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nora
user 12397577
Monterey Park, CA
Post #: 2
i'm a newbie to this group as well as to the urban chicken world. no coop or chickens as yet. plan to build coop with run included from designs. wrote up designs myself but have already gotten input from some of you on helping me with that.

some questions, just to confirm i've understood it right so far.

i've decided to set aside no more than 12' long and 8 ' wide area of my back yard for this coop. the size of the coop i've been thinking of is 5' w by 8 ' l by 6 ' h.

is 10 sq ft per chicken the amount needed?

is multiplying 5 x 8 x 6 giving me the total amount of square feet or do i only multiply 5 x 8?

i'm only wanting bantams, i think. would like to have no more than 12 chickens all total. would getting all 12 at first be good or should i start out with a few? thinking maybe a few because if something is not right and they pass it would only be a small number.

the only reason i want chickens is for their eggs. goal is to have for self and to sell to generate income. also, to be for my pets.

as to pets, i currently have a dog and a cat so my new furry friends need to have temperaments for them also.

happy and excited to be part of this group. thanks to all for your input.
Vickie
Spinster_Sister
Hawthorne, CA
Post #: 38
Hi there! The first thing you should do is check with your city if backyard chickens are allowed and if so, if there is a limit. Bantams will give you smaller eggs, do small eggs sell well in your area? As a rule of thumb, RUN minimum is 10' per bird for standard size chickens. COOP size is minimum of 2' per standard bird. So your 5x8=40', for 12 bantams should be very tight fit for a RUN, but for the coop you will have to check if you will put the coop inside the run or outside the run. If your coop is inside the run, then the 40' is definitely not large enough.

Chickens are awesome pets, I am so glad that I have some!

Have you thought of hatching eggs yourself or are you going to buy some chicks first? If you hatch your eggs, you will have a far less chance of disease (at least at first) if you buy chicks or started pullets and then add them a group at a time, you run a higher risk.

I would pick up a few chicks to start off with. Raise them up to adulthood and if you enjoy them, then hatch out some eggs to ensure that there are no disease making it's way to your adult flock.

What breed were you looking at?

Mark
user 11282257
North Hollywood, CA
Post #: 3
Hi Nora

My friends lived in Monterey Park and I lived in Alhambra some years ago and we could not have pet chickens. I moved to North Hollywood and now can have chickens. I do not think? I can have a public business of selling eggs. Also most of the cities/county requires a set back; the City of Los Angeles is 20 feet from my home and 35 feet from the neighbors homes. I am on a corner lot and it is the right size. Also, their is a noise and rooster rules. But all my neighbors have (loud) dogs so we/I do not have a problem with chickens (only hens).

Mark

Barbara D.
Babsadon
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 1
I have 12 chickens, and have enjoyed them immensely as pets. It's fun going out and collecting their tasty eggs, and yes, I thank them personally. It's important to me to have eggs from chickens that I know have been treated kindly. You should know that after a year, their egg production slows down dramatically, so I don't think you will generate much income. Commercial egg farms don't keep retired chickens around. They become someone's dinner. Personally, I am content to have retired chickens because I like them as pets.
Leanne
user 11879008
Long Beach, CA
Post #: 16

would getting all 12 at first be good or should i start out with a few? thinking maybe a few because if something is not right and they pass it would only be a small number.

the only reason i want chickens is for their eggs. goal is to have for self and to sell to generate income. also, to be for my pets.

Hi!

I would recommend you get all the birds at once. They establish a pecking order as they grow up, and introducing new chickens is stressful on the whole flock, not just the new commers. I would also recommend you get a couple extra to allow for accidental roosters or losses if you get bantams. Although hatcheries can sort for gender at hatch on the large breeds, they are only 90% accurate, so you may get at least one or two males. Bantams are usually not available sorted for gender at hatch because they are too small, therefore you would have to get double the amount chicks you eventually need for egg laying hens. You could always sell a few if you have too many, but it is harder to add hens in. It is possible, but not as easy to introduce new chickens, and usually you have to set aside a space where the new ones can be quarantined away from the existing flock for a month or so.

I don't personally sell eggs, but around me, most egg buyers are looking for large to extra large sized eggs. Bantams don't lay eggs that big, medium is the biggest you might get, and small is more typical.
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