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Horror in October

MEETING LOCATION CHANGE: We now have a more permanent location for our book club! (Hooray!) Barnes and Noble Metro Center will be hosting us in their alcove, which is a nice, quiet, pleasant meeting space for us to have lively discussions. I hope you all enjoy this new venue and find it convenient!

In October we will be reading two selections that fit the theme “Horror in October”: Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood and Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

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Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood

On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues.

As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence.

http://www.npr.org/2011/06/13/128718927/audience-picks-top-100-killer-thrillers

 

Bram Stoker’s Dracula

Famous for introducing the character of the vampire Count Dracula, the novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to relocate from Transylvania to England, and the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and women led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel and invasion literature. The novel touches on themes such as the role of women in Victorian culture, sexual conventions, immigration, colonialism, and post-colonialism. Although Stoker did not invent the vampire, he defined its modern form, and the novel has spawned numerous theatrical, film and television interpretations.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88416912&live=1

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Reminder: We usually choose 2-3 books per month. You're welcome at our meeting whether you read all or none of the books. We read fiction, nonfiction, and plays, and usually try to cover 1 piece of classic literature monthly. We read books reviewed or mentioned on NPR, and try to mirror NPR's tone at our meetings: thoughtful, polite discussion & commentary, with no arguing or posturing, and no sacred cows or unmentioned elephants in the room.?

Suggested Donation: $1, at the meeting. If you are able to make a $1 donation at the meeting, this is appreciated as it helps defray the monthly charge that Meetup.com applies to the group Organizer.

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  • Judy

    What a great discussion about really scary stuff!

    October 21, 2012

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