Nerd Fun - Boston Message Board Nerd Fun - Boston - Event Related Discussion › NERD FUN: Why rsvp YES and then not come?

NERD FUN: Why rsvp YES and then not come?

Kieran
user 6071263
Arlington, MA
Post #: 29
My personal approach to RSVPing.

1. If the event is a few weeks away and I'm a maybe, I'll RSVP YES to hold a spot and note it on my calendar. Not that hard considering there's Outlook, Google Calendar, and whoa, even a paper calendar on the fridge!

2. As soon as I am fairly certain I won't be able to go, I change RSVP to NO. If three days before the event I see there's a big waiting list and I'm still a maybe, I'll RSVP NO, because it's just polite to not take up a spot.

3. Crap happens: Running way too late, dog ate my homework, met a handsome rich Nigerian prince on the way, etc. I will call or send an email to the organizer asap with a short explanation of why I didn't make it. This takes less than a minute to do and he or she won't be left wondering.

It really isn't all that hard if more people take responsibility for themselves. I don't think any of the things I've posted above is that difficult to do.
Brian
user 10766866
Boston, MA
Post #: 3
I suppose I am the opposite problem.
Knowing that I never know what I will be doing or how I will feel in advance I never say yes to any event, but if the mood takes me I might show up regardless. Now that I know there will be plenty of free spots for me at any event I should make this a rule to live by smile
Heather
sacajawea
Group Organizer
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 188
I <3 funny

met a handsome rich Nigerian prince on the way, etc.

A former member
Post #: 26
As an event organizer for several meet-up groups, I can say that this is a real problem, especially when you have reserved a room or a table, are waiting on people before you leave for a hike or have a limited number of tickets for something.

I usually put my cell phone number in the info and ask people to PLEASE text me - even at the last minute - if they aren't going to show. But at my last hike, 4 (out of 7) people simply didn't show, even though I sent out a reminder email the morning of. I listed them as "no-shows" and if they do it too much, they will be removed from the group.

I wish the "Maybe" option was back, too...for some events it is really appropriate. The organizer can always choose to disable it.

I am an Organizer for a few groups and an AO in a couple more, and I could have easily written the exact same thing.

When I first started as an Organizer, I had an average attendance rate of about 80%. But it didn't take long for that number to drop, first to around 70%, then to 50%, where I would say it stands now. Sometimes, there is a legitimate reason - like a breakdown, or traffic, or weather, etc. But when you start seeing an attendance rate below 60%, you do start to wonder.

One thing I have noticed, is that the groups that have a "core" membership - i.e., people who go to a majority, if not almost all, of the events, tend to have higher attendance rates. I believe this may be the result, both of the increased connection members may feel with each other, and hence the group, and the increased "peer pressure" to show up when you say you will. Contrast this with groups where there are rarely more than 2-3 of the same people at any given event, or where events are so large that people can't really connect - there is a much weaker sense of community, which I believe results in a much weaker or nonexistent sense of responsibility to the group and the organizers.

I would also suggest being careful with the limited attendance events. Even before Meetup made the mistake of eliminating the "maybe" option, I noticed that limited capacity events tended to have a higher percentage of no-shows. Probably because more people want to make sure to reserve their spot, likely leading to a little less care about the decision to RSVP yes in the first place.

In addition, I have also noticed that removing people for no-shows and constantly reminding everyone about the need to keep RSVPs updated (and I do mean CONSTANTLY), does seem to have a positive effect on attendance figures.
A former member
Post #: 33
I now tend not to consider going to most Nerd Fun events, precisely because the RSVP lists are so long that I don't think I'll enjoy them.

That said, I think it might be worth considering whether open-attendance RSVP lists really work. I know when I see an event capped at, say, 12 or 15 or 20 people, and a waiting list, I take the RSVP that much more seriously, and I think others may see it the same way.

Any open-attendance event is a turnoff for me and most of my friends. Seriously, what's the difference between going with 100 Meetup people and just going on my own?

I am an organizer for another group and cap all events, with 20 being the most I'm willing to try to "herd" (and this is only for a non-reservation event). I constantly get complaints that more spots can't be opened, but given the no-show percentage it's just a waste of my time to open it up because I often end up with the same original # of spots filled anyway.

As for waiting lists, by the time someone decides they cannot attend it's often so late that those on the wait list have made other plans and cannot attend. I really dislike people holding spots by Rsvp'ing yes but ditching their commitment when something else better comes along, robbing someone else who really wanted to attend to join the group.
A former member
Post #: 34
Because shit happens. I always change my rsvp to no if I can't make it.. but sometimes there are situations that make it impossible to do that. Really.. shit happens, its nothing personal and that is the only reason. I work for two other meetup groups and the trend of no shows is present there and in every other group. No reason to be upset about it.


There is a difference between a true "shit happens" moment and basic rudeness. And it's often obvious who is rude and who isn't.
A former member
Post #: 7
Because shit happens. I always change my rsvp to no if I can't make it.. but sometimes there are situations that make it impossible to do that. Really.. shit happens, its nothing personal and that is the only reason. I work for two other meetup groups and the trend of no shows is present there and in every other group. No reason to be upset about it.


There is a difference between a true "shit happens" moment and basic rudeness. And it's often obvious who is rude and who isn't.

I disagree...
Aside from talking about people who RSVP yes to everything and never show up... shit does just happen. Shit can consistently happen with some people, but at that point, they shouldn't be members of a meetup group anyways. It's a priority thing... not a rudeness thing. Sorry, but there is no such thing as rudeness on the interweb. It's incredibly hard, neigh, impossible to sort between rude and shit happens categories. Until you have a 'bullshit' meter, it's best to just assume that something critical came up, and in meetup groups- anything that isn't a 'fun time activity' that could occur in ones life will trump a meetup any day.
Also.. why the big deal? You wouldn't want to be friends or make connections with people like that if they annoy you, amirite?
Liz
user 13542536
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 2
Yeah, this is a great point about missing the time to meet beforehand somewhere and then walk over (versus the 'official start time'). I am running something for another (much smaller) group where some folks want to meet for dinner beforehand -- before a show. I asked people to say in the RSVP whether they want to do that, but how about asking the folks at meetup.com to provide a way to distinctly separate out the "meet here beforehand" details.
Heather
sacajawea
Group Organizer
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 189
Beca­use shit happens. I always change my rsvp to no if I can't make it.. but sometimes there are situations that make it impossible to do that. Really.. shit happens, its nothing personal and that is the only reason. I work for two other meetup groups and the trend of no shows is present there and in every other group. No reason to be upset about it.


There is a difference between a true "shit happens" moment and basic rudeness. And it's often obvious who is rude and who isn't.

I disagree...
Aside from talking about people who RSVP yes to everything and never show up... shit does just happen. Shit can consistently happen with some people, but at that point, they shouldn't be members of a meetup group anyways. It's a priority thing... not a rudeness thing. Sorry, but there is no such thing as rudeness on the interweb. It's incredibly hard, neigh, impossible to sort between rude and shit happens categories. Until you have a 'bullshit' meter, it's best to just assume that something critical came up, and in meetup groups- anything that isn't a 'fun time activity' that could occur in ones life will trump a meetup any day.
Also.. why the big deal? You wouldn't want to be friends or make connections with people like that if they annoy you, amirite?

Volunteer to run events and we'll see if you change your mind... this isn't the interweb ... this is real life - so rudeness has an impact on the organizers and the venues and events we attend.

The numbers on "no shows" is really high these days... I can't imagine that much shit is happenning.

again... glad for the dialogue

Heather
sacajawea
Group Organizer
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 190
AOs can list the dinner as a separate event... just a thought.

Yeah, this is a great point. I am running something for another (much smaller) group where some folks want to meet for dinner beforehand -- before a show. I asked people to say in the RSVP whether they want to do that, but how about asking the folks at meetup.com to provide a way to distinctly separate out the "meet here beforehand" details.

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