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Lawrence of Arabia (1962) - Capitol Theater / LUXE Kitchen & Lounge

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
Saturday, March 2 @ 2 p.m.
The Capitol Theater
Running time: 218 minutes – YES! Almost FOUR HOURS! with Intermission.
Director: David Lean
Starring: Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Omar Sharif, Claude Rains, Jack Hawkins, Jose Ferrer
Genre: Epic Drama



David Lean's splendid biography of the enigmatic T.E. Lawrence paints a complex portrait of the desert-loving Englishman (played by Irishman O’Toole) who united Arab tribes in battle against the Ottoman Turks during World War I. This Oscar-winning classic returns to the big screen where it belongs and is presented from a newly restored digital print. It is all in celebration of the film’s 50th Anniversary.

It is unimaginable to consider that this film was produced with a $17 million budget that even in 1962 was tiny. Not including the run of this restored version, the film has grossed move that $70 million.

Lawrence is widely considered to be one the best films of all time. It garnered seven OSCARS at the 35th Academy Awards. Unfortunately, both Peter O’Toole and Omar Sharif were passed over by the Academy and only received nominations. Lawrence was O’Toole’s first major film and arguably one of his best. For some reason O’Toole has been passed over ever since. He has been nominated for eight Academy Awards - for Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Becket (1964), The Lion in Winter (1968), Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969), The Ruling Class (1972), The Stunt Man (1980), My Favorite Year (1982) and Venus (2006) - and holds the record for most competitive Academy Award acting nominations without the gold.

Most people will claim that they have seen Lawrence of Arabia on television, but they really haven’t. The television versions are cut drastically to about two hours including commercials, except for TCM presentations. Lawrence is nearly four hours long and really doesn’t adapt very well to the small screen. Don’t worry as there will be an intermission halfway through. The acting and story is superb but the real treat is in the cinematography. There is nothing like viewing the dramatic shots of the Sahara Desert and the Great Pyramids on the big screen – except for being there in person of course.

OK, now humor me a little. If you join us for Lawrence, please be prepared to relax and stay in your seat all the way through the closing credits. This is one film where the closing is a real treat (like the Life of Pi) with more great cinematography and grand music. And, it would be well worth your time to review the posting on Wikipedia wich is filled with interesting details. (click here) - BJ




WHO: Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Omar Sharif, Claude Rains,
Jack Hawkins, Jose Ferrer

WHAT: Lawrence of Arabia

WHEN: Saturday, March 2 @ 2 p.m.

WHERE: Capitol Theater, 1390 West 65th Street, Cleveland 44102 Map
for information:[masked]

DINNER: 6:15 p.m. (est.) LUXE Kitchen & Lounge, 6605 Detroit Avenue, Cleveland 44102,[masked]


The Capitol Theatre, located in the heart of the Gordon Square Arts District in the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood, will be open on October 2nd. This newly renovated historic movie theatre will feature the best Hollywood and independent films in its three state-of-the-art all-digital auditoriums.

PARKING: There is a free lot just north of the theater on West 65th as well as plenty of street parking. Arrive early to get a spot.

HOW TO FIND US: Meet at the entrance door 15 minutes ahead of time or look for the group inside the theater. DO NOT ARRIVE LATE! This will be well attended so it is advisable to arrive early or purchase tickets on-line to avoid missing the start. We will sit in the upper level, center. This film will be the HOT TICKET this weekend, so a large attendance is expected. The flick is 280 minutes + an intermission, so expect to be out around 6 p.m. You may also meet us afterward outside the entrance door. If you RSVP, we will wait for you. If you do not have a photo posted, you will have to find us.

We have multiple meeting places: 1. Entrance door to the movie in the theater hallway 10 minutes before the movie starts, 2. By the Marquee (or auditorium entrance) after the movie, or 3. Reserved table at the restaurant under the name "Movie Group".

Please let us know your dinner plans on your RSVP so that we can either save you a seat at the "Movie Group" table or plan to meet you at the movie. We have asked for separate checks but please bring cash to pay for your meal.

Our new group will be successful partly because members have a genuine interest in meeting fellow cinema lovers for a discussion before or after the film. We don't always know where to look for you, especially those without a profile picture and first timers.

It’s very important to RSVP early and cancel your dinner reservations if you can’t attend. Please be respectful of the Organizers and the Restaurants we patronize.

Since this is a brand new group, a word from your Organizers:

“We have costs associated with being on meetup.com that we ask you to assist with. Our nominal $5 annual membership fee goes toward the meetup.com charges and other related administrative expenses. Organizers are not compensated and contribute their time simply for the love of the art of film. Please be current on those fees. If you are a paid member of Music Cleveland! then your fees here will be waived - a twofer!”

LUXE Kitchen & Lounge Web Site (click here)

Driving Directions (click here)

Considering the starting time of 2 p.m., we will have plenty of time for a leisurely meal, wine and discussion nearby at LUXE Kitchen & Lounge. Its just across Detroit from the theater.

Please let us know your dinner plans on your RSVP so that we can either save you a seat at the "Movie Group" table or plan to meet you at the movie. We have asked for separate checks but please bring cash to pay for your meal.

Our new group will be successful partly because members have a genuine interest in meeting fellow cinema lovers for a discussion before or after the film. We don't always know where to look for you, especially those without a profile picture and first timers.

It’s very important to RSVP early and cancel your dinner reservations if you can’t attend. Please be respectful of the Organizers and the Restaurants we patronize.

Our early 2 p.m. screen time will qualify for the Early Bird Movie pricing of $6.50/$6. This is a significant film event and will possibly sell out at this popular time. I strongly suggest that an advance on-line ticket purchase would be wise.

For Advance On-Line Ticket Purchase (click here)


Official website: (click here)

SYNOPSIS

This sweeping, highly literate historical epic covers the Allies' mideastern campaign during World War I as seen through the eyes of the enigmatic T. E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole, in the role that made him a star). After a prologue showing us Lawrence's ultimate fate, we flash back to Cairo in 1917.

A bored general staffer, Lawrence talks his way into a transfer to Arabia. Once in the desert, he befriends Sherif Ali Ben El Kharish (Omar Sharif, making one of the most spectacular entrances in movie history) and draws up plans to aid the Arabs in their rebellion against the Turks. No one is ever able to discern Lawrence's motives in this matter: Prince Feisal (Alec Guinness) dismisses him as yet another "desert-loving Englishman," and his British superiors assume that he's either arrogant or mad.

Using a combination of diplomacy and bribery, Lawrence unites the rival Arab factions of Feisal and Auda Abu Tayi (Anthony Quinn). After successfully completing his mission, Lawrence becomes an unwitting pawn of the Allies, as represented by Gen. Allenby (Jack Hawkins) and Dryden (Claude Rains), who decide to keep using Lawrence to secure Arab cooperation against the Imperial Powers.

While on a spying mission to Deraa, Lawrence is captured and tortured by a sadistic Turkish Bey (Jose Ferrer). In the heat of the next battle, a wild-eyed Lawrence screams "No prisoners!" and fights more ruthlessly than ever.

Screenwriters Robert Bolt and Michael Wilson used T. E. Lawrence's own self-published memoir The Seven Pillars of Wisdom as their principal source, although some of the characters are composites, and many of the "historical" incidents are of unconfirmed origin.

Two years in the making (you can see O'Toole's weight fluctuate from scene to scene), the movie, lensed in Spain and Jordan, ended up costing a then-staggering $13 million and won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.

The 1962 Royal Premiere in London was virtually the last time that David Lean's director's cut was seen: 20 minutes were edited from the film's general release, and 15 more from the 1971 reissue. This abbreviated version was all that was available for public exhibition until a massive 1989 restoration, at 216 minutes that returned several of Lean's favorite scenes while removing others with which he had never been satisfied. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Original Theatrical Trailer (click here) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDF0at7sC0M

We often forget that in addition to sweeping overwhelming cinematography, Lawrence has an amazing and wonderful musical score. Here is the opening theme from the film. (click here) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUS_SwThbGE

98 percent fresh according to Rotten Tomatoes (click here)




REVIEWS

Todd Cunningham, Reuters
1:27 p.m. CDT, September 7, 2012


LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) - A digitally restored version of the 1962 film classic "Lawrence of Arabia" will hit theaters nationwide.

The "Lawrence of Arabia 50th Anniversary Event: Digitally Restored," is being presented by Sony Pictures Entertainment and NCM Fathom Events. It matches Sony's release of a "Lawrence of Arabia" limited-edition, four-disc set in a fully-restored Blu-ray with UltraViolet.

The film is being presented in more than 630 select movie theaters around the country.

"Lawrence of Arabia" won seven Academy Awards including Best Picture, and is No. 7 on the American Film Institute's list of the "100 Greatest Movies of All Time."

The David Lean film stars Peter O'Toole in his career-making performance as a young, idealistic British officer in WWI who helps an Arab tribal chieftain in a revolt against the Turks.

In addition to a presentation of the film, restored by Sony Pictures' Colorworks from the original 65mm negative, the screenings will feature an introduction by another of the film's stars, Omar Sharif. Also included will be newsreel footage of the New York premiere as well as footage of Jordan's King Hussein visiting the film set, where he met director Lean, O'Toole and producer Sam Spiegel.

David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia is exactly what everyone describes it as: one of the great cinematic achievements of all time. Peter O'Toole's astonishing debut as well as top notch performances from Sir Alec Guinness, Anythony Quinn, Omar Sharif, and small supporting parts by Jose Ferrer and Claude Rains all come together to make an impressive ensemble. The beautiful cinematography and captivating storyline combine to make a gorgeously engaging epic that plays just as fresh as it did in 1962.
Tim Salmons
Super Reviewer


Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_of_Arabia_(film)

Lawrence of Arabia Theme-Dasert-Sahara-Arabia-Arabs-Storm-Soundtrack-لورانس العرب
You tube: (click here)


NEW YORK TIMES

What Sands of Time Did Not Erase
Lawrence of Arabia,’ Mended, Returns to Screen and Blu-ray

By FRED KAPLAN
Published: September 28, 2012

NO studio today would make a film like “Lawrence of Arabia” — 227 minutes long, featuring a cast of hundreds riding camels through the desert, shot on location (there were no computer graphics in 1962). Yet Sony Pictures’ new 50th-anniversary restoration — playing at theNew York Film Festival on Sunday and in more than 600 theaters nationwide starting Thursday — seems fresh and modern, in its political themes and its stunning visual clarity.

The film’s real-life hero, T. E. Lawrence (played by Peter O’Toole), was a flamboyant British officer who gained fame during World War I for leading a gaggle of Bedouin tribesmen in guerrilla assaults on their Turkish occupiers, paving the way for the Ottoman Empire’s downfall. In the process, he came to see himself as a demigod, destined to unite the Arab people and “give” them freedom — an illusion crushed by big-power politics and the Arabs’ own tribal rivalries: a mix that has thwarted dreams for the region ever since, from Gamal Abdel Nasser’s pan-Arabism to George W. Bush’s cakewalk for democracy in Iraq.

Lawrence figured in the debate over our own recent tangles with insurgents, in Afghanistan and Iraq. His memoir, “Seven Pillars of Wisdom,” was tapped both by the United States Army’s counterinsurgency strategists and by skeptics, who quoted Lawrence’s warning about wars against rebellions _ “messy and slow, like eating soup with a knife” — though the enthusiasts took the pronouncement as a challenge.

But the film holds up not only for its historical parallels but also because it’s thrilling and, in its present incarnation, it looks breathtaking.

The key is that this is a 4K digital restoration. When a machine called the Imagica EX scans across each frame of a film’s negative, it creates a digitally encoded replica that consists of 4,000 (actually, 4,096) pixels on each horizontal line. Multiplied by the 2,160 pixels on each vertical line, this makes for a total of 8.8 million pixels per frame.

By comparison, high-definition TV broadcasts and Blu-ray Discs are made from scans of 2.2 million pixels per frame. In other words, 4K images have four times as much detail and resolution as HD or Blu-ray.

In a connect-the-dots diagram, the more dots there are, the more detailed the resulting image. Similarly, in digital scanning, the more pixels there are, the more that image resembles the actual film. The significance is this: The 8.8 million pixels in a 4K scan are enough to reproduce all the visual information in a frame of 35 mm film — every detail of the image, the full dynamic range of bright to dark, the entire spectrum of colors, even the sheen of “grain” that distinguishes film from video. (“Lawrence of Arabia” was shot in 65 millimeter — nearly twice the width of a 35-millimeter frame — so its negative had to be scanned in 8K, creating 8,192 pixels across each line. But it is still referred to as a 4K scan because it has the same density of pixels, the same resolution across 65 millimeters that 4K has across 35 millimeters.)

This was a laborious process. The tech crew, headed by Grover Crisp, Sony’s executive vice president for asset management and film restoration, spent three months in 2009 simply inspecting the negative, one frame at a time (more than 320,000 frames in all), repairing rips and tears, just so it could run through a scanner without breaking.

The 8K scanning, again one frame at a time, consumed the first half of 2010. Then they looked at the result.

“It was amazingly more detailed and sharp,” Mr. Crisp recalled in a phone interview. “That’s the blessing of 4K. The curse is that it exposes a lot more flaws” — dirt, scratches, faded colors and more.
When “Lawrence” was last restored, in 1988, some of these flaws could be disguised by “wetgate printing,” a process of dousing the print in a special solution. But the new restoration has no prints. The film’s digital data are stored on a hard drive, about the size of an old videocassette, which is inserted into a 4K digital projector. In short, the problems would now have to be fixed.

Luckily, there have been dramatic advances in digital-restoration technology in just the last few years. New software can erase scratches, clean dirt and modify contrast and colors not just frame by frame but pixel by pixel. In the old days (circa 2006), if you wanted to brighten the desert sand in one scene because it was too dark, you’d have to brighten the sky too. Now you can brighten the sand — or even a few grains of the sand — while leaving everything else alone. And in those days there was a limited palette for restoring faded colors. Today’s digital palettes are much vaster.

In one sense, this restored “Lawrence” might look better than the original. Because of the film stock’s exposure to the desert’s heat, some of its photochemical emulsion dried and cracked, resulting in vertical fissures. “Some were just a few pixels wide,” Mr. Crisp said, “but some scenes had hundreds of them, filling as much as one-eighth of the frame.”

No other movies Sony had examined suffered from this problem. The company commissioned a restoration lab, MTI Film, to develop a new algorithm to solve it. The lab’s first few tries were rejected; the fissures were erased but new distortions cropped up in their place. Finally, after months of experimenting, a solution was found; the streaks are now nearly invisible.

And they always will be. Sony went to so much trouble to create not just this release but also a new archive for the ages. Film degrades; digital files of 0’s and 1’s do not. In the coming years, new software might allow still better restorations. But the technicians making them can work from the 4K scan. They won’t have to go back to the negative.

For such an acclaimed film, “Lawrence” has had a troubled life. In January 1963, one month after its premiere, it was cut by 20 minutes. Another 15 minutes was chopped for a prime-time ABC telecast. Inexplicably, all 35 deleted minutes vanished until 1987, when Robert Harris, president of the Film Preserve, a New York-based company, working on a 25th-anniversary restoration, found the footage scattered in hundreds of canisters. In many cases, the audio tracks were gone, so he scrambled around the world and got the actors — Mr. O’Toole, Anthony Quinn and Alec Guinness, among others — to rerecord their dialogue. Between the detective work and lots of video improvement (before the days of digital), it took Mr. Harris 26 months to restore the movie — 10 months longer than it took David Lean to make it.

Its life in home video has been spotty as well. The first DVD, in 2001, was made from a badly done HD transfer: colors were way off, contrasts too bright or dim. A redo, two years later, was much better, but the dirt and scratches were cleaned up by a ham-fisted process called “digital noise resolution” — the easiest and, for some problems, the only technique available at the time, but it softened the focus and dulled detail.

A Blu-ray Disc of the film, out Nov. 13, fixes all those problems, in part because it’s Blu-ray but more because it’s mastered from the same 4K restoration as the theatrical release. Of course, technicians had to “down-res” the data files to Blu-ray’s HD format because there are no 4K disc-players or TVs on the market. Maybe there will be in time for the film’s 60th anniversary.

THIS DAY IN HISTORY (click here) http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lawrence-of-arabia-dies
May 19, 1935:
Lawrence of Arabia dies

T.E. Lawrence, known to the world as Lawrence of Arabia, dies as a retired Royal Air Force mechanic living under an assumed name. The legendary war hero, author, and archaeological scholar succumbed to injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident six days before.

Thomas Edward Lawrence was born in Tremadoc, Wales, in 1888. In 1896, his family moved to Oxford. Lawrence studied architecture and archaeology, for which he made a trip to Ottoman (Turkish)-controlled Syria and Palestine in 1909. In 1911, he won a fellowship to join an expedition excavating an ancient Hittite settlement on the Euphrates River. He worked there for three years and in his free time traveled and learned Arabic. In 1914, he explored the Sinai, near the frontier of Ottoman-controlled Arabia and British-controlled Egypt. The maps Lawrence and his associates made had immediate strategic value upon the outbreak of war between Britain and the Ottoman Empire in October 1914.

Lawrence enlisted in the war and because of his expertise in Arab affairs was assigned to Cairo as an intelligence officer. He spent more than a year in Egypt, processing intelligence information and in 1916 accompanied a British diplomat to Arabia, where Hussein ibn Ali, the emir of Mecca, had proclaimed a revolt against Turkish rule. Lawrence convinced his superiors to aid Hussein's rebellion, and he was sent to join the Arabian army of Hussein's son Faisal as a liaison officer.

Under Lawrence's guidance, the Arabians launched an effective guerrilla war against the Turkish lines. He proved a gifted military strategist and was greatly admired by the Bedouin people of Arabia. In July 1917, Arabian forces captured Aqaba near the Sinai and joined the British march on Jerusalem.

Lawrence was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel. In November, he was captured by the Turks while reconnoitering behind enemy lines in Arab dress and was tortured and sexually abused before escaping. He rejoined his army, which slowly worked its way north to Damascus, which fell in October 1918.

Arabia was liberated, but Lawrence's hope that the peninsula would be united as a single nation was dashed when Arabian factionalism came to the fore after Damascus. Lawrence, exhausted and disillusioned, left for England. Feeling that Britain had exacerbated the rivalries between the Arabian groups, he appeared before King George V and politely refused the medals offered to him.

After the war, he lobbied hard for independence for Arab countries and appeared at the Paris peace conference in Arab robes. He became something of a legendary figure in his own lifetime, and in 1922 he gave up higher-paying appointments to enlist in the Royal Air Force (RAF) under an assumed name, John Hume Ross. He had just completed writing his monumental war memoir, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom, and he hoped to escape his fame and acquire material for a new book. Found out by the press, he was discharged, but in 1923, he managed to enlist as a private in the Royal Tanks Corps under another assumed name, T.E. Shaw, a reference to his friend, Irish writer George Bernard Shaw. In 1925, Lawrence rejoined the RAF and two years later legally changed his last name to Shaw.

In 1927, an abridged version of his memoir was published and generated tremendous publicity, but the press was unable to locate Lawrence (he was posted to a base in India). In 1929, he returned to England and spent the next six years writing and working as an RAF mechanic. In 1932, his English translation of Homer's Odyssey was published under the name of T.E. Shaw. The Mint, a fictionalized account of Royal Air Force recruit training, was not published until 1955 because of its explicitness.

In February 1935, Lawrence was discharged from the RAF and returned to his simple cottage at Clouds Hill, Dorset. On May 13, he was critically injured while driving his motorcycle through the Dorset countryside. He had swerved to avoid two boys on bicycles. On May 19, he died at the hospital of his former RAF camp. All of Britain mourned his passing.



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Join or login to comment.

  • Bill J.

    My favorite film of all time!

    March 3, 2013

  • Lynne B.

    What a great afternoon. Thanks Bill. Matinees rock!

    March 3, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Seeing it on the big screen was like seeing it for the first time. Thanks, Bill, for setting it up.

    March 2, 2013

  • Bill J.

    Running a little behind. Someone please save me a good seat! Thanks!

    March 2, 2013

  • Lynne B.

    Please let me know how to find the group. I'll arrive between 1:00 and 1:15. Lynne B.

    March 1, 2013

    • Bill J.

      From the post above: HOW TO FIND US: Meet at the entrance door 15 minutes ahead of time or look for the group inside the theater. DO NOT ARRIVE LATE! This will be well attended so it is advisable to arrive early or purchase tickets on-line to avoid missing the start. We will sit in the upper level, center. This film will be the HOT TICKET this weekend, so a large attendance is expected. The flick is 280 minutes + an intermission, so expect to be out around 6 p.m. You may also meet us afterward outside the entrance door. If you RSVP, we will wait for you. If you do not have a photo posted, you will have to find us.

      We have multiple meeting places: 1. Entrance door to the movie in the theater hallway 10 minutes before the movie starts, 2. By the Marquee (or auditorium entrance) after the movie, or 3. Reserved table at the restaurant under the name "Movie Group".

      March 2, 2013

    • Bill J.

      and i should repeat - If you do not have a photo posted, you will have to find us.

      March 2, 2013

  • Bill J.

    Just a word of advice for everyone - this screening should be very well attended since we selected the best time and day. I just completed an on-line ticket purchase. I would strongly suggest that to avoid being shut out.

    March 1, 2013

  • Bill J.

    Kate, We'll miss you at dinner. A woman's perspective on this film would be most welcome. I would suggest that you ponder this while watching the film: There are no significant female protagonists in the film - zero!

    March 1, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Gentlemen, I can't stay for dinner, but will meet you at the door for the movie.

    March 1, 2013

  • Bill J.

    Everything is arranged. You have no worries.

    February 28, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I'll be at dinner.

    February 27, 2013

8 went

  • Bill J.
    Organizer,
    Event Host
  • A former member
  • A former member
  • A former member
  • A former member
    +1 guest

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