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NJ Craft Beer Friends Message Board › U.S. BREWERS WAKE UP TO THE TASTE OF GERMANY’S SOUR ALES

U.S. BREWERS WAKE UP TO THE TASTE OF GERMANY’S SOUR ALES

Mark E
user 12336721
Basking Ridge, NJ
Post #: 34
"For decades, American brewers have infused foreign beer traditions with boldness and innovation — by re-imagining the moderately bitter English IPA as the hop-saturated Titan of the U.S. craft-beer pantheon, for example. Now they’re doing it again with Germany’s little-known sour ales — its goses and Berliner weisses, primarily — reviving their characteristic lemony acidity and often pairing it with other ingredients, from fresh coriander flowers (in Almanac’s case) to passion fruit. The result: low-alcohol beers whose intensity of flavors are matched only by their ability to refresh."
"It’s a beer worth getting to know. The Great Sour Awakening, after all, isn’t about to disappear, and Sebastian Sauer, for one, thinks he knows where things are headed. “I’m very sure,” he says, “that sour ales will be the new IPA.”"
U.S. BREWERS WAKE UP TO THE TASTE OF GERMANY’S SOUR ALES

The Beer Nut: A primer on German-style beers
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