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Chicago Chess Message Board › Interesting Pawn Endgame

Interesting Pawn Endgame

A former member
Post #: 2
Last night at the meetup, in one of my games I was in an interesting pawn endgame. I played it wrong and lost the game, but I believe I could have had very good chances in drawing.

Here is the position as I had the white pieces:

White pawn on D3
White King on E5

Black King on B7
Black Pawn on A7
Black pawn on B6

It was my turn to play and I mistakenly played pawn to D4. This allows my opponent to get his King to block my pawn; in other words Black can prevent the pawn from Queening. And of course since he has connected passed pawns, there is no way I can see that I can avoid losing.

What I should have played was King to E6. Then if my opponent pushes one of his pawns I will Queen one move after he Queens so it looks like this position would probably be a draw.
If on the other hand my opponent pushes his King to C7 or C8 then I must push my king to E7; now my pawn cannot be stopped from Queening and when it does Queen I will also gain a tempo since the check that occurs as soon as the pawn Queens.

If any of you guys are interested in analyzing this, let me know what you think, because even though it looks like we will both queen our pawns, black still has one extra pawn and if he can force a queen trade, I am not sure my King can prevent that extra pawn from Queening or not.
Also, I am not sure if I can get a perpetual check or not.

Thanks,
Chuck.
A former member
Post #: 34
Last night at the meetup, in one of my games I was in an interesting pawn endgame. I played it wrong and lost the game, but I believe I could have had very good chances in drawing.

Here is the position as I had the white pieces:

White pawn on D3
White King on E5

Black King on B7
Black Pawn on A7
Black pawn on B6

It was my turn to play and I mistakenly played pawn to D4. This allows my opponent to get his King to block my pawn; in other words Black can prevent the pawn from Queening. And of course since he has connected passed pawns, there is no way I can see that I can avoid losing.

What I should have played was King to E6. Then if my opponent pushes one of his pawns I will Queen one move after he Queens so it looks like this position would probably be a draw.
If on the other hand my opponent pushes his King to C7 or C8 then I must push my king to E7; now my pawn cannot be stopped from Queening and when it does Queen I will also gain a tempo since the check that occurs as soon as the pawn Queens.

If any of you guys are interested in analyzing this, let me know what you think, because even though it looks like we will both queen our pawns, black still has one extra pawn and if he can force a queen trade, I am not sure my King can prevent that extra pawn from Queening or not.
Also, I am not sure if I can get a perpetual check or not.

Thanks,
Chuck.

Hi Chuck,
There is a very cool chess website called http://www.shredderch...­ that is run by a competitive chess software team. They have an endgame applet on the site that lets you test various endgame scenarios. I tested your situation and I am sorry to say that even the Ke6 move would result in a loss for you assuming your opponent plays correctly, after a queen trade as you mentioned. It does however postpone the inevitable the longest and there is a chance your opponent might mess up.
Here is the link to the applet:
http://www.shredderch...­
Cheers!
A former member
Post #: 3
Thanks Mark,

That website is really cool.

Do you by any chance know of any websites like this where you can set up the initial endgame position and then play against the computer ?

It seems that the website you mention does not allow for this or am I just making another blunder ?

Thanks again,
Chuck.
A former member
Post #: 12
For those who might be wondering why this endgame is lost for white (assuming perfect play on both sides), here's my attempt at an explanation:

To stop a pawn from queening, White must keep his king within the square of Black's farthest-advanced pawn. (The square of a pawn can be found by drawing an imaginary diagonal line between the pawn and the queening rank of the pawn, i.e. the 8th rank for a white pawn and the 1st rank for a black pawn.) It is not possible for White to do this and also queen his own pawn - if the White king attempts to stop an advancing Black pawn, he must leave the White pawn unprotected, leaving it to capture by the Black king. If the White king attempts to shepherd his pawn to queendom, he will eventually leave the square of an advancing Black pawn, thus allowing Black to queen a pawn. Also important are the fact that White cannot queen his pawn with check, White cannot blockade both black pawns, and in the event that both White and Black queen their d- and b- pawns, respectively, White's king would be well out of the square of the remaining pawn (and Black's king would be between White's king and Black's remaining pawn), so once Black forces a trade of queens, the remaining pawn would queen uncontested.
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