Theatre: A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen

A Doll's House, by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen, is the world's most performed play, recognised by UNESCO in 2001 on the Memory of the World Register. When it premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, it was greeted with controversy for its criticism of 19th-century marriage norms. Ibsen, however, rejected the idea that he had made a play promoting women's rights, instead describing his work as 'the description of humanity'.

This production stars Hattie Morahan as Nora, alongside Dominic Rowan as Torvald in a reprise of the production by Simon Stephens (Punk Rock), director Carrie Cracknell (Elektra) and Tony Award winner Ian MacNeil (Billy Elliot), which received rapturous acclaim.

I have booked seat A60 upstairs. Only a few tickets remain so if you want to go, move fast! Book tickets online at: http://www.youngvic.org/whats-on/a-dolls-house

Where to meet: Before the performance at the Young Vic bar, "The Cut Bar" at 6pm.

I will send my mobile to all who RSVP before the event.

 

 

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  • Tom D.

    I really enjoyed this night at the theatre, it was powerfully acted and a cleverly designed set. I kept getting involved in the emotions of it - so that I would automatically cover my face with my hand when a character was saying something embarrassing.
    In summary: great choice, Liam.

    April 16, 2013

    • Daniela Di G.

      ah ah Tom Dore! something like "bloody hell!"? :-)

      April 17, 2013

  • Liam

    Wow, thanks for your contributions guys! Interesting that Hardy was criticising the Church around that time as the matrimonial causes act Maria mentioned was brought in in part to move judgment over marriage from the church to the state. Ibsen always claimed he was only writing about how people behave, not about women's rights movement of his day which is perhaps why his works remain relevant. By contrast Strindberg, whose miss Julie is also on the LEC events calendar, attacked Ibsen's critique of marriage.

    April 16, 2013

  • maria

    That sounds very interesting, thanks Penny Lane

    April 15, 2013

  • Daniela Di G.

    Ibsen's Doll's House is from 1875. Its English contemporary, Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure has a similar theme of women's ATTEMPT of emancipation, where the female protagonist actually fails. Her husband grants her the right to leave his house (unheard of!), which causes first of all HIS ruin: he is demoted as school's vicar, as he is not deemed suitable to educate young kids to the values of family (!). Hardy is VERY critical of the church's conservative, judgemental attitude too! Secondly, it causes the ruin of his former wife too, she descends into extreme poverty and is compelled by society (nobody helps her, she is not treated with respect and looked down at with contempt by other women) to actually go back to her former husband. VERY recommended book, if you are interested in how men-women relationships in England were just one century ago.

    April 15, 2013

  • maria

    Not too sure about Norway, but I thought that in England for most of the century a man had total control over his wife including the right to force her to live with him. Even after the "Matrimonial Causes Act of 1857" which gave a woman the right to a divorce she had to prove cruelty before she could divorce her husband. She was in effect her husband's property, just as Torvold claims when he says to Nora : "you are my dearest possession". Of course women were fighting back, and society's attitude was starting to shift. Ibsen play was il line with this sentiment, when he concluded that Nora had no choice but to leave her husband in order to find who she was and what she believed in". Not only, but this message was so powerfull that one was under the impression that she had a duty to do so.....

    April 15, 2013

  • Liam

    I think she was uncompromising at the end. But she felt there was no alternative since she had compromised too much all her life. Maria i wonder if the law was quite so extreme in Norway, tho in walking out she was giving up her rights and status, which must have been a brave thing to do.

    April 14, 2013

  • maria

    Based on today's values and our view on marriage certainly she was not. However, what we take for granted now it wasn't in the 19th century, when a man still had the right, by law, to force his wife to live with him.

    April 14, 2013

  • Liam

    A powerful play, well acted and provoked a lot if discussion! Thanks guys for coming, I really enjoyed your company.

    April 13, 2013

    • Daniela Di G.

      What type of discussion? Was she too uncompromising to leave? "I am a human being before being a mother and a wife"

      April 14, 2013

  • Liam

    I am reserving some seats in a very crowded bar on ground floor so come and find me when you arrive!

    April 13, 2013

  • Neslihan

    Tickets not available, changed to no.

    April 12, 2013

  • clive

    have changed my RSVP to "no". I have tried to obtain a ticket every day for the past 3 weeks , to no avail.

    April 12, 2013

  • Daniela Di G.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/video/2012/oct/18/nora-ibsen-dolls-house-video
    Watch this short video based on Ibsen's famous play. I dont think the problem here is gender inequality. The problem is life in London is a rat race. She should have left her terrible work rather than her children.

    March 21, 2013

  • Daniela Di G.

    if anybody sells their tickets let me know :-)

    March 14, 2013

    • Tom D.

      Hi, Penny - standing tickets are available still.

      March 20, 2013

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