ChicagoVeg» Chicagoland Vegetarian-Vegan-RawFood Community Message Board › Do you need to add an oil to freshly-juiced vegetables?

Do you need to add an oil to freshly-juiced vegetables?

David K
DavidTraveler
Chicago, IL
Post #: 31
I've found juicing carrot, apple, leafy greens, and occasionally other vegetables has been a great source of sustained energy. I do put in some flaxseed, but I recently heard you need a fat, too, to help absorb the vitamins.

Is this true?

If so, which is best? Nuts? Avocado? Coconut oil? (etc.)

And how much?
Patrick M.
user 11251414
Madison, WI
Post #: 2
Two words: Whole Food. Consuming concentrated calories leads to most every chronic disease, while whole foods keep us healthy for a lifetime. This isn't a black and white issue by any means as we need calories in sufficient concentration relative to fiber to maintain body mass, but it doesn't mean we have to completely remove the fiber through juicing or pressing into oil.
Glad to hear you're drinking green juices, which are calorically sparse to begin with, but when we juice apples and other fruits we've taken the most perfect foods and turned them into concentrated sweeteners with micronutrients (not as bad as without micronutrients like refined sugar, but why play with fire at all?). Similarly when we press the fat out of nuts and seeds and coconuts, we've created concentrated fats out of what otherwise would have been perfect foods. Just because some vitamins are fat soluble doesn't mean we require concentrated fat, and just because we understand some fragments of our metabolic processes doesn't mean we need to try to manage them in isolation and lose the big picture. A lot of "health" information is generated by commercial interests that benefit from a mindset of compartmentalized nutrition and avoiding deficiencies of individual molecules by overstocking them like our bodies are some kind of warehouse that can handle such treatment. I'm sure they mean well, just like big pharma means well in some strange diabolical way, but fortunately we don't have to buy into their premise that whole is not enough.
David K
DavidTraveler
Chicago, IL
Post #: 32
Thanks for the info, Patrick.
Patrick M.
user 11251414
Madison, WI
Post #: 3
My pleasure dude, any time.
Terri
user 9171097
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
I guess I am not very smart, because I didn't get an answer to that question.
Patrick M.
user 11251414
Madison, WI
Post #: 4
I'm sorry, do you mean you asked a question and didn't get a response, or that my response to David's question didn't make sense? I do rant incoherently from time to time. As far as being smart goes, being a member of Chicago Veg suggests some serious smarts in my opinion so let's all chalk up a big one in the smart column!
David K
DavidTraveler
Chicago, IL
Post #: 33
A knowledgeable man in my local health food store suggested either coconut oil or lecithin. I bought both. Still going through the expeller-pressed Nature's Way coconut oil, adding between a teaspoon and a tablespoon per large cup of fresh juice. I can't say I feel the difference, but then again, I don't have a strict control in this experiment.
Anyway, I'll try this for a while, and then switch over to the 1200-mg non-GMO lecithin softgells (from the Now company).

Not sure whether having the juice with avocado or nuts-- a solid food-- would be better or worse. I'm a novice at this, but I understand the enzymes from the produce get into your bloodstream more quickly on an empty stomach.
Terri
user 9171097
Chicago, IL
Post #: 2
I didn't understand your answer to David's question.
Patrick M.
user 11251414
Madison, WI
Post #: 5
I used to be one of those "knowledgeable" health food store employees pushing lecithin and coconut oil and using them myself. The more I studied nutrition, the less I recommended refined sources of nonessential nutrients like lecithin and saturated fats and the more I focused on whole sources of essential nutrients. It's not that lecithin and saturated fatty acids aren't important- it's that your body synthesizes them as needed, as it does with cholesterol, vitamin A, vitamin D, etc. and excess consumption of nonessential nutrients is not only a strain on the body to eliminate or store the excess, it can also lead to dangerous accumulations.
Now, it may be temporarily beneficial for someone transitioning from a diet heavy in animal fat to have these concentrated vegetable fat products to slow down the elimination of fat soluble toxins while the channels of elimination contend with the mess left by incompletely metabolized animal proteins, but for someone on a long term plant based diet these concentrated fats will continue to promote hormonal and metabolic instability. We don't have an "off" switch for fats- on the contrary they metabolize into molecules called endocannabinoids that tell us to eat as much as possible because fat rich foods have been relatively rare until people started pressing oils and domesticating sedentary animals. That's one of the most important reasons to consume fats in a relatively whole food state, the other being to minimize the oxidation of the unsaturated fatty acids.
I had to learn a lot of this the hard way, so I'm always looking to make it easier on someone else, plus it makes me feel good to see someone emerge from the sea of marketing half-truths. Let me know if you're interested and I'd be happy to refer you to some non-commercial resources of excellent health information.
David K
DavidTraveler
Chicago, IL
Post #: 34
Awesome! I AM interested in getting more educated in this.
Thanks.

Just to clarify... though I guess this is counter-intuitive, given the forum we're in... I do sometimes eat meat. I grew up eating it but recently have scaled it back significantly. If it were easier to eat vegetarian out and about in our society all the time, I'd probably do it. But that's a whole drawn-out conversation for another time...

Anyway, I'm going to continue juicing leafy greens + an apple/carrot base pretty much every day. I have a masticating juicer that slowly grinds up the produce (not centrifugal), and while it may be a placebo effect, I really DO think that the fresh juice— I try to buy organic stuff (cheaply)— gives me energy.

My question: Are you saying it's detrimental to one's health in the long-term to add coconut oil or lecithin to the juice? I was told you need to add that in to make the vitamins more absorbable by the bloodstream (or something like that). But if it's going to have long-term negative consequences, I won't do it.

Keep it mind that I have a varied, healthy diet (including occasional meat); do weight training every few days; and do long-distance bike rides.
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy