London Black Atheists Message Board London Black Atheists Main Discussion Forum › Breaking the Taboo of Atheism in Black Communities: the video is out!

Breaking the Taboo of Atheism in Black Communities: the video is out!

Heather
user 11060735
London, GB
Post #: 94
Here it is and what a great job everyone involved has done! Let's go all out to promote this - Leo Igwe has done us proud.



https://www.youtube.c...­
MyTime_ThisTime
user 3399980
London, GB
Post #: 285
Very interesting video and record of a significant event. A great beginning. Again, well done y'all. Tip mi hat to ya.

But ...

... and there is a 'but' ...

Seems to me it was really more about 'Breaking the Taboo of Atheism in AFRICAN Communities', which I have no problem with, but feel it should perhaps be billed as such. Otherwise (which seems to be the case very regularly) those who are not 'black' (African Diaspora) are inclined to assume that we are all inhabitants of the same country named 'black' and encounter the same issues. Sometimes we need to be more specific.

I didn't recognise myself (an African, descended through the Caribbean) or any of my friends and family throughout his presentation about 'black' communities. And, was dismayed, that in replication of my history lessons within the British education system he swept over trans-atlantic slavery, only in his presentation he didn't base it upon sugar or cane for a change. But was glad that in his summation, Leo Igwe did finally do a country check (i.e. Africa: Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland, Nigeria, Uganda). Confirmation that it was about Africa and direct African descendants within society.

Also, just a tiny nigling thing, the Northern Ireland issue has less to do with religion than it has to do with a political movement against English colonisation, land grabbing and control.

I look forward to the next speaker, and the hope that there will be recognition of post slavery 'black' communities since the UK, Caribbean, North and South America is full ah we.
Stephen Y.
user 59793382
London, GB
Post #: 65
Thanks Heather.
I just watched the video and must say that you guys did a great job. Very professional. Clive and Lola, you two were excellent in answering the audience questions with intelligent clarity and showed great courage. I will be sharing this with as many people as possible to hopefully get the message out there that its ok to be black and an atheist.
We all evolved as mammals in Africa on this small planet and need to to look beyond our minor differences that divide us.
I think a lot of work still needs to be done in that regard and this is just the beginning. But it's a start and we need to start somewhere. Lets see how far we can go from here, by sharing this video with as many people you can.
Sue M
user 2434141
London, GB
Post #: 3,527
Congratulations to all concerned. LBA will have done a great service to British Secular humanism if it manages to return British Humanism to its role as part of the natural atheist, secularist and humanists alliance that is not afraid to openly analyse, criticise and oppose the effects of religion and other superstitions. BHA humanism has languished for far too long in a stifling fog of 'Sea of Faith' apologetics that belie its activism of the 60's & 70's. As was said at the start of the meeting, people leave religion when people see the contradictions of religious claims - clearly articulated by atheist, secular-humanists.

Atheists IMO should be able to clearly articulate the reasons for their atheism and anti-theism.
Josh K.
JoshKutchinsky
London, GB
Post #: 112
For those who may not know much about the BHA:
http://humanism.org.u...­
AIMS - http://humanism.org.u...­
VALUES - http://humanism.org.u...­
Clive A.
user 48030052
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 49
MyTimeThisTime you are absolutely right it was a talk about 'Breaking the Taboo of Atheism in AFRICAN Communities'. The panel on stage were:
Leo Igwe - Nigerian
Lola Tinubu - Nigerian
Clive Aruede - Nigerian

Are you beginning to see a pattern? If any of the panellists had spoken about what it is like to be a Caribbean, it would have been a big lie or at best a guess.

It has been said before and it is worth repeating that we are all Africans (i.e. genetically every human being on the planet can trace their ancient ancestry back to the Afar Valley in Ethiopia). However that is not what we are talking about here. People of Ancient African Descent feel they have no reason to call themselves African. That is understandable. It takes about 20,000 years for skin colour for example to adapt to new environments and change from the typical dark hue of an African to e.g. the light colour of European skin. In that 20,000 years all connection to an African ancestry is lost.

People of Recent Historical African Descent who still have an African appearance do not usually like to call themselves African. That is also understandable. The Africans who ended up in the Caribbean have a different experience from those who were still in Africa, similarly the Africans who ended up in the Americas, North and South, have a different experience yet again. So when we talk about the Black Communities it is not possible for one person to talk about all these African experiences as an insider, he cannot have experienced them all. A Nigerian will always be on the outside looking in to the Caribbean or American experience. It is therefore incumbent on the Caribbean or American to get up on stage and enlighten us as to their experience. No one else can do it.

So MyTimeThisTime when the opportunity next arises (and it may be here soon), will you get up on that stage and give us the authentic Caribbean experience and point of view? In other words the next speaker that you are looking forward to who will recognise post slavery black communities, could be you.

I think the late great Peter Tosh put the whole thing best in the song African with the lyrics: So don't care where you come from, as long as you're a black man, you're an African!



MyTime_ThisTime
user 3399980
London, GB
Post #: 289
Clive,

Yes we are ALL Africans - to a point. Some of us are closer to Africa than others, and I do think the Caribbean may be closer than the US. As an English Caribbean (Trini & Kittiican descent) of African origin my experience is different again. LBA can't be all things to all people, it would be impossible.

I think you've misunderstood what I was saying, perhaps I didn't express myself clearly. I don't have a problem with the talk directly relating to the African (Nigerian) experience. I think it's a good thing. But, I do think that we assume too often that all audience members will be able to make the distinction between different 'black' communities. I'm not sure that they're able to see that different communities have different issues. I just think it could sometimes be clarified who EXACTLY is being discussed. Perhaps at the beginning of the talk, or in the title of the event, be more specific. That's all.

As for ME getting up on stage ... well, I'm camera shy. And .... not sure whether my experience as a born atheist, who continues to be an atheist is really a story, other than the frustration I've encountered when speaking to theists and some non theists, especially when they've been totally shocked by my atheist reveal.

Clive A.
user 48030052
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 50
Hackney Citizen newspaper has printed an article about the Leo Igwe event.
http://hackneycitizen...­

Adam Barnett, the journalist who interviewed Leo Igwe and wrote the newspaper article also posted a longer version of the article on his blog. Incidently Adam Barnett is an LBA member.
http://adambarnettweb...­
MyTime_ThisTime
user 3399980
London, GB
Post #: 301
Hackney Citizen newspaper has printed an article about the Leo Igwe event.
http://hackneycitizen...­

Adam Barnett, the journalist who interviewed Leo Igwe and wrote the newspaper article also posted a longer version of the article on his blog. Incidently Adam Barnett is an LBA member.
http://adambarnettweb...­

Great article, excellent exposure. Seems Leo Igwe's UK visit is having a major impact.

Again, well done y'all.

Onwards and upwards!

David W.
user 8499504
London, GB
Post #: 36
Here is a brilliant video of ordinary black people in america in 1968, air thair everyday opinions about the vietnam war.
There are parallels that are important to our own time.

This is the style and nature of the debates within our communites in the Black and BME Communities that must and need to happen now, when it comes to adopting Atheism, Humanism, Secularism or dare I say agnostic. Of course the language is of its time and things have evolved because of the political sensibilties have changed over time, but the same issues that affect the Black Diaspora are style prevelent.

It was beautiful to hear these ordinary black people to air opinion that were not cliche and still very relvent to day.


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