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Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology followed by Greek meal @ Life Goddess

  • Apr 5, 2014 · 1:45 PM
  • This location is shown only to members

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

The Petrie Museum houses an estimated 80,000 objects, making it one of the greatest collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. It illustrates life in the Nile Valley from prehistory through the time of the pharaohs, the Ptolemaic, Roman and Coptic periods to the Islamic period

The Petrie Museum is a university museum. It was set up as a teaching resource for the Department of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology at University College London (UCL). Both the department and the museum were created in 1892 through the bequest of the writer Amelia Edwards [masked]).

Amelia Edwards donated her collection of several hundred Egyptian antiquities, many of historical importance. However, the collection grew to international stature in scope and scale thanks mainly to the extraordinary excavating career of the first Edwards Professor, William Flinders Petrie [masked]).

Go to the museum's website to find out more:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/petrie/about/collections 

After visiting the museum, we shall have some Greek food....mmm should be good ☺

Reviews for Life Goddess:

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Restaurant_Review-g186338-d3870327-Reviews-The_Life_Goddess-London_England.html


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  • A former member
    A former member

    1 · April 6, 2014

  • Agnes A

    Good to see you yesterday, some for the first time. And of course always nice to see familiar faces again :) Shame that some left to have their meal earlier than scheduled ...I know, when nature calls, you've got to go..hungry people may bite! :) See you again

    1 · April 6, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Shame that the group split up and didn't go to the meal, as per initial plan.

    April 6, 2014

  • kal

    Hi I'm running a bit late, can I get a telephone number from someone in the group for when I get there

    April 5, 2014

  • Agnes A

    Bring a small torch if you have one .....Will Be Handy :)

    April 5, 2014

    • Agnes A

      Opens at 1 to 5 pm today. Meet outside when the museum closes. Then we walk to Life Goddess

      April 5, 2014

    • A former member
      A former member

      ok.

      April 5, 2014

  • Luisa W.

    Very sadly I can no longer make this event because of work, even at weekend

    April 4, 2014

  • Agnes

    Sorry guys, I can't make it. :(

    March 23, 2014

  • Agnes A

    It's International Women's Day
    A bit of reading about Hilda Petrie and her contribution
    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10152258361220406&id=52119490405

    March 9, 2014

  • Agnes A

    This could be useful. Written by reviewers on Trip Adviser as regards to getting to the museum

    The Petrie Museum is not that hard to find, from the large Waterstones bookstore on the corner of Gower St./Torrington Pl., cross the street and you'll see some very fine wrought iron gates, go in through there and you're in Malet Place with the museum on the left side. Another reviewer said: The museum is on the UCL (University College of London) site and there are plenty of maps around the campus to mark out where the museum is. It is straight down the road from Euston Square underground tube station, about a five minute walk, and just over five minutes from London Euston train station. There are several cafes nearby, such a Costa Coffee in a Waterstones near the museum as well as cafes on the site of the university open to the public..

    March 9, 2014

  • Luisa W.

    Hello Agnes, I am new to this group - could I understand something please, do you normally have a limit of 10 people for your events, because I seem to be on the waiting list for this one too. Anyway, happy to wait and see what happens next, Many thanks, Luisa

    February 23, 2014

    • Agnes A

      You're welcome to join us Luisa. See you!

      March 9, 2014

  • patrice

    The ancient Africans of Nabta Playa lived in a once green Sahara, drew their rock art illustrating life as it was with leopards roaming and African people swimming ! locally, whilst they monitored the stars and developed the calendar by using their eyes to plot the movement of the stars in the night sky. As desertification grew these ancient Africans journeyed eastwards to a source of water - the Nile - where their intellectual skills were used to develop Egyptian architecture & culture in lower and upper Egypt. Another link, this time to National Geographic's useful article. http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/02/black-pharaohs/robert-draper-text/1.

    2 · February 23, 2014

  • patrice

    I very much agree Yvetta. Herodotus discussed that sweet Egyptian: Greek relationship. It was scholarly admiration as Greeks journeyed the short hop across the Mediterranean. Pythagorus learnt much of his geometry and trigonometry in Egypt too, and I learned it in a UK school! Nowadays the plunder acquired by the habitually war-like British (a terrible psychosis) can usefully be viewed in the British Museum's Egyptology department (just a few minutes walk from the Petrie).

    February 23, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    How appropriate to go to a Greek restaurant after a visit to an Egyptian museum. The ancient Greeks had a lot of admiration for the Egyptians and the learned would travel and spend some time in Egypt broadening their knowledge. The story of the sphinx features in the legend of king Oedipus. And also, one of the most famous cities founded by Alexander the Great is in Egypt and he was famously also buried there.

    5 · February 23, 2014

  • patrice

    glad to see folks are visiting the petrie. for the educated who are interested in scientific evidence and truth you may wish to check out the below u tube clip on the origins of the Egyptian civilisation that continues to be globally admired: where did egyptian civilisation come from? what does the local rock art tell us so plainly and simply? why have these magnificent monuments been desecrated by the west? which pharaoh is depicted in the gigantic sphinx? the excellent UK historian basil davidson had been endeavouring to educate us for years, but so great was the weight of propaganda and lies that all were duped. so where did the egyptian civilisation come from ? check it out........... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9JjWU_rxKo

    February 23, 2014

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