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Los Angeles Urban Chicken Enthusiasts Message Board › Neighbor dog killed my chickens

Neighbor dog killed my chickens

Debbie
user 76599302
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 8
So sorry Christa, my first flock was also killed by a neighbors husky. We have a 6 ft. cinderblock fence and a wrought iron gate. The fist time we thought it was a coyote but the second time we caught the husky red handed. Over the next month the husky climed into our yard 3 times. The owners were never home and when we told them that the husky killed 3 chickens they didn't even apologize. I don't blame the dog, I blame the owners. For 7 years I took a break until I had the resources to build a Fort Knox chicken coop and run plus raise a livestock guardian dog. I actually, came to like the husky (Snowball) over the years, he was alway in our yard and I would lock him up in the house with me until his neglegent owners came home. He was actually very sweet to humans and just wanted attention. Then one day he just disappeared and his owners didn't know what happened to him. Some people should never be allowed to have pets.
christa n.
user 8423908
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 6
Thanks so much you guys, yes, we are planning a new chicken run .I am also so much for freedom, I always say rather have a good short live than a long miserable live. But this was too short for my taste. Four years agoI started with two bantams chickens , Lindsay and Paris . They where best friends always together like Siamese twins and I let them walk around wherever they wanted, till that dog came over and killed Paris. I heard them screaming and could save Lindsey.
Since then we had the chickens in the run only. Well it helped for a while, I guess now we have to built a better one.
Thanks
Laura B.
LauraBonilla
Group Organizer
Norco, CA
Post #: 447
Hi Debbie. This is a bit of an unrelated question but could you tell me what type of livestock guardian dog did you raise? Does he chase after rodents too? How good is he with the chickens? Since I'm letting mine roam so much it would be good to add the extra protection and if he goes after rodents I could solve two problems at once... ( having great problem with rats/mice and ground squirrels too)
Thanks so much :)
Debbie
user 76599302
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 10
Hi Debbie. This is a bit of an unrelated question but could you tell me what type of livestock guardian dog did you raise? Does he chase after rodents too? How good is he with the chickens? Since I'm letting mine roam so much it would be good to add the extra protection and if he goes after rodents I could solve two problems at once... ( having great problem with rats/mice and ground squirrels too)
Thanks so much :)

She was a Kuvasz and she was great. Very gentle with all the little critters, but hated squirrels and cats that weren't ours. She would also discipline our other dogs if they got too rough. Don't know about rodents but I don't think I had any rodent problems the whole time I had her. So I don't know if she got rid of them or we were just lucky during the years we had her. She passed away recently due to complications from medication. I love the breed temperament but shedding is a big issue. Can't wear black if you own one of these plus you will have to vacuum a lot or live with gigantic dust bunnies. She was my favorite fur baby.
Arlynn L.
user 52839982
Agoura Hills, CA
Post #: 7
I am so sorry for your loss! That is so sad.

I am wondering if you could talk to your neighbor, tell them you are heartbroken b/c the chickens were your pets and you are afraid to get any new ones for fear of their dog. I would ask if they would contribute to helping you fortify your coop so their dog cannot get into it again next time. Obviously their dog has come several times and will not just be 'OK' when you get 2 new chickens. So, perhaps they will be willing to help put in the chain link and concrete footers that would keep him out next time. Then you can get new chickens without too much fear. And the neighbors would have made their problem doggie's horrible act as right as they are able.

If they refuse to help reinforce the chicken coop, then I might think about my next step. But, honestly, you will make no peace by calling Animal Control b/c the neighbors really didn't want their dog to do this to your animals. They just didn't realize how determined their dog is to get at the chickens. And no one can watch their animals 24/7. I am guessing their dog got out of their walled/fenced backyard. It happens. Which is why I would ask them to help you build a better chicken coop.
In peace,
Arlynn
Lisa H.
user 65302472
Altadena, CA
Post #: 4
I am so sorry this happened to you. So sad. That is scary having a predator dog after your chickens and not knowing when he will strike again. I hope you are able to resolve this situation. I have had bad experiences with animal control. I know with animal noise complaints, Animal control does not try to resolve the complaint and instead issues scary notices threatening criminal prosecution for creating a nuisance or disturbing the peace. If animal control gets several complaints about the same animal making noise, it turns the matter over to the district attorney for criminal prosecution, even when the complaints are bogus. I do not know how animal control handles other types of complaints; I suspect that it is the same procedure. You could call animal control anonymously and see what your options are. I hope everything works out for you.
Brandi G
user 48566262
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 119
First off, I'm terribly sorry for your loss. It's really awful when people don't take proper responsibility for their pets. No one should have roving animals in their yard, if they don't want that.

On to potential solutions. Have you thought about creating little safe zones scattered around your chicken area? This may be a way to keep the whole thing from being expensively fenced. I have a deck and a few obstacles that a dog could not get under to keep my girls safe. Essentially, little boxes low enough on the ground that a dog could not fit in but the chickens could run for cover? It's my understanding that hawks wouldn't risk going on the ground either so it would work for day time coverage and a very secure coop for at night. You could even use old crates and mount them 6 or 8" above the ground on posts and make them so the dog could not get more than his snout underneath?

Just a thought...
christa n.
user 8423908
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 7
Thanks so much for you replies, I was also thinking about making some small safe boxes, but actually the chickens could have gne in their chicken house where the husky couldn't get in, but they didn't. maybe they where cornered and couldn't . Well, I decided not to call animal control. I am meeting my neighbor on Monday and will hear what we can do, but hsi dog is still missing since then anyway, so I wonder if he wuold help me building or reinforce the chicken run.
I hope something like this never happens to anybody again.
All chickens be safe......
Dawn N.
user 86243652
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 3
My father used to breed huskies when I was a child. While they are lovely and sweet animals they have a very high prey drive. One that can't be broken unless it was addressed when he was a puppy. To complicate matters these owners seem quite irresponsible regarding the number of times he has gotten out from their yard. He could get hit by a car so it seems obvious that they don't really care.

I just got back from a class that had in interesting idea I had never heard of. They said to take the hardware cloth from the coop and actually run it horizontally for 1 foot about 2" deep. Basically having 1 entire food of hardware cloth buried 2" underground surrounding the entire coop. The thought was that any critter will certainly dig and dig close to the coop. Nothing will stop them from digging down deep to get under whatever was sunken down at the coop line. But encountering wire mesh everywhere they dig around the coop seems like a great idea. Only the speaker had done it but she hasn't lost a single animal since doing it 3 years ago, where before she was losing them frequently to racoons and the like. I hope my description is good enough it is easier to describe with a slide.

Best of luck.
christa n.
user 8423908
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 8
Thanks again everyone for your helpful tips, I decided not to meet with the neighbor, i am too exhausted to fight with this guy, btw his husky was found finally.
We just will use all your tips building a new safe chicken run . Then I will look for some silkies .
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