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How to Become Immortal: Upload your Mind

A former member
Post #: 9
Can brain uploading be achieved within 40 years? Sooner, say some experts.

(CHICAGO) – According to Ian Pearson, a British futurist, death will be a thing of the past by 2050.

Pearson is one of many futurists, cybernetic experts and artificial intelligence researchers whose thoughts are converging on the same basic idea: Why not upload everything that’s in the brain—everything that makes a person who they are—into a computer and then download it again into a new body? Doing such a thing would make the individual theoretically immortal.

For such a thing to work, more advancements will be needed in the hardware and the software, and better interfaces will have to be developed between the human brain and the silicon brain.

Yet how to get there from here is not insurmountable.

Can brain uploading be achieved within 40 years?

Sooner, say some experts. What’s needed are super fast computers with huge memory capacity. They see that happening before 2020 and that’s just 10 years away. If there are unexpected breakthroughs with quantum computers the time line will be shortened considerably.

MORE...

http://www.theglobaltransition.com/artificial-intelligence/how-to-become-immortal-upload-your-mind/­
pleasuremodel
user 11185745
London, GB
Post #: 35
no offence but Pearson was saying this back in the 1990's when he worked for BT

He called it the soul chip then...

http://www.rense.com/...­

Jonathan
Im-not-a-number
London, GB
Post #: 271
This makes a bit more sense to me than trying to extract information from the brain of a desiccated corpse.

Surely though a mind would be downloaded rather than uploaded... For example, if I download a file to my computer, I have to trigger the remote reception of that file, and thus it seems rather more likely that I'd have to push a button on a box somewhere to get the information in my head "downloaded".

Or is the idea that I'll just think "Go Go Gadget Singularity" and a NAS device will spring into action somewhere?

CyberJack
user 2577017
London, GB
Post #: 1
@pleasuremodel: actually, the two things are quite different. Today he's talking about reading the brain of a living person, and thus replicating its current state, whereas the old "soul chip" was just a lifelogger - although at the time Chris Winter - not Pearson - didn't seem to realise the difference ...

"This is the end of death," said Dr. Chris Winter, of British Telecom's artificial life team. He predicted that within three decades it would be possible to relive other people's lives by playing back their experiences on a computer.

Wonderful - for those who haven't got a life of their own ...

"By combining this information with a record of the person's genes, we could recreate a person physically, emotionally and spiritually."

Hmm, probably not. But I recommend Greg Egan's excellent short story "Learning To Be Me" which centres around this idea.

@jonathan: from Wikipedia

uploading can refer to the sending of data from a local system to a remote system such as a server or another client with the intent that the remote system should store a copy of the data being transferred

Your brain is "a local system" - surely the most local system, to the consciousness inhabiting it - and wherever its content to going to be stored is "a remote system", so the term "upload" is correct.
A former member
Post #: 5
Your brain is "a local system" - surely the most local system, to the consciousness inhabiting it - and wherever its content to going to be stored is "a remote system", so the term "upload" is correct.

Surely "copy" would be more correct - whatever the seat of consciousness, it exists as the You you experience as a result of the unique interplay of things (chemicals, physical structure, memory etc) in your own brain, and any replication of that - be it analogue or digital - is just a replica?

Even a backup copy of a Word document is JUST a copy, and doesn't partake of, for example, the editing time due to the pauses between words, or the "undo" actions, font changes etc, of the original.

It's also susceptible to errors stemming from the physical/hardware systems it's copied to or from, and to external malware attacks on the same (software) level both copy & original exist on, which can drastically change one to make it very different right away, and the same is applicable right across to consciousness copying.... but I guess that's another topic.

My point is your consciousness won't "jump ships" so you're suddenly be experiencing that copy's physical location and inputs, instead of your own body.
Jonathan
Im-not-a-number
London, GB
Post #: 276
Hi CyberJack,

My experience of Wikipaedia is that it's mostly guesswork and wishful thinking, so when you say:
Your brain is "a local system" - surely the most local system, to the consciousness inhabiting it - and wherever its content to going to be stored is "a remote system", so the term "upload" is correct.

I'm wondering if I'm being thick or if this an other example of letting *anyone* edit an encyclopaedia; because when I log onto my ISP's mailserver to collect my spam, the data is wherever my ISP is based, whilst I'm local to my computer. Therefore, is it more technically correct to say that email is being uploaded to my computer?

I'm sure if that were the case, then internet pedants would have been pointing it out to us for ages..

pleasuremodel
user 11185745
London, GB
Post #: 45
whatever the details the idea of storing somebodys memories or their soul in a external device is a very old idea and keep resurfacing every now and again.

Does anyone remember "neverwhere"­ when the Marqis de Carrabis keeps his soul in a box and asks Old Bailey to keep it safe. So when the coup and vandermere kill him he can be brought back to life.

I never bought this upload thing - its like having a "digital soul" that you can measure in bits.

its pure fantasy - this uploading stuff and a very strange idea to boot. If you would really prefer to live in a utopian virtual reality instead of a real life then there must be something wrong with your real life.

I can see a "uploading cult" who THINK they have perfected uploading and all commit a bizzare suicide ritual all connected to thier computers. In fact i think another fantasy writer wrote about it once....
Chris S.
crabsallover
Bournemouth, GB
Post #: 57
whatever the details the idea of storing somebodys memories or their soul in a external device is a very old idea and keep resurfacing every now and again.

I first came across this idea in Peter James book 'Host': http://www.peterjames...­ which was made into a mini series for TV.
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