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Back to the 70's Meetup for LAST TANGO IN PARIS

The Clinton Street Theater present LAST TANGO IN PARIS this coming weekend in 35mm.

Bernardo Bertolucci's LAST TANGO IN PARIS simultaneously mocks and mourns the human yearning for love and companionship. The movie is a requiem for unrequited love, and a testament to the proclivity of humans to surrogate love with lust when trapped in a maelstrom of despondence, chagrin, and compunction. Bertolucci's purpose is not to glorify carnality as a virtue or to scorn it as a vice, but is to use it as an instrument to authenticate the veritable existence of a dark, ugly, and bestial side of humanity, which is so often suppressed and hypocritically denied in similar works on the subject.

Bertolucci's penchant for art is limitless and he uses it to full effect in order to give the movie an aesthetic feel while simultaneously catering to the movie's explorative, earthy, and unconventionally bold motifs. Bertolucci uses his characters uncannily as a medium to foray into unexplored realms of human psyche while unflinchingly projecting them as objects of desire, disgust and depravity. Bertolucci pushes Brando and Schneider to a limit where they are not only forced to compromise their egos but also relinquish their pride, and I say that not as an offence but as an appreciation for his talent as a movie-maker.

Renowned film critic Pauline Kael bestowed the film with the most ecstatic endorsement of her career, writing, "Tango has altered the face of an art form. This is a movie people will be arguing about for as long as there are movies." American director Robert Altman expressed unqualified praise: "I walked out of the screening and said to myself, 'How dare I make another film?' My personal and artistic life will never be the same." Eminent critic Roger Ebert has added the film to his "Great Movies" collection.

RSVP through the meetup group, and you can bring a friend for free!

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  • A former member
    A former member

    wow, just us? I dont' think I should make it my Saturday, with all the stuff at the Secret Society and Dantes. HOpe to meet you soon.

    February 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    gad, having a transportation glitch...was looking forward to this movie.

    February 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Never been to your theater. Is there parking?
    Plans to meet before hand?

    February 8, 2013

    • Lani Jo L.

      Alice, parking is all on the street. We're a neighborhood theater, tucked into the corner of 26th and Clinton, so you might need to walk a block or two, but we've never had anyone complain about the parking situation, and we had 209 for a show last night, and I'm sure TANGO is not going to draw that kind of crowd. Thanks.

      February 8, 2013

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