CENTRAL PARK WALK : CONSERVATORY GARDEN TO SEE CHEERY BLOSSOM,NORTH WOODS-6 MILE

  • April 19, 2014 · 11:45 AM
  • This location is shown only to members







WE GOING TO WALK IN CENTRAL PARK. SOME IMPORTANT LOCATION IS MENTIONED HERE TO SEE AROUND THIS WALK; WE FINISH OUR WALK AT WHOLE FOOD,COLUMBUS CIRCLE,TIME WARNER BUILDING. 


We meet at 11:45 AM. We wait for everyone until  12:15 PM and then walk start.Please come early so you can meet and greet each other before start walk.


WE MIGHT SEE ALL BEAUTIFUL CHERRY BLOSSOM TREE IN SIDE THE GARDEN AND AROUND RESORVIR.



Conservatory Garden Center Fountain


Center Fountain in Central Park's Conservatory Garden



 

With its elegant geyser fountain standing before a wrought-iron wisteria pergola, the Italian-designed Center Garden is an enchanting spot. From the steps of Vanderbilt Gate on Fifth Avenue and 105th Street, the sweeping view of the Center Garden's formal green lawn is capped at the far end with this elegant geyser fountain. One of three stylized gardens that make up the six-acre Conservatory Garden, the Center Garden features hallmarks of its classic Italian design, geometric shaped vegetation, and fountains. The Italian garden is a popular site for wedding photography. In spring, its the fitting floral backdrop to the annual Frederick Law Olmsted Awards Luncheon of the Conservancy's Women's Committee.

Location

Inside Conservatory Garden, East Side from 104th-106th streets; enter at Fifth Avenue and 105th street, or 106th St. gate inside Park


Conservatory Garden


Conservatory Garden in Central Park

 

The Conservatory Garden is Central Park's six-acre formal garden. It is divided into three smaller gardens, each with a distinct style: Italian, French, and English. The Garden's main entrance is through the Vanderbilt Gate, on Fifth Avenue between 104th and 105th Streets. This magnificent iron gate, made in Paris in 1894, originally stood before the Vanderbilt mansion at Fifth Avenue and 58th Street.

The Italianate center garden is composed of a large lawn surrounded by yew hedges and is bordered by two exquisite allées of spring-blooming pink and white crabapple trees. A 12-foot high jet fountain plays on the western end of the lawn, backed by tiered hedges and stairs that lead up to a wisteria pergola. On the walkway under the pergola are medallions inscribed with the names of the original 13 states.

The northern, French-style garden showcases parterres of germander and spectacular seasonal displays of spring tulips, and Korean chrysanthemums in autumn, all within an ellipse of Japanese holly. In the center is the charming Three Dancing Maidens fountain by German sculptor, Walter Schott. To the south is the very intimate English-style garden. There are five mixed borders of trees, shrubs and perennial plants, and five seasonal beds featuring spring bulbs that are followed by annual flower displays. A slope of woodland plants lines the western edge of this garden. At the center is sculptor Bessie Potter Vonnoh's lovely Frances Hodgeson Burnett Memorial Fountain, a tribute to the author of the children's book, The Secret Garden. The children — a girl and a boy, said to depict Mary and Dickon, the main characters from the classic — stand at one end of a small water lily pool. 

The Conservatory Garden is an officially designated Quiet Zone and offers a calm and colorful setting for a leisurely stroll, and intimate wedding, or an escape with a good book.

For many years the garden was tended by volunteers from the Garden Club of America and in 1983 it was restored by the Central Park Conservancy.

Location

East Side from 104th-106th Streets. Enter at Fifth Avenue and 105th Street, or 106th Street gate inside the Park.

» Map It

Details

Hours: 8am to dusk

Wheelchair access at 106th St. gate inside Park

Restroom available

Quiet Zone (dogs must be leashed and kept on pathways at all times; no running, rollerblading, or bike riding; no organized, active recreation or sports allowed; headphones required for radios)


North Woods


North Woods

 

Perhaps the most secluded and peaceful area of Central Park, the North Woods (located at Central Park's northwest corner) offers a taste of the Adirondack Mountains just a few subway stops away from Times Square.

The North Woods is one of the Park's three woodlands (along with the Ramble and Hallett Nature Sanctuary), offering people and wildlife an oasis of nature in the middle of New York City. The heart of the North Woods is the Ravine. Fallen trees, or snags, are left where they land (unless hazardous or obscuring paths), providing nutrients to surrounding plants, homes to wildlife and a natural look to the landscape.

Once entering through the magnificent rustic Glen Span Arch at the eastern edge of the Pool (between 100th and 103rd Streets), Park visitors are treated to a view of the Loch, a stream rebuilt by the Conservancy in the 1990s. The North Woods is a favorite spot of birdwatchers and hikers. Free guided tours are available regularly. You can learn more about the North Woods, and the Park's other woodlands (the Ramble and the Hallett Nature Sanctuary), through one of our Woodland Discovery Programs.

Location

East Side to Mid-Park from 101nd - 110nd Streets.


Blockhouse


The Blockhouse in Central Park

 

Central Park's oldest building, the Blockhouse is also the only remaining fortification of the many built in 1814 to defend against the British. It stands on the edge of a high precipice above the lower topography of Harlem. The rugged stone structure once had a sunken wooden roof and mobile cannon that could be deployed quickly. Today, the Blockhouse is empty, roofless, and securely locked.

Location

West Side at 109th Street and Central Park West.






Shakespeare Garden


Shakespeare Garden in Central Park

 

Shakespeare Garden is a four-acre landscape is named for the famed English poet and playwright. The garden is features flowers and plants mentioned in his poems and plays, with small bronze plaques scattered throughout the garden with quotes from the Bard.

The garden was first conceived in the 1880s when park commissioner George Clausen asked the Park's entomologist to create a garden adjacent to the nature study center in the Swedish Cottage. In 1913, Commissioner Gaynor dedicated it officially to the works of Shakespeare. After years of neglect, Shakespeare Garden, just as most of Central Park, fell into disrepair. In 1987, Central Park Conservancy restored and expanded the garden, repaving pathways and installing rustic wooden benches and bronze plaques with quotations from the Bard's masterpiece.

Location

West Side between 79th and 80th Streets.



The Ramble


The Ramble

 

To use the words of Park designer Frederick Law Olmsted, The Ramble is a 38-acre "wild garden."  Central Park's designers imagined a tranquil spot where visitors could stroll, discover forest gardens rich with plantings, and meander along the paths. This truly is a place for the urban explorer to escape the city and get utterly lost in nature.

This was one of the first parts of the Park to be built, and except for the bedrock platform, it is totally artificial. Even the water running in the stream and the adjacent Lake is turned on and off like a faucet. Some of the trees you see date back to 1859 when the Ramble was planted.

Beneath the leafy canopy, you are surrounded by a thriving wildlife habitat. Because of its location on the Atlantic Flyway — the migration route birds follow in the spring and fall — the Ramble is the center of birding activity in the Park. Over 230 species have been spotted, and over 40 other species remain in the Park all year long.

Every year, more than 25 million people visit Central Park, which is more than any other urban Park in the world. By working with environmental groups, the Central Park Conservancy has developed a woodland restoration and management plan, which involves your participation as well.

First, "carry in, carry out."  All of the trash and recycling bins have been removed from inside the Ramble, and placed at the entrances. If you enjoy a picnic in this beautiful setting, don't forget to take your leftovers with you and dispose of them properly. It's a simple gesture, but it really helps the environment and the Conservancy staff responsible for its care.

Location

Mid-Park from 73rd to 79th Streets.

» Map It



Belvedere Castle


Belvedere Castle in Central Park

 

Calvert Vaux, co-designer of Central Park, created the miniature castle in 1869 as one of its many whimsical structures intended as a lookout to the reservoir to the north (now the Great Lawn) and the Ramble to the south. Belvedere provides the best and highest views of the Park and its cityscape. It's fitting, considering its name translates to "beautiful view" in Italian. 





"Right now, the temperature in Central Park is..." Since 1919, the National Weather Service has taken measurements onf New York's weather from the castle's tower with the aid of scientific instruments that measure wind speed and direction. In a fenced-in compound just south of the castle, other data such as the rainfall is recorded and sent to the weather service's forecast office at Brookhaven National Library on Long Island. After decades of deterioration, Central Park Conservancy renovated and reopened the castle in 1983 as a visitor center.

Location

Mid-Park at 79th Street

» Map It

Details

Open Hours:

10am-5pm daily, except Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day

Phone: [masked]



Bethesda Fountain


Bethesda Fountain in Central Park

 

Rising from Bethesda Terrace is Bethesda Fountain, with the famous Angel of the Waters statue atop. The statue references the Gospel of John, which describes an angel blessing the Pool of Bethesda and giving it healing powers. The fountain commemorates the Croton water system, which first brought fresh water to New York City in 1842. The angel carries a lily in her left hand — a symbol of the water's purity, very important to a city that had previously suffered from a devastating cholera epidemic before the system was established. The piece is the only statue that was commissioned for the Park. Created by Emma Stebbins, it also marked the first time a woman received a public art commission in New York City.


Mid-Park on the north side of 72nd Street




SUBWAY DIRECTION : 

TAKE # 6 TO 96 STREET AND WALK TOWARDS TO 5th Ave or Take M 86 bus from there. 


Bus: 

 M-1,M-2,M-3 and M-4 : Madison Ave bus to 96 street and walk one block to 5th Ave.


WE HAVE A ANOTHER EVENT THIS AFTERNOON AT 6 :00PM,IF YOU LIKE TO JOIN IN THAT EVENT, GO TO THAT EVENT  PAGE AND BUY YOUR FREE TICKET. AFTER WE FINISHED WALK, WE TAKE TRAIN TO 16 ST AND 6 TH AVE AND HAVE A PIZZA SLICE EACH FOR 0.99 CENTS AND THEN WE ATTEND THIS  EVENT. BE SURE YOU BUY YOUR FREE TICKET AND DO RSVP AFTER THAT.


Enjoy an OMNY Taiko Drumming Concert!


See you at Enjoy an OMNY Taiko Drumming Concert!

Make it a great Meetup… Spread the word!


Saturday, April 19, 2014

at 6:00 PM

Baruch College Mason Hall Auditorium

17 Lexington Ave (& 23rd St)

New York, NY


http://www.meetup.com/FREE-IN-NYC/events/177222472/#event-comments-section


Join or login to comment.

  • Howard

    Thanks to both coaches for organizing the event . It was a nice day and the group was great.

    1 · April 19, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    GORGEOUS day and it was great meeting so many nice people. I uploaded some iPhone shots. I will upload dslr ones in next day or so. Thanks for a great day. :)

    1 · April 19, 2014

  • Elaine L.

    Nice people, nice weather, it was great meetup.

    1 · April 19, 2014

  • Jacqueline

    I'm sorry I missed the email address mentioned to send the notice to

    April 17, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Where are we actually meeting to begin though ? I don't see that anywhere.

    April 16, 2014

    • Coach BAIJNATH A.

      its written where location: CENTRAL PARK : 5 th Ave and 96 street
      Sidewalk of 5th Ave/96 st.
      New York, NY (edit map)

      We meet at the corner of 5th Ave and 96 street.Near the Bus stop.You find sitting in chair around there.

      1 · April 16, 2014

    • Coach BAIJNATH A.

      There is other event after walk: You might interested to join : Please check outat our other meetup group http://www.meetup.com...­ WE HAVE A ANOTHER EVENT THIS AFTERNOON AT 6 :00PM,IF YOU LIKE TO JOIN IN THAT EVENT, GO TO THAT EVENT PAGE AND BUY YOUR FREE TICKET. AFTER WE FINISHED WALK, WE TAKE TRAIN TO 16 ST AND 6 TH AVE AND HAVE A PIZZA SLICE EACH FOR 0.99 CENTS AND THEN WE ATTEND THIS EVENT. BE SURE YOU BUY YOUR FREE TICKET AND DO RSVP AFTER THAT.

      Enjoy an OMNY Taiko Drumming Concert!

      See you at Enjoy an OMNY Taiko Drumming Concert!

      Make it a great Meetup… Spread the word!

      Saturday, April 19, 2014

      at 6:00 PM

      Baruch College Mason Hall Auditorium

      17 Lexington Ave (& 23rd St)

      New York, NY

      http://www.meetup.com...­

      April 16, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Looking forward to this. Hope the snow didn't affect the blooms. :)

    April 16, 2014

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