addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscontroller-playcrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1light-bulblinklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonprintShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

Free Tour of Lamb Spring Archeological Site

The free tour begins at 9:30 a.m. with an introductory video explaining the excavations that have occurred at the site. Visitors then drive to the parking area and walk the distance of about two city blocks to the site.

Please call[masked] to make a reservation.

Here is some information about Lamb Spring.

Lamb Spring is a pre-Clovis prehistoric Paleo-Indian archaeological site located in Littleton, Colorado with the largest collection of Columbian mammoth bones in the state. Lamb Spring also provides evidence of Paleo-Indian hunting in a later period by the Cody culture complex group. Lamb Spring was listed in 1997 on the National Register of Historic Places.

Paleo-Indian were primarily hunters of large mammals called megafauna, such as the Bison antiquus, during a transitional period from Ice Age to Ice Age summer. As the climate warmed, glacial run-off created lakes and savannas. At the end of the summer period the land became drier, food was not as abundant for large animals, and they became extinct. People adapted by hunting smaller mammals and gathering wild plants to supplement their diet.

Lamb Spring was an early to late Paleo-Indian site in Colorado, with Megafauna bison antiquus, camelops, mammoth and horse remains.

Mammoth bones at the Lamb Spring site may pre-date the earliest known human culture, the Clovis tradition, which started about 11,200 years ago. Mammoth bones at the site are dated at 11,735 +/- 95 years ago and 13,140 +/- 1,000 years ago. Many large bones appear to have been broken at the site, which may indicate butchery by early man. There were also some broken rocks with the bones, but it has not been determined that they were used as tools. It has not yet been conclusively determined to be a pre-Clovis site, but continued excavation may find pre-Clovis tools and evidence that more conclusively finds that the mammoth died as a result of hunting.

The camelop bones and artifacts date back to about 11,000 BC. The site has Colorado's largest collection of Columbian mammoth bones. Pronghorn and rodent remains were also found. ] After 11,000 BC the climate changed and all of the megafauna except the bison antiquus were extinct. About 7000 or 6500 BC, Paleo-Indians hunted bison and smaller mammals at the spring.


In the summer of 1960, while constructing a pond at a spring on his property, Charles Lamb found mammoth tusks and bones from about 13,000 years ago. Also found were bison, camel, horse, mammoth, pronghorn, and rodent bones. At the same depth and in the same sediment archeologists also found late Pleistocene era flint chips, meaning that the mammoth were likely hunted by Paleo-Indians.

Join or login to comment.

  • A former member
    A former member

    Ann Winslow was a fantastic docent. Very hard to deal with such a diverse audience and she nailed it. Then there's the swell company and the 'sweller' leadership (thanks Petia/Ken).

    July 13, 2013

  • Cindy W.

    Very high quality, interesting information and site visit, with good company! I could imagine that we were standing on top of undiscovered bones.

    July 13, 2013

  • Erik P.

    Interesting to learn things that have been found here.

    July 13, 2013

  • Mary J.

    Very Interesting, I enjoyed it. Fun group of people.

    July 13, 2013

  • Marilyn

    It was really fascinating! So nice of the Archaeological Society to sponsor these programs! Thanks, Petia and Ken, for setting this up!

    July 13, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Dave is taking my reservation. I can't make it.

    July 13, 2013

  • vincent

    I will not be attending have a class

    July 8, 2013

  • Dinah

    I can't make it, now. I have a class the whole weekend.

    July 8, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I just called and was put on the list--she was not sure of the number of people--sounds very interesting

    July 8, 2013

  • Donna B.

    Just called to confirm my reservations and found that they have 36 people coming, not 60 as shown on our site. The room only holds 45 people, so some of you may not be able to get in. The lady I spoke to sounded alarmed that we had almost double the people than she had confirmed. It is possible that some people will be turned away if their name is not on the list. If you're not coming I suggest you update your RSVP.

    July 8, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Just made a reservation and am excited. So interesting and I love to learn new things.

    July 3, 2013

  • Mark

    I have to work

    June 30, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Can't male it. Hopefully someone can use my reservation.

    June 25, 2013

    • Debora

      Me, I can use it. The day I called the all Jeffco libraries were closed for a training ...keep forgetting to try again.

      June 26, 2013

  • Dinah

    I can't come, now. I'm doing my Wilderness First Responder certification.

    June 15, 2013

  • Sharon

    I called and registered and this is the info that was sent to me by Judy Hammer:

    Meet at 9:30 am at the Neighborhood Library at Roxborough in the Lockheed Martin Conference Room located at 8357 N. Rampart Range Road. The library is in the Roxborough Marketplace at the intersection of Rampart Range and Waterton Roads. The library is located on the second floor which is accessed by stairs or elevator in the center’s clock tower.

    Anne Winslow is the docent, who will present a PowerPoint about the archaeological investigations that have taken place on the site since the 1960s. After the presentation, you’ll follow Anne to the Lamb Spring Archaeological Preserve, where you’ll see the juvenile mammoth cast. Please wear comfortable walking shoes or boots – no sandals and bring drinking water. The tour takes about 2 hours.

    1 · June 5, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I got signed up today quite easily. Judy said the total number for the tour is now approaching 30.

    June 5, 2013

  • Marcia D.

    I got through pretty easily a week or so ago. I left a message for the person who takes reservations, and she called back with in 30 minutes.

    June 4, 2013

  • Mariellen

    max is 40 people - when i called - so who is going and called
    they have 12 people signed up
    i did not reserve any spots
    they said aug 3 and sept 7 tours are wide open

    June 4, 2013

    • Petia

      Our group tour will be on July 13th. August 3rd is the group's anniversary and we have other things planned for that week/weekend.

      June 4, 2013

  • Marilyn

    I finally got through this AM but couldn't yesterday. We're so used to the efficiency of online registration that this seemed really archaic! On the other hand, I made an online apt. over the weekend for yesterday after work at my auto service place with the service mgr I trust completely, but when I got there, my service mgr was on vacation, and the substitute gave me conflicting information.

    May 29, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Has anyone gotten through on the reservation number for this Lamb Spring tour? I've left more than one message w/o any result. I finally got a person at about 11:55 Wed after a ton of rings, but it was an operator & I was routed to yet another place to leave a message. The voice prompts do seem to indicate the folks involved are connected to archeology. Thanks all.

    May 29, 2013

  • ZJD

    sounds fascinating, but I am volunteering that day.

    May 26, 2013

58 went

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy