LA Robotics Club Message Board › Quad-copter project discussion

Quad-copter project discussion

Michael S
user 14120050
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 1
We decided on Sat. to send kits, and competitions or project goals.

Here is what I found:

http://www.amazon.com...­

It is much cheaper than full kits, but lacks batteries and the computer.
Art B
user 7807677
El Segundo, CA
Post #: 1
I looked into competitions available.

There is one called the "UAV Outback Challenge" that we might be able to check out further down the line.... This one looks to have a 50k prize.

A more appropriate one for the short term might be the International Aerial Robotics Competition, though we're almost definitely too late to compete this year. This one looks to have a 20k prize.

An electronics sales company called Sparkfun hosts an event anually that centers around autonomous racing of both ground and airborne robots. This one looks to have a 300 dollar prize.


Here is a list of various robotics competitions on Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.o...­
Sir J.
user 14557765
Rosemead, CA
Post #: 1
We decided on Sat. to send kits, and competitions or project goals.

Here is what I found:

http://www.amazon.com...­

It is much cheaper than full kits, but lacks batteries and the computer.


Nice work Michael. I had remember seeing the dragoanflyer long time ago, but couldn't remember the name. Was giving me a headache. This would be a nice proven platform to build on and correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe with its current motors it can only lift 250grams. How about we just get the frame.
http://www.rctoys.com/rc-toys-and-parts/K-DF-FRAME/RC-PARTS-DRAGANFLYER-FRAME.html­

and then order some beefier motors. I tried to figure out what the specs are on the current motors, but the site seems set on being purposely vague. I'm sure there are motors out there much more power which out too much more bulk.
Annika O.
AnnikaSkywalker
Group Organizer
Houston, TX
Post #: 15
I also have a Google Document HERE


I've been busy with summer school and doctors appointments because of my back injury but I'll try to add as much as I can. Anyone who would like to help by becoming a project leader, please feel free to step up.
John
user 4992112
Temple City, CA
Post #: 3
What's the status with the aeroquad? Also, anyone familiar with ROS(Robot Operating system)? Thanks.
John L.
user 14890991
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 1
Last weekend I put together my quadrotor/quadcopter, pictured below with transmitter.



The frame is a Gaui 330X-S, purchased from eBay without the motors, ESCs, and gyro.
The motors and ESCs are the Scorpions and 10A controllers that come with the Gaui kit (sourced separately).
The autopilot is the ArduPilotMega with IMU, magnetometer, GPS, and ultrasonic rangefinder.
The transmitter is a Turnigy 9x (way cheaper than anything else).
The battery is a 2200mAh 3S lipo.

No camera yet, but that's next on the list (after I get comfortable flying it).

I did a bit of research before buying all this stuff, and I'd be happy to answer any questions or help with your planning. And eventually I'll make it to one of the meetups!
John
user 4992112
Temple City, CA
Post #: 4
Wow, that's impressive.

Does it come with the arduino autopilot setup? How does the remote communicate with the arduino?

thanks,

John
John L.
user 14890991
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 2
Does it come with the arduino autopilot setup?
No, I actually recycled most of the electronics from another project. There's an ArduCopter kit sold by DIY Drones or jDrones that comes with an airframe, motors/ESCs, and ArduPilotMega electronics, or you can buy the electronics separately and put them on any airframe you want, which is what I did (slightly cheaper). The Gaui 330X-S is about the smallest that I'd stick these electronics on, there's not much space the way I've mounted things.

How does the remote communicate with the arduino?
Most hobbyist quads use RC hobby electronics, which communicate with multiple servo pulse channels. I've got a 9-channel transmitter and 8-channel receiver, and I actually only use 5 channels (throttle, yaw, pitch, roll, and mode select). Each channel encodes a value of 1000-2000 which gets pulsed out of the receiver (every ~20ms, a pulse of 1000-2000us). Through some 2.4GHz radio magic, the stick positions on the transmitter become pulse lengths on the receiver, which get read by the autopilot.

This is all transparent to the user unless you want to fiddle with code. In the digital age, this seems like an antiquated way to do remote control, but it's dead-simple and reliable, and the electronics exist and are cheap-ish.
John
user 4992112
Temple City, CA
Post #: 5
Thanks for the info and explanation. They really helped me better understand the components behind the ArduCopter. I saw your "Team Zyzzyx" vehicle and I think maybe I should start with a simple ground vehicle to keep the cost down, maybe something that can follow an indoor magnetic tape track. Just a couple line following sensor front and back, and use encoders on two wheels for steering, few peripheral bump sensor for emergency stop, all controlled by ArduPilotMega?

If I can machine/weld my own frame? Do you have suggestion on what type of motor I should use for the drive system? Or any inputs on the idea? Ideally I would like the platform to be large enough to put a pc on it, with at least a couple hours of run time.

It'll be a slow moving platform to learn the basic and build from there.

Thanks,
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