Read "The Lady Tasting Tea".

  • August 11, 2012 · 11:00 AM
  • This location is shown only to members

From Amazon.com, "At a summer tea party in Cambridge, England, a lady states that tea poured into milk tastes differently than that of milk poured into tea. Her notion is shouted down by the scientific minds of the group. But one guest, by the name Ronald Aylmer Fisher, proposes to scientifically test the lady's hypothesis. There was no better person to conduct such a test. For Fisher had brought to the field of statistics an emphasis on controlling the methods for obtaining data and the importance of interpretation. He knew that how the data was gathered and applied was as important as the data themselves.

In The Lady Tasting Tea, readers will encounter not only Ronald Fisher's theories (and their repercussions), but the ideas of dozens of men and women whose revolutionary work affects our everyday lives. Writing with verve and wit, author David Salsburg traces the rise and fall of Karl Pearson's theories, explores W. Edwards Deming's statistical methods of quality control (which rebuilt postwar Japan's economy), and relates the story of Stella Cunliff's early work on the capacity of small beer casks at the Guinness brewing factory."

The Lady Tasting Tea is not a book of dry facts and figures, but the history of great individuals who dared to look at the world in a new way.

Join or login to comment.

  • CJ F.

    We had 5 people attend! We discussed several options for future books. I suggested Banash Hoffman's "About Vectors" it is a real math book but at the conceptual level and requiring no real prerequisites (best if you know a bit about vectors). Nick suggested "Naive Set Theory" by Paul Halmos which sounds like it is also a real math book but at the conceptual level. Jay is going to get back to us about a book by Gerard. Vinay suggested "The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement" by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and "Logicomix: An Epic Search for Truth" by Apostolos Doxiadis which is a graphic novel about the foundational quest in mathematics.

    What other suggestions for the next meetup do people have? Where should we discuss this? We didn't talk about frequency. Bi-monthly might be good enough to start. Monthly after we grow membership?

    August 11, 2012

    • Nick H

      If we wanted to go a more philosophical route, I have always intended to read this: http://www.amazon.com...­

      August 12, 2012

    • A former member
      A former member

      I also suggested "The man who knew Infinity" by Robert Kanigel. It is a biography of Ramanujam, but offers some nice conceptual explanation of some problems.

      August 12, 2012

  • CJ F.

    I thought the book's lack of a strong thesis hindered the conversation. But it was great to meet other math people. Let's make this work!

    August 11, 2012

  • CJ F.

    Notes done. Questions prepared. Add sunscreen and get on the bike. So you in an hour!

    August 11, 2012

  • CJ F.

    Jeannie and I are planning to be there. I hope I can finish taking notes today ...

    August 10, 2012

  • Matt

    Visiting a friend. Have fun guys.

    August 9, 2012

  • CJ F.

    Faith, I do not have time until 4 Aug. I recommend sending an e-mail to [masked]. You might be able to do it via e-mail.

    July 22, 2012

  • CJ F.

    I finished reading the book. I do not know if I will have time to take notes before the meetup. The library is letting me keep the book until the 21st of Aug. Woot!

    July 22, 2012

  • CJ F.

    Inter-Library loan found me a copy! I'll be picking it up tomorrow. I should be able to read it by the 11th, but probably I will have to return it to the library by then. I'll just have to take notes :)

    June 22, 2012

  • CJ F.

    Faith, I believe the founder of the BTFS asked the owner. I met the owner and I am sure he would welcome us (he was there during part of last Sunday's meetup). So I'd recommend reaching out to him for his blessing. However, I expect our group will be small enough that we could "just show up" without a problem. BTFS often gets 8-12 people to attend, we will be lucky when we get 10 to join the group let alone attend :)

    June 13, 2012

  • CJ F.

    The Ben Franklin Thinking Society has been meeting at Capriccio Cafe & Espresso Bar at 110 N. 16th Street , Philadelphia, PA. It is centrally located and the owner seems to like supporting meetups.

    June 12, 2012

  • CJ F.

    August works well for me too. Mid-August slightly better.

    June 11, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Saw your remark about a July date - how about early August? No to be totally selfish, but I'll be in Austria the month of July, but I'd really like to join y'all.

    1 · June 11, 2012

  • CJ F.

    The book sounds great. But my local library does not have a copy. I hope the date is scheduled at least 3-4 week out so I can try to get a copy and read it.

    June 5, 2012

6 went

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Create a Meetup Group and meet new people

Get started Learn more
Henry

I decided to start Reno Motorcycle Riders Group because I wanted to be part of a group of people who enjoyed my passion... I was excited and nervous. Our group has grown by leaps and bounds. I never thought it would be this big.

Henry, started Reno Motorcycle Riders

Start your Meetup today

Act now and get 50% off.
Until February 1.

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy