Nerd Fun - Boston Message Board Nerd Fun - Boston - Event Related Discussion › Isolated events- Why do events always end up highly isolated?

Isolated events- Why do events always end up highly isolated?

A former member
Post #: 102
I've noticed something really odd in online groups. More than 95% of events are somehow isolated to the group. Something like this does not happen by chance. I know this because I see everywhere else, outside of online groups, activities are usually not isolated.

Are people intentionally trying to stay isolated? Or, may not be comfortable with other people around? Or perhaps do people have very different interests from the rest of society?

Here's how people are staying isolated in many ways: activities that are always isolated, or going at less busy (and less convenient) times so less people are there, private room just for the group, or having unpopular interests.

For example, there are alot of hiking groups, but rarely any festivals or walking in the city. For nightlife, people go bowling, instead of clubs, or pool.

Or, events will be designed to be a reserved room just for the group. Once in a while it makes sense, but when it's every single time isolated, it does not make sense at all.

Events seem to be scheduled earlier or later than when most people normally go to that type of place. Tour events are late afternoon, instead of morning or early afternoon. Nightlife events are early afternoon, while cruises are in the evening. Happy hours are during the week, specifically missing is Friday and Saturday nights. People everywhere else are going at the exact opposite times.

Plus, I don't feel it would be wrong to meet external people. Plus, even if we havent met people, we are missing out on alot by not doing activities that others do, and at regular times. It is not a benefit to stay isolated all the time. Places plan their activities by when most people go to the places, so we do miss out by not going at regular times.

It seems everything is isolated, so why are people avoiding going out at regular times in regular setting?
Eric
user 8776856
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 4
In all honesty (meaning without sarcasm) I schedule events when they are happening in the real world and have no control over when the museum of science or any other group is putting on a lecture and generous enough to let us in for free.
A former member
Post #: 1
Vip - maybe you should consider starting a Meetup group of your own? Since it sounds like you don't like the way this group is coordinated. There's supposed to be something for everyone on Meetup!
John
user 4649035
Leominster, MA
Post #: 61
Just a suggestion: Google "homophily ".

This is a well-observed phenomenon (going back to the 1950's). It's currently getting a lot of buzz on the internet (and other media), especially because social networks seem to be promoting our tendency to gather or participate in groups that reflect our own characteristics and opinions rather than encouraging us to stretch our horizons and seek out others who are different from ourselves.

In short, counter-intuitively, the world wide web may be facilitating isolating behavior (at least isolating in terms of highly cohesive groups) rather than inclusive behavior.

Here's a couple of interesting links:

http://www.analytictech.com/mgt780/topics/homophily.htm­

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/10/magazine/10Section2a.t-4.html?_r=0­

Was that answer nerdy enough for you?

biggrin
John
user 4649035
Leominster, MA
Post #: 62
I also think that sometimes organizers have to set up special arrangements with a venue because having a huge group just show up at a usually busy time would be rather difficult for the operators of the venue. Just common courtesy.smile
Eric
user 8776856
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 5
Just a suggestion: Google "homophily ".

This is a well-observed phenomenon (going back to the 1950's). It's currently getting a lot of buzz on the internet (and other media), especially because social networks seem to be promoting our tendency to gather or participate in groups that reflect our own characteristics and opinions rather than encouraging us to stretch our horizons and seek out others who are different from ourselves...

biggrin
I'm not sure the observed "phenomenon" actually exists. (ok, I am sure... it doesn't)
A former member
Post #: 105
I learned the term homophily. No, I do not believe this is the reason for online group's isolation. I have seen many events with mainstream interests, but people are scheduling them at "less busy" times.

I do not believe it is different interests that is the reason for isolation. When making any type of plans, people will be there, on average 70% or more of the time. If, somehow other people aren't around more than 95% of the time (as usually in online groups), there is some type of characteristic making this happen, and it's wrong. I really believe people in the online groups are avoiding people.

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Note:
-The idea of percentages (e.g. 70%) seems wrong. One should not keep any type of score or tracking. It's only approximate, but I believe in my point that things should not end up most of the time isolated unless it's intentional.
-Also, it's prevalent in all the online groups, not just this group. For example, there are alot of hiking groups, but few groups about festivals or places with people around.

Heather
sacajawea
Group Organizer
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 215
Perhaps "wingman" is the term we're trying to find here.
Mary
CompassRose71w
Brookline, MA
Post #: 4
I'm not sure what the problem is. By definition, meetup groups are for people with a common interest. If people attend a meetup event, it is presumably because they want to meet other people in the meetup group who share that commen interest. If you want to go to a festival or some other event and hang out with the general crowd instead of the meetup crowd, then just go to the festival. A "meetup" group that goes to a larger event with the intention of "mingling" with the general crowd would quickly disperse to groups of two or three, if that, defeating the purpose of gathering for a common interest with others with that interest. You're probably better off finding a friend or two and just go to a festival...no meetup required.
John
user 4649035
Leominster, MA
Post #: 63
Just a suggestion: Google "homophily ".

This is a well-observed phenomenon (going back to the 1950's). It's currently getting a lot of buzz on the internet (and other media), especially because social networks seem to be promoting our tendency to gather or participate in groups that reflect our own characteristics and opinions rather than encouraging us to stretch our horizons and seek out others who are different from ourselves...

biggrin
I'm not sure the observed "phenomenon" actually exists. (ok, I am sure... it doesn't)
So, (I'm interested) where do you think the old saying "birds of a feather flock together" comes from? Or do you think that saying is just nonsensical too? smile
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