Los Angeles Urban Chicken Enthusiasts Message Board › Chicken Sleeping during day & not eating

Chicken Sleeping during day & not eating

Rishi
user 14626497
Diamond Bar, CA
Post #: 2
Hi Friends,

One of my 7 ladies is showing some very strange behavior recently. She's not eating when I put out greens or feed the last few days. This morning, after she came out of the hen house I found her sleeping. I picked her up to examine her, and when I put in back in the pen, the other chickens started attacking her. I tried feeding her yogurt but she won't take it. I checked to see if she was egg-bound, but I don't feel anything, and she hasn't been laying anyways.


What could be wrong?
Amanda G
user 12128708
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 116
Hey Rishi,

Sorry to hear about your girl .... How old is she?? Is she molting per chance?? When you picked her up does she feel a good weight for her size??? Did you feel her crop?? Is it hard or squishy??? Do you see any signs parasites like mites or lice?? And lastly listen to her breath is she wheezing or sound congested??

I would quarantine her .... she needs to be warm and not harassed by the other girls. This also will give you the ability to check her poops to see if they are normal and make sure she is pooping. I would give her some electrolytes in her water and try to get her to eat some yogurt or egg....

Let us know what other symptoms you notice and I hope she recovers soon!!!
JoAnna
joannapaloma
Alhambra, CA
Post #: 159
Is it possible that she's just very deeply broody? That's happened to several of my hens over the years. I thought they were going to die.
A former member
Post #: 352
She sounds very sick. Can we get a picture of her, some more information on how it started, any any symptoms?
A former member
Post #: 56
Is it possible that she's just very deeply broody? That's happened to several of my hens over the years. I thought they were going to die.

I would immediately, dose her with Nano Colloidal Silver, put say a oz in her water bowl. Meso Silver is the brand I use, and it had saved my life a few times from MERSA etall. It controls virus, some parasites, and all bacteria, and mycoplasms, yes, and Chickens can get Micoplasms, which with virus are a various Auto Immune disease. Next, would give her a little Colostrum, adreanal glandualrs, and some pregnenolone, dose it to weifgt, for a few days! MESO Silver so necessary. With a picture could dowse her! / best, Ron
Nancy
user 13913292
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 86
Any updates? Not eating is a very bad sign in my mind. I would quarantine and put her in a quiet place asap so she does not have to deal w/ her room mates pecking her.

Was this hen added later? Was she one of the original hens? Were the new hens quarantined before they were added? Give a little more info.

Was she laying? What does her comb look like? Color wise?

I would for sure check for mites because those could suck the life out of them.

Try hard boiled eggs sliced into pieces. If she does not take that, there are some serious problems.

Nancy

Rishi
user 14626497
Diamond Bar, CA
Post #: 3
Hi All,

Thanks for all your responses. I added ACV to her water yesterday, and put out some yogurt for everyone. I chose not to quarantine her, because I don't see how to make sense to make a sick animal lonely as well. Today, she looks more lively and I put out more yogurt and she's eating it. Looks like whatever it was is passing. I'll keep you all updated. Think I will add some colloidal silver to water later today too, that sounds like a good idea. Anyone ever tried echinacea on chickens?

Rishi
Nancy
user 13913292
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 88
I understand your outlook about her being lonely but the quarantine is so that whatever she has does not spread to the whole flock. I personally would rather her be lonely for a few days than lose my whole flock. Another thing is that when chickens are down, the others can sense it and they are known to peck to death. I have seen it all to often.

Nancy
A former member
Post #: 172
Hi, Rishi---I support Nancy's rationale for separating a chicken looking poorly as you really should not take the chance of getting all the birds sick. Birds are notorious for getting respiratory infections, hiding the symptoms till it is too late for intervention. The other thing to understand about the need for a isolation zone, or a "hospital crate" (I use a clear, flip-top storage container as a isolation unit) is the need for additional heat that a sick bird has. Thermoregulation is the bird's ability to maintain the proper body temperature and in sick birds this is often compromised. This is why they sit and fluff up the feathers. The isolation unit needs a heating pad or heat lamp. Reptile undercage heater pads, or a heat lamp suspended above the area is very important for relieving the stress their body is under. When a bird is sick, it's impulse is to try to act as normal as possible, so as to not draw attention to their condition---this is part of flock behavior or 'the pecking order' heirarchy. Just trying to maintain this position is stressful, so you misjudge the "alone" factor as causing distress. They really need to consolidate their energy on getting better, not trying to look well for the flock. You really have no way of monitoring how or what she is eating/drinking until she is isolated. It helps to think of human health issues and consider what the doctor or common sense would urge you to do.
Roberta K.
user 10948851
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 403
I was thinking that if they aren't picking on her that she could be with the others, kind of like Rishi was thinking. If they aren't almost dead, i think being cooped up in the house or crate could also be stressful. A little different than people when we know when people are sick so we can isolate them before infection spreads. Just like has been mentioned chickens probably have been sick and with the others past the time that they are still infectious because they hide their illness so well. Just another perspective.

Hope she still is improving!
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