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Alloy Orchestra: "Nosferatu"­ (1922)@ Boston University's Tsai Performance Center

Come join Nerd Fun to see this free showing of the silent film horror classic "Nosferatu", backed by the Alloy Orchestra!
From Boston University's Tsai Performance Center site:
http://www.bu.edu/tsa... "Starts: 7:30 pm on Thursday, November 4, 2010 "Ends: 10:00 pm on Thursday, November 4, 2010 "Location: Tsai Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Avenue "Enjoy a live musical accompaniment by the Boston-based Alloy Orchestra to this classic German Expressionist film directed by F. W. Murnau. It stars Max Schreck as the vampire Count Orlock. This 1922 film was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s 'Dracula.' Sponsored by CAS Core Curriculum; this event is free and open to the BU community".
Where to Meet: Care to grab a bite to eat? T.J. Maher will hanging around the Union Court Food Court inside the George Sherman Union building on 775 Commonwealth Ave from 5:30 pm to 6:45 pm. Restaurants in the food court are listed at
http://www.bu.edu/din... ... it looks like the Food Court is a block away from the Tsai Performance Center:
http://maps.google.co... We should probably meet up with the people who don't want to grab dinner at 6:50 pm meeting at whereever the main entrance is located, and head in as a group to grab seats at 7:00 pm for this 7:30 pm performance. T.J. Maher is 5 foot 7, with short brown hair, blue eyes, a "Hello My Name is T.J." nametag, and a red MEETUP sign attached to his black messenger bag.
About the Tsai Performance Center:
http://www.bu.edu/tsa... "Completed in 1989, the Tsai Performance Center defines the ideal performance space for concerts, theatrical and dance presentations, lectures, film programs, and conferences. "Situated in the College of Arts and Sciences building, at the heart of the Boston University campus, the Tsai Performance Center radiates simple warmth and elegance. It features fully supported sound and lighting systems to meet the demands of the most complex events. With a maximum seating capacity of 515, this proscenium stage offers excellent sightlines that enable you to appreciate the onstage performance from every seat in the house". A seating chart can be found at
http://www.bu.edu/tsa...
About the Alloy Orchestra:
http://www.alloyorche... "[Alloy Orchestra] is a three man musical ensemble, writing and performing live accompaniment to classic silent films. Working with an outrageous assemblage of peculiar objects, they thrash and grind soulful music from unlikely sources. "Performing at prestigious film festivals and cultural centers in the US and abroad (The Telluride Film Festival, The Louvre, Lincoln Center, The Academy of Motion Pictures, the National Gallery of Art and others), Alloy has helped revive some of the great masterpieces of the silent era. "An unusual combination of found percussion and state-of-the-art electronics gives the Orchestra the ability to create any sound imaginable. Utilizing their famous "rack of junk" and electronic synthesizers, the group generates beautiful music in a spectacular variety of styles. They can conjure up a French symphony or a simple German bar band of the 20's. The group can make the audience think it is being attacked by tigers, contacted by radio signals from Mars or swept up in the Russian Revolution. "Alloy collaborates with some of the worlds best archives and collectors (such as the George Eastman House, The British Film Institute, Paramount pictures, Film Preservation Associates and The Douris Corporation) to present audiences with the very best available prints of some of history's greatest film "[...] The Alloy Orchestra began their love affair with silent films with an original score for Metropolis in 1991. In the intervening years, the group has written scores for 28 feature length film presentations, typically premiering their new scores at the Telluride Film Festival in Colorado. The group has performed more than a thousand shows around the world, and has traveled to a dozen foreign countries". ... According to a reviewer of the Alloy Orchestra's album "Silents", on Amazon.com, "Of all the bands playing that accompany silent films (and there are more than a few out there), none are better than the
Alloy Orchestra. Simply put, the Boston-based band has an incredible sense of humor, cinematic timing, and a great sound. Perhaps it's the instrumentation: Alloy utilize oddball percussion (fire extinguishers, old pipe) and the occasional sampler sound effects. The group's music never sounds dated, and yet, somehow, it never dates the movie it accompanies. Silents is some of the ensemble's best work, a compilation featuring music written for five different classic silent films". You can listen to a few selections on the Amazon.com site, also ...
http://www.amazon.com... ... You can go to
http://www.alloyorche... to get a tour schedule. It appears that on March 5, 2011, they are being presented by World Music / Crash Arts to perform for a screening of Metropolis at the Somerville Theater.
About Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922), according to Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.o... "Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (translated as Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror; also known as Nosferatu: A Symphony of Terror or simply Nosferatu) is a German Expressionist horror film, directed by F. W. Murnau, starring Max Schreck as the vampire Count Orlok. The film, shot in 1921 and released in 1922, was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula, with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel (for instance, "vampire" became "Nosferatu" and "Count Dracula" became "Count Orlok"). "Nosferatu was ranked twenty-first in Empire magazine's "The 100 Best Films of World Cinema" in 2010. "Filming began in July 1921, with exterior shots in Wismar.[6] A take from Marienkirche's tower over Wismar marketplace with the Wasserkunst Wismar served as the establishing shot for the Wisborg scene. Other locations were the Wassertor, the Heiligen-Geist-Kirche yard and the harbour. In Lübeck, the abandoned Salzspeicher served as Nosferatu's new Wisborg house. Further exterior shots followed in Lauenburg, Rostock and on Sylt. The film team travelled to the Carpathian Mountains, where Orava Castle served as backdrop for Orlok's half-ruined castle. "[...] The movie has received not only a strong cult following, but also has received overwhelmingly positive reviews, including being cited[by whom?] as the best of all the adaptations of Dracula. On Rottentomatoes.com it received a "Certified Fresh" label and holds a 98 percent "fresh" rating based on 46 reviews". ... You may have heard Nosferatu referenced when Willam DeFoe played a ficticious version of the actor Max Schreck in "Shadow of the Bat" exploring the question, what if the method actor who played Count Orlok may have been a real vampire?
Trailer for Nosferatu (In German):
http://www.imdb.com/v...
Directions:
http://www.bu.edu/tsa... The Tsai Performance Center is next to Boston University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. According to their website, the closest MBTA stop is the Boston University East Station which is on the "B" branch of the Green Line. Metered parking is located all along Commonwealth Ave.

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  • Rick

    Never seen this film before, strange yet interesting how rudimentary films were back 90 years ago.

    November 5, 2010

  • Ron N.

    Excellent movie and performance!

    November 5, 2010

  • T.J. M.

    This was wonderful. With the three musicians, a saw played with a bow became a spooky theramin like instrument adding athmosphere. Large chines became church bells. The tinkle of small chimes represented birds twittering in the dawn. The accordian provided the base of the background score. Cymbals clash. Gongs get rung. It was a fantastic experience. It was so good seeing the film -- although it was on DVD -- with new updated English titles.

    November 5, 2010

  • Ron N.

    Great event!

    November 5, 2010

  • T.J. M.

    Thank you Drew for finding this event, and thank you Ron for finding a place to eat beforehand!

    November 2, 2010

  • Ron N.

    BU's George Sherman Union, a couple blocks west at 775 Comm. Ave., has a large food court.

    November 1, 2010

  • T.J. M.

    Where can we drop in and grab something to eat from 5:45 pm to 7:00 pm?

    November 1, 2010

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