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Greater Denver Urban Homesteading Group Message Board Food Producing Animals › I'm looking for some animals

I'm looking for some animals

David
DavidKamau
Denver, CO
Post #: 11
Hey all, I have been looking through this for a while and have learned quite a bit from everyone here, I love all the information.

I would really like to get some quail or some rabbits, but I am not sure exactly where to go to actually purchase them. Can anyone direct me to my next step? I live in Denver right by the DTC.
A former member
Post #: 1
hi david, i got on here today to post my quail wich i am intending to find a home for, i'm giving them away free. they are about 4 months old, come with their cage wich is a sturdy rabbit hutch. there are 5 ,1 rooster & 4 hens. they are molting & not laying as much as they did though i expect that will pick up again afer their molt. several of them got a virus about a month & a 1/2 ago & 5 of them died. these are the survivors & are not organic as i did give them some antibiotic to try & save them. also, 1 of the hens has an issiue with her foot that i have heard called bumble foot, this has not responded to the antibiotic, though she still gets around & lays eggs. she can stay behind if you like, if you decide you want them. the others have been off antibiotics for about 3 weeks & are healthy. they do produce some fertile eggs wich you can eat or hatch. i have slaughtered 3 healthy roosters recently & its easy enough to do but these little hens are so sweet i thought i'd see if someone wanted them first.we are relocating & this seems simplest. i live in central aurora, let me know if you want them,
peace,
angela
Catherine
user 7217766
Denver, CO
Post #: 2
I raise rabbits - French Angoras (fiber) and Satins & New Zealands. What sort of rabbits are you looking for?
David
DavidKamau
Denver, CO
Post #: 15
Hi! mostly I was looking for some New Zealands and Californians based on what I have read, though I am always open to other suggestions... I am still pretty new at this and am looking for a good place to start. :-D
Catherine
user 7217766
Denver, CO
Post #: 3
Hi! mostly I was looking for some New Zealands and Californians based on what I have read, though I am always open to other suggestions... I am still pretty new at this and am looking for a good place to start. :-D

Satins are essentially New Zealands with shiny coats.
A former member
Post #: 174
I am curious as to the financial benefits of raising rabbits for meat. How does that work?
Deb
user 9632084
Denver, CO
Post #: 22
I raised rabbits for meat for a few years. The meat is delicious, lean and versatile to use. I had 2 bucks and 4 does in my set up. I found that they were a bit more expensive to feed than my chickens have been, but the meat is a lot more expensive than chicken meat in the store too. The poop was a great addition to the garden but they get pretty stinky if you don't keep up with them. The butchering process is pretty easy, but it is kind of tough killing and cleaning enough of them and frequently enough to make it worth the feed (for me, at least for now). I will say rabbits are a lot quieter than my silly hens have turned out to be!!
Catherine
user 7217766
Denver, CO
Post #: 7
I am curious as to the financial benefits of raising rabbits for meat. How does that work?

We've been doing this (raising rabbits) for a year now and they have NOT been a money maker for us. I think if you do enough reading, you'll find that almost no one actually really makes a profit at it. Even if you were to find a market for them [we have not yet - you must be a USDA licensed processor for most meat markets to even consider you] and were also selling other products [droppings, worms that live off the droppings, pelts, etc.] and had a nice climate controlled environment to keep them reproducing all year long and were raising at least some of their feed... then you might be able to break even or turn a small/modest profit depending on what you want to "charge" for your labor.

The investment in cages, feeders, water bottles, nest boxes, etc. has been significant - about $65-75 "per hole" as they say but I've finally reached the point where I won't be investing in any more cages, etc. except as replacement parts.

We've sold a few kits for $10-50 depending on the breed/pedigree but those have by no means paid for all the $$ we've spent on start up costs and regular feed (purchased retail not wholesale). Mostly we wanted to learn how to care for them and get the whole process from birth to butcher under our belts so we'd have yet another layer of skill in our sustainablity and survival arsenal.
Catherine
user 7217766
Denver, CO
Post #: 12
An update....

I managed to sell off all the extra kits I had during the summer and have a few leads for potential long-term sales now. What a relief! Looking forward to year #2.
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