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Kayaking, Rescue Practice Session

  • Jun 29, 2014 · 10:00 AM

Do you ever worry what would happen if you were to capsize your kayak? It happens sometimes, but fortunately getting back in your kayak isn’t hard if you have a few simple self rescue skills. You can get back in your kayak by yourself using a paddle float, or you can get help from a friend to do an assisted rescue.


On the Philip Edward Island trip over the Canada Day Weekend, I will be taking a day out to practice my kayaking skills. If you would like to join me, feel free to come out and practice your rescue skills, or any other skill you would like to work on. I would be happy to help you figure out any skills you would like to learn. [Disclaimer: I am not an instructor or guide, just a fellow paddler who enjoys learning new skills]


If you would like to learn how to do a self or assisted rescue, I suggest reviewing the following materials prior to the trip. Also, I suggest purchasing a paddle float if you don’t already have one (Killarney Outfitters may have some for sale, but I suggest getting one from MEC or your favourite paddling shop [be aware that some Marine stores sell substandard paddle floats, so Caveat Emptor]). If you feel you may not have the upper body strength to pull yourself back up into the boat, you might also consider acquiring a “rescue stirrup” - a piece of looped webbing that allows you to use your legs to get back into the kayak.


Paddle Float Self Rescue:

http://paddling.about.com/od/safetyprecautions/ss/Howr-To-Self-Rescue-Using-A-Paddle-Float.htm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9qtEJOCqOw&feature=kp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkj2S4yxoQI


Assisted Rescue:

http://paddling.about.com/od/safetyprecautions/ht/Kayak_T-Rescue_Part1.htm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1ot59W2QkI


Bow Rescue:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiBd2RnXu7g


The water temperature for northern Georgian Bay is currently 14 degrees in the middle of the bay, no doubt warmer closer to shore, so hopefully by the weekend the waters close to shore will be cool but comfortable.


What to bring:

- kayak with skirt

- paddle float

- rescue stirrup (optional)

- wet/drysuit (if you have one)

- nose plug (optional)

- ear plugs (if you don’t like water in your ears)

Join or login to comment.

  • Morgan

    Sorry to all that we didn't get a chance to do this during the trip. With the wind and current the conditions just didn't seem suitable for this sort of practice. Hopefully we'll get a chance to do this on a future trip.

    July 2, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      As much as we all would have liked doing this, it was a wise decision not to. Another time for sure!

      July 2, 2014

  • Laura L

    No worries. It's a great idea though, and I appreciate your efforts trying to organize it!

    July 2, 2014

  • Laura L

    I signed up for this, but since I don't have a wetsuit, I reserve the right to chicken out if the water is too cold ;). Thanks for offering this Morgan!

    June 26, 2014

    • Morgan

      No worries. The reason for the event was so that people can review the material before the trip. We'll play things by ear when we get there.

      June 26, 2014

  • Marv

    Thanks Morgan. Meetup.com's mechanics has its limitations. Like a wooden Russian doll (a doll within a doll) this pseudo meetup is an attempt to overcome those limitations.

    Interested in upgrading your kayak skills, you'll want join the Kayaking Philip Edward Island meetup this Canada Day weekend. That is the only way to join this 'rescue practice session'.

    Who knows what other value added, pseudo meetups lurk within this classic event. You too could be the resident expert on, aqua Yoga, African drumming, Inukchuk assembly, chainsaw management, thunder box assembly, vegan camp food cooking, underwater photography, viper snake identification, frog leg BBQ-ing, time lapse photography, rock type identification, tree type taxonomy. We are counting on you.

    1 · June 23, 2014

    • Drea

      Don't forget geocaching Marv ;)

      June 24, 2014

    • Marv

      Probably more applicable than chainsaw management.

      June 24, 2014

  • Morgan

    Here's an interesting article about not being too quick to wet exit: http://www.useakayak.org/reflections/reflec_escape_kayak_12_03.html.

    June 24, 2014

  • Sonya

    Skip that last one.... I ready as far as location needed and assumed it was NOT Phillip Edward. oops!

    June 24, 2014

    • Morgan

      Yeah, sorry, I couldn't figure out how to set the location to "Philip Edward Island Trip", so I left it blank.

      June 24, 2014

  • Sonya

    Hey Morgan, aren't you on the PHillip Edward trip? Thought I saw you as attendee? Would have loved to do this!

    June 24, 2014

  • Cam M.

    Hey, not going on the kayak trip but just wanted to say that I think this is really great. Would be cool to do a kayak rescue day at laurel creek some day too, especially with loaded kayaks.

    June 23, 2014

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