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Marietta Preppers Networking Group Message Board › Link: Should I Vacuum Package Food at Home?

Link: Should I Vacuum Package Food at Home?

A former member
Post #: 19
Ron
user 74463362
Marietta, GA
Post #: 1
Personally, I think it is a good idea. I purchased a decent vacuum sealer and it seems to do a very good job. A vacuum sealer removes a great deal of the air, some moisture, and reduces the overall package size (footprint). On the other hand it makes formerly flexible packages such as rice or beans into a smaller but denser package. I haven't had the system long enough to give any first hand experience as to the long term storage potential, but it has to be better than the standard plastic bag approach.

Does anyone have any thoughts about adding oxygen absorber packs to vacuum sealed food?
A former member
Post #: 20
From my research, it appears that vacuum seal bags, unlike mylar bags, will allow oxygen and moisture to pass through slowly over time. If you plan to store food in vacuum seal bags for a long period of time, it probably wouldn't hurt to include a 100cc Oxy Absorber or two. Alternatively, you can also vacuum seal dry foods in mason jars, which will not allow oxygen or moisture to pass through. Of course, you may or may not like the idea of storing non-canned foods in fragile glass jars.
Ron
user 74463362
Marietta, GA
Post #: 2
Rick,

I did some additional research and found two possible methods for sealing and evacuating mylar bags using food service sealer which I have. The sealer I have has two settings allowing for both/either heat seal/and/or vacuum seal. The following link shows two videos one right after another that indicate that it might be possible to vacuum and heat seal mylar bags with two different methods. Please take a look and give me your thoughts. I will probably try this if I can find some mylar bags.


http://dehydrate2stor...­

Jeff O.
user 64547752
Marietta, GA
Post #: 5
We've used a food saver for over two years now and love the ability to store meats we find on sale for up to six months. Admittedly, this is food that is in our normal usage cycle. We've packaged some home made granola bars that have stored well up to three months without any loss of color or taste.

For longer storage we're learning to use a pressure canner and mylar. The canning is coming along nicely, only a few issues with the jars not sealing or most of the liquid being pulled out during the process. Seeing much better results with each new batch. The mylar is also a learning process; since we get excellent vacuum in most bags, I can only assume my methodology isn't consistent. I've heard of a vacuum canner that will seal traditional canning jars but haven't seen video or reads comment as of yet. Anyone familiar with this method?
Ron
user 74463362
Marietta, GA
Post #: 3
Jeff,

I have ordered some mylar bags and will try the sealing methods referenced in my response to Al above. I will let everyone know whether it is a pass or fail. I am interested in this method for dried foods such as beans, rice, peas, barley, lentils, etc.

Ron
A former member
Post #: 4
Jeff, we use a vacuum canner and it works fabulously!!! It is a attachment that hooks onto our FoodSaver Vacuum Sealer. You use it with a regular quart jar with lid and ring (it doesn't work with the permanent tattler lids - only the disposable lids).

We use it for all our dry food (pretzels, snackfoods, cereals) as well as wet food (opened/partially used spaghetti sauce, salsa, etc.) Typically when you leave a partially opened jar of sauce or salsa or applesauce or whatever in the frig, it goes bad within about a week. If you vacuum seal it and put it back in the frig, it lasts months...amazing! I highly recommend it :)

Wanda
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