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FreeThinkers of Fort Worth Message Board The Door › Howard Bloom book: The God Problem

Howard Bloom book: The God Problem

Robert
user 3477588
Group Organizer
Fort Worth, TX
Post #: 48
So I've only read one other book by this guy - The Lucifer Principle - and want to get started on his new one very soon. I cracked it open today while at work and skimmed through the introduction to find something that really has me thinking. Bloom basically asked "what kind of God would you like to have/worship/follow?" and "what kind of God do we find in the Bible?" For the "holy scriptures" tell us that God made man in his own image - but that doesn't compute. People's minds have been pumped full of an anthropomorphic deity for who knows how long, but that concept doesn't really make sense when talking about a being that created the entire universe and actually has no physical form - no body, arms, legs, fingers, and toes, no venerable ancient man with a long, flowing white hair and beard, etc. So what if we change our thinking about the "in his own image" phrase and consider that it actually means we are like god not in terms of physical design but conceptually, behaviorally? From a non-believer's point of view, that may be compatible since we look at the Bible (and Christians themselves) and see its God as a merciless, barking-mad menace to the human race, usually quite content to dehumanize, torture or kill anyone who doesn't believe the same thing (and even those who do - like JOB and JESUS, for example). But that is entirely contrary to what Christians claim: the Bible says we screwed up right from the very start and have always been a bunch of ungrateful, disobedient, wretched little pissants who can do absolutely nothing to earn God's recognition or favor - even though people can only truly be defined by their actions. So which is it? What sense, if any, can be made out of our creation arising from "God's own image?" In other words, if we're little monsters, okay, fine, so be it (and there's an EVOLUTIONARY answer for our violent tendencies in the first pages of the Lucifer Principle; it has NOTHING to do with "we're possessed by evil spirits, the Devil made us do it" - but remind me again, please: who created us? It's much like people hunting down Frankenstein's monster while saying Dr. Frankenstein was such a brilliant and noble and blameless man with the best intentions. Utterly preposterous. If only Christians could see the disconnect between their perfect and eternal creator - who does, quite clearly, behave like a monster over and over and over again in the Bible - making a species of monsters. So why are we to blame? My mind is really turning on this...
Robert
user 3477588
Group Organizer
Fort Worth, TX
Post #: 49
Woe to those who attempt to read this book. I slogged my way through 320 pages (about 250 to go) and finally gave up. What a terrible writer!!! Bloom repeats himself ad nauseum and begins about half the sentences (no kidding!) with "And" so I had the desire to throw the book across the room countless times...
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