arabic but it seems that there are a few Arabic instructors. Was it a beginning Arabic, intermediate or advanced?
Thanks
A former member
Post #: 4
Hi,
The professor I had was Babacar Mbengue but I looked at the classes offered this semester and it looks like he's not teaching there anymore. I know that Prof. Yousif teaches the intermediate and advanced levels but her classes are now being taught by Camille Harrison. She's the only Arabic professor teaching at Oakton this semester. I've never had class with her, so I'm not sure what her class is structured like or what her teaching style is, but I haven't heard any complaints! If you wanted to do private lessons, I suggest getting in touch with her or Prof. Yousif through email to see if they can help you or suggest other Arabic programs you can sign up for.
CuriousChicagoan
user 4939930
Chicago, IL
Post #: 2
Thanks a million Christina!!!!
A former member
Post #: 5
Afwan! :) Good luck!
Michael R.
user 4710328
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
That's not quite so true. Hebrew has been influenced by Arabic, but modern Hebrew is a little more complex than to say it was "based on Arabic."

The Hebrew of the Mishna was preserved as a pen-language among Jewish literati in formal communications and the so-called Responsa Literature throughout the Middle Ages and through to 20th century. This was especially helpful for Jewish philosophers and thinkers in Europe who could not otherwise communicate with literati in the Middle East (and for a long time the hub of Jewish thought remained in Iraq). Some of this writing - especially from Al-Andalus, North Africa and the Middle East was of coursed influenced by Arabic rhetoric, since writers from these regions had Arabic often as a native language.

Hebrew developed into a modern written form in the same way that Classical Arabic has developed and is thus more organic than you suggest.

The resurrection of which you speak is the resurrection of Hebrew as a spoken language. The Modern Hebrew as a spoken language is based on many elements, most of them European - specifically in phonology and in some morphology (note the '-atsia' suffix).

In the modern period there has been a significant and interesting convergence of some features of Modern Hebrew which appear to be influences of Arabic, and notably spoken Levantine Arabic. Certain idioms, colloquial lexicon and some grammar have been borrowed. This, in my opinion, probably occurred largely during the period of first settlement when most Palestinians and Jewish settlers were still living side-by-side during the British Mandate years.

Cheers and good luck reading up on linguistic history,

-Mike.

The reason that modern Hebrew is so similar to Arabic (besides the fact that they are both semetic languages) is because it is based on Arabic. This is a little know fact. Hebrew was a dead language. It no longer existed. In the early 20th century (I think, but not sure about the time for sure) Jews wanted to "resurect" Hebrew. This became especially important when the formation of the state of Israel became imminant. The problem was that it was completely dead. There was nobody who could speak or understand Hebrew. They still had the script, so they used what little bit they were able to cobble together, and used Arabic (since it was the closest language still in use to Hebrew) to "fill in the blanks" for the rest. They made adjustments wherever they could, and the language has evolved since then. However, if there was no Arabic language, there would not be a Hebrew language today. Just one of those trivia questions I thought I'd share.

Mike


Huggy
user 3088534
Chicago, IL
Post #: 4
You guys ever thought of supplementing your class learning with a language course?

http://fsi-language-c...­

http://www.syrianarab...­
eduardo
user 7599189
Chicago, IL
Post #: 2
please see the posting regarding the courses at the downtown Islamic center. And yes, you do not have to be a muslim to sign on smile
A former member
Post #: 1
I took a "class" at the American Islamic College which really was the professor reminiscing about random things the whole class. After the other two people enrolled dropped out, I was left with this professor which I thought would be great, one on one study. I went to every class, but didn't prepare much because we never got to what I prepared anyway. I would not recommend.

I haven't found much luck anywhere else. I eventually studied in Cairo, Egypt for a year at the Arabic Language Institute of the American University in Cairo which was wonderful. Let me know if you'd like more info about their program.
Huggy
user 3088534
Chicago, IL
Post #: 46
You tried this?


http://www.syrianarab...­
F L
user 9006136
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
The only "school" I've found so far in Chicago is Language Loop LLC (http://www.languagelo...­. Does anyone know anything about the quality of this school, or know of any other schools to check out? Thanks.

-Sion

Another interesting place to study Arabic, although typically they only teach college credited courses, would be Northwestern University. Lynn Whitcomb is one of the best Arabic instructors I have run across and I found her classes to do a good job of preparing people to speak Arabic. Although every blue moon she will lean toward Egyptian dialect, she does an outstanding job of teaching Fusha (clasical Arabic) and introducing people to other dialects found in Al-Maghrib and As-Shams.
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy