COMMON CORE TOWNHALL W/ JOHN WHITE AND OTHERS

State education officials are scheduled to attend a public meeting Oct. 16 in Kenner to discuss the Common Core, a uniform academic standard system that Louisiana and 44 other states have adopted. The meeting, hosted by state Rep. Julie Stokes, R-Kenner/Metairie , begins at 6:30 p.m. in the City Park Pavilion at 3800 Loyola Drive.

Panelists will include state Education Superintendent John White, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education members Jim Garvey of Metairie and Kira Jones of New Orleans and Jefferson schools Superintendent James Meza.

**** This panel is ALL PRO Common Core.   I suggest you come with clear and concise questions and that you direct them to one person on the panel and wait for an answer.  Bring documentation of your points if you can. 

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  • Janet B.

    We need to have both pro and anti-Common Core speakers presiding at each meeting. The audience presented many opposing questions; however, it was very disturbing that the pro Common Core Board was given too much time to express their view.

    October 17, 2013

  • Jackie

    I was told by a teacher at the meeting that select educators in LA write the standardized tests. If that is true, how can one state's scores be compared to another when they aren't asked the same questions? Young is a smooth operator, telling us that he agrees with us and I think we're being sold a bill of goods.
    They are rewriting American history as witnessed by readings from a student's textbook.
    Why can't the BESE Board and educators in LA raise the standards for our students without following UN guidelines? Seems like they should have done this a long time ago!

    October 17, 2013

  • Jackie

    I still don't understand why people can't see that in order for students to pass the tests they have to be taught the curriculum. A teacher sitting by me said that the school could choose their own text books. It doesn't matter which books they choose, because all of them have rewritten history to adhere to the Common Core Standards. Am I dense or something?

    October 16, 2013

  • Carol F.

    Sorry for the long conversation.

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    5) Be prepared with contact information: Have cards printed with your contact information. During public comment, John White and/or BESE members will often counter arguments with their own "data." For example, you will hear over and over the need for our children to be globally competitive. If they direct something to that effect during your testimony, you may consider politely asking them to provide research reports or documents that support their assertions, then give them your contact information so they can send the requested materials. 6) Forward your BESE statement and supporting evidence to your legislators, (and those on the Senate and House Education Committees.)

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    3) Make copies of your evidence for each BESE member (total of 11 members) and at least one or two copies for the media. No, I am not under the illusion that our state media will utilize your research, but we can, with confidence, tell people that the media had access to the information and chose not to report it.

    4) Remain "professional": Prepare yourself for the often condescending attitudes of some BESE members and the occasional snide remarks. As difficult as it may be, it is important to remain calm and maintain a "professional " demeanor. Again, rants and emotional outbursts are likely to be used by BESE or media as evidence to marginalize concerns.

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    2) Address only one topic: Because of the time constraint, you will not be able to speak to everything you may like. It is better to strongly hit one issue. If you are coming with a group, have each person in the group address one specific topic. The board will often allow only one representative from a group speak so when you fill out your card remember to put representing self rather than a group (unless you are the only attendee for a particular group).

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    Suggestions:
    1) Use a prepared statement : Our emotions often get the best of us (been there, done that) when we speak about our children, our values, etc. When we wander and rant, our message gets lost and it is easier for them to marginalize us as hysterical or misinformed. Remember that BESE allows 3 minutes but sometimes reduces that to 2 minutes when they have a large number planning to speak. I would recommend having two statements (one for 3 minutes and one for 2 minutes). Having a prepared statement (and not deviating) helps keep you focused on the message you want to convey.

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    So...is it important that parents and concerned citizens show up and voice their concerns anyway? YES, IT IS ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL. Your showing at this BESE meeting is not necessarily for BESE members, but for your legislators. Because our governor has not moved toward opting us out, nor do I believe he will, our legislators will be key to stopping Common Core. Often state leaders believe that citizens have no staying power so they will wait out the "storm," then go on with business as usual. It will be up to us to prove them wrong...that when it comes to our children, we will go the distance.

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    From Beth Meyers Thank you, Beth! As someone who has attending BESE and legislative committee meetings for a number of years, I would like to extend the following observations and suggestions to those planning to attend BESE meetings this week: First, it is unlikely that anything presented at this meeting will sway the BESE 9 or John White. Their positions regarding education in Louisiana have been pretty much set by those special interests that funded their campaigns. I have come to realize this-- so my goal at these meetings has been to get information into the public record and to continue to be a voice against what I perceive are policies driven not by parents and citizens but by business and special interests.

    October 15, 2013

  • Carol F.

    This from STPSB Mary K. on BESE: Everyone going to BESE meetings, or later to Legislative hearings:

    1- Tips on attending BESE meetings -- from someone who attends frequently. Please read and consider following all of her advice!

    2- Letters to the Editor – I can help with that! If you would also send me your prepared statement to BESE, I can send it as a “Letter to the Editor” around the state (and to media outlets outside our state.) I have an active list of over 360 media contacts, and usually have success in getting other people’s Letters to the Editor in newspapers around the state. (A friend last week got his letter in seven major towns, including New Orleans and Baton Rouge, after I sent it out.) That way, you’ll reach even more in the public, and likely more legislators in other areas. These are your real targets. Whatever you plan to say to BESE, I can help you edit down to the[masked] words most papers allow.

    October 15, 2013

  • Gisela M C.

    Ihope this will backfire. This panel being just few days before voting on taxes for School Board, people who hasn't vote need to vote NO. When you touch their check book, they will start to understand and listening

    October 13, 2013

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