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ChicagoVeg» Chicagoland Vegetarian-Vegan-RawFood Community Message Board › Vegetarian/Vegan Subsitutions for Animal Protein? Help Please

Vegetarian/Vegan Subsitutions for Animal Protein? Help Please

Robin Veitch G.
user 22821231
Algonquin, IL
Post #: 1
I was given a diet to follow for a bootcamp class I joined and all the protein comes from animals. I'm wondering if anyone can offer substitution suggestions? I asked the bootcamp instructor and he doesn't have anything to offer. I'm not a huge fan of soy substitutions and want to make sure I'm getting enough protein and feeling satisfied after my meals.

Day 1

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
1 cup orange juice

SNACK
Handful of almonds
99% fat free yogurt

LUNCH
1-1.5 grilled chicken breast
1 cup green beans

SNACK (before workout)
Low-fat granola bar (no chocolate chips)

DINNER
1-1.5 grilled chicken breast
1-2 cups green beans

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallon water

DAY 2

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
2 slices whole wheat bread
1 tbsp grape jam

SNACK
2 whole grain rice cakes
1 tbsp organic peanut butter
99% fat free yogurt

LUNCH
Lean Cuisine (preferably containing chicken)
1 cup peas
99% fat free yogurt

SNACK (before workout)
Handful of almonds
1 box raisins

DINNER
1-1.5 grilled chicken breast
1 sweet potato

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallons of water

DAY 3

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
1 slice lean turkey bacon
1 cup orange juice

SNACK
5 whole wheat crackers
5 slices shaved deli turkey meat
99% fat free yogurt

LUNCH
1 chicken breast
1/2 cup brown rice
1 cup green beans

SNACK (before workout)
Handful of almonds
99% fat free yogurt

DINNER
1 tilapia
1-1.5 cup green beans

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallon of water

DAY 4

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
1/2 cup oatmeal
1/2 cup berries

SNACK
94% fat free popcorn

LUNCH
95% lean beef
1 whole wheat bun
1 cup corn

SNACK (before workout)
Oats and honey nature valley bar (2 bars in 1 pack)

DINNER
1-1.5 grilled chicken breast
1-1.5 cup green beans

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallon of water

DAY 5

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
1 link turkey sausage
1 slice whole wheat bread
1 Tbsp grape jam
Cup of water

SNACK
low fat granola bar (no chocolate chips)
1/2 cup berries

LUNCH
Lean cuisine (preferably containing chicken)
1 cup peas

SNACK (before workout)
99% fat free yogurt

DINNER
1-1.5 grilled chicken breast
10 asparagus

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallon of water

DAY 6 (EXAMPLE OF NON-WORKOUT DAY)

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
1 slice lean turkey bacon
1 whole wheat English muffin
1 cup orange juice

SNACK
5 whole wheat crackers
1 Tbsp organic peanut butter

LUNCH
1 chicken breast
1 cup green beans

SNACK
99% fat free yogurt

DINNER
4 slices pork loin (medium slices)
1-1.5 cup corn

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallon of water

DAY 7 (EXAMPLE OF NON WORKOUT DAY)

BREAKFAST
3-4 egg whites
2 slices whole wheat bread
1 Tbsp grape jam

SNACK
Handful of almonds
99% fat free yogurt

LUNCH
95% lean ground beef
1 cup corn
1 cup peas

SNACK
1 low fat granola bar (no chocolate chips)

DINNER
1-1.5 grilled chicken breast
10 asparagus

SNACK
3-4 egg whites

*1/2-1 gallon of water
Reid
user 8855234
Chicago, IL
Post #: 32
First, there are several sources of non-animal protein in the diet above. The word in the vegan community is: if you get enough calories you get enough protein - assuming you aren't doing something crazy.

A common example in response to the protein issue being raised about a plant-based diet is the observation that spinach has more protein per calorie than beef.

You might want to check out the book "The Engine 2 Diet" by Rip Esselstyn. Rip is a fireman and can climb up a firehouse poll, from one floor to the next, using just his hands - with his feet hanging free.

I would say that if you are currently on a plant-based whole-food diet that is nutritionally of high quality, just eat as your body directs you. You will not be protein deprived if you do.

Other books to inform yourself of what a high quality diet is and get a deeper understanding of a healthy vegan diet include "Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease" by Caldwell B. Esselstyn, "The China Study" by T. Colin Campbell, and any cookbooks by John A. McDougall.

Good luck.
Paul R.
user 25093732
Chicago, IL
Post #: 4
For lazy people a vegan protein drink each day is all you need. Industrial hemp seed protein powder is raw, organic and vegan but it tastes like tree bark lol. In the past, protein derived from rice and other plant foods used chemicals to refine the protein out but now Sunwarrior makes a raw, organic, vegan protein powder derived from sprouted rice. It tastes mildly sweet and chalky with an aftertaste of sawdust. It actually tastes good except for the aftertaste. It also has more protein per calorie than hemp seed and a higher bioavailablity index so you need less of it. Good luck
Lori
9492317
Highland Park, IL
Post #: 36
I teach 12 - 15 yoga classes a week on a vegan diet and have for many years. If you are eating a good balanced diet you should be fine. There is so many things wrong with that diet you were recommended. Way too much animal protein for anyone.
I do suggest you keep some tofu and tempeh in your diet even if it is just a servimg or two a week as soy is a great source of complete protein. Adding good grains like quinoa along with legumes as in lentils with brown rice and sea vegetables. Miso soup with kombu , snack on walnuts and almonds ot celery with almond butter. Stirfrys with whole wheat noodles or brown rice with cashews. And yes protein shakes are a great supplement. Check out a good healthfood store and try a couple till you find one that you like and mix with bananas and almond milk or fruits.
Alot is just listening to your body and eating a variety of good whole foods (not processed frozen dinners) and you will be fine. Healthy and strong does not mean meat.
A former member
Post #: 11
Following Lori's suggestions will take you a long way. You may want look at Dr. Joel Fuhrmans' books for recipes. Be sure to include a good quantity of uncooked greens and veggies either juiced or blended salads. Hydrate well and increase your quantity if you feel under nourished. Rest well and remember to Breathe.....
A former member
Post #: 14
Try substituting the Gardein brand of faux "meats" that you can get at Whole Foods in place of the meats in your recipes. I've had most of the varieties and they are really good. The scaloppini cutlets are one of my favorites, and their new orange "chicken" is great too. They also just came out with veggie burgers that taste awesome. I am not vegan so I also use "whey to go" by Solgar, which is lactose free and suitable for vegetarians. So far, I have no health problems. I do take iron and B-12 supplements, along with other supplements as well. Hope this helps.
A former member
Post #: 3
Chia and Quinoa are great and can be added to many items like smoothies, cereals, salads, oatmeals if you don't want to eat them alone

10 Protein packed plants
http://www.care2.com/...­


Iron
http://www.vrg.org/nu...­
A former member
Post #: 12
Unfortunately we focus so much attention on the Essential Proteins and Fats which dominate the American Lifestyle through the meat dairy and soy industry. "We" forget that there are Essential Carbohydrates that are Necessary for health and vitality. If you do a Google search you will find much important information, books and research supporting this area.
Jeff Olichwier (Re...
user 3108235
Chicago, IL
Post #: 32
Hi Robin,

Another thing to know is that your body doesn't need as much protein as you (And many experts) think. I have brought in well know doctors to speak at events and they cannot stress this enough. They recommend eating a balanced diet with a rainbow of colors and you will be fine.

Besides the items listed below, broccoli is mostly protein. All greens have protein. Sprouts are a GREAT source of protein as well.

Here is a link to vegan protein sources.

Here is the main point of the link:

1.Eat lots of nuts. 1/4 a cup of nuts can have upwards of 8 to 9 grams of decent quality protein. Noel recommends soaking the nuts, as it makes digestion and vitamin absorption easier. It’s important to opt for unsalted varieties.
2.Get to know quinoa. 100 grams of quinoa contains some 14 grams of high-quality protein. In fact, the protein in quinoa has a higher BV rating than either beef or chicken. Though quinoa is a seed, it can be used in a variety of dishes. Here are a bunch of quinoa recipes.
3.Stock up on oatmeal. Though you might not realize it, a cup of oatmeal has 6 grams of relatively high quality protein. The quality of the protein, though less than beef or chicken, is slightly better than fish. It’s a great way to start the day!
4.Spread the hummus. A half cup of commercial hummus has 10 grams of protein, and it makes a great addition to a sandwich – or a condiment for fresh veggies.
5.Almond and peanut butter. As nuts are a good source of vegan protein, it only makes sense that almond and peanut butter are also wise choices and great additions for smoothies and snacks. Typically, a serving of nut butter will have 6 – 8 grams of protein.

To Noel’s list, I’d like to add tofu – which is packed with a whopping 40 grams of protein per cup. Soybeans, soy milk and pure soy protein are also a great addition – though there has been some speculation that excess soy consumption may have negative side effects. Nonetheless, soy protein is high in quality. Lentils, tempeh, beans, brown rice and even tahini are also good and protein-rich vegan options.

While I don't agree with everything in the article above (that I have not copied in) it is pretty good for some good info.

In addition to the above, too much protien is a problem as well. So you so not want to over do the protein. Since your body does not store protein it needs to process it in your kidneys.

There are some doctors that believe animal protein is treated like a foreign substance and your body attacks it as such.

Good luck in your quest for information!
A former member
Post #: 142
Robin, I don't think it would be appropriate to try to just replace animal protein with vegan protein and expect to get the same results. You have to look at it in a more wholesome way. It would be better to talk to your physical trainer or nutritionist about making a balanced vegan diet for you that fits your lifestyle, gives you the nutrition you are looking for and does it in a way in which you are able to absorb the nutrition. A lot of nutrients in our diet need other nutrients to make them bio available, so consuming them in isolation will not help. It takes a bit of effort to do some research in this area and finding the right professionals that can help but it is a good investment for your health.

Siri.
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