NORTHERN NEW JERSEY PUG EXTRAVAGANZA! Message Board › INDEX:Updated Lists: Of SAFE PET FOOD, FDA, Itchmo, PetSitUSA Blog, and FOOD

INDEX:Updated Lists: Of SAFE PET FOOD, FDA, Itchmo, PetSitUSA Blog, and FOOD RECALLS~(Please check this thread Daily)

A former member
Post #: 580
Recall: Solid Gold Tiny Tots Dog Treat
October 21, 2008 at 9:25 am
Filed under Pet Food Recall, Dogs

On October 13 Solid Gold announced a recall of one of their dog treats…



Due to some instances of mold growth in a single batch of Tiny Tots, we have decided to voluntarily withdraw the entire production run from the market. We would like to assure our customers that there have been no reported serious health effects on dogs that have consumed Tiny Tots from this batch.

If you have a bag of Tiny Tots with a Best Before date of April 2009, please return it to your retail store for a full refund. No other batches of Tiny Tots or any of our other jerky treats are affected.

Solid Gold is committed to producing the healthiest food, treats, and supplements for your pet. As always, if you have any questions or concerns please contact us at 800-364-4863 or online at dane@solidgoldhealth.com.

From the Solid Gold website.
A former member
Post #: 608
Mars Petcare US Issues Voluntary Recall of a Limited Number of Bags of SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Sold at Wal-Mart locations in Fifteen States due to Potential Salmonella Contamination


October 27, 2008 at 5:15 pm · Filed under Pet Health, Pet Food Recall, Cats

Potential salmonella contamination prompts a recall from Mars Petcare…

FRANKLIN, Tenn. — October 27, 2008 — Mars Petcare US today announced a voluntary recall of a limited number of bags of SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Blend dry cat food sold at Wal-Mart locations in Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and West Virginia. The pet food is being voluntarily recalled following a positive test result indicating a potential contamination with Salmonella.

This product should not be sold or fed to pets. Pet owners should dispose of product in a safe manner (example, a securely covered trash receptacle) and return the empty bag to the store where purchased for a full refund.

Salmonella can cause serious infections in dogs and cats, and, if there is cross contamination caused by handling of the pet food, in people as well, especially children, the aged, and people with compromised immune systems. Healthy people potentially infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. On rare occasions, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Animals can be carriers with no visible symptoms and potentially infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

There have been no complaints or reports of illness resulting from consumption or handling of the recalled product.

Pet owners who have questions about the recall should call 1-877-568-4463 or visit visit www.petcare.mars.com.
Recalled Pet Food

Product: SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Blend Dry Cat Food
Best If Used By Date: AUG 11 09
Best By Date Location: Back of bag
Production Lot Code: 50 XXXX X (Found on back of bag just after “Best If Used By” date. Consumers should look for “50″ as the first two digits of the second line.)





UPC Code: UPC code numbers can be found directly underneath the bar code on the package. Please find recalled pet food UPC information below.

3.5 lb. - SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Blend - 81131 17546

7 lb. - SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Blend - 81131 17547

18 lb. - SPECIAL KITTY® Gourmet Blend - 81131 17548

Affected Stores: Wal-Mart locations in Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and West Virginia.

Contact Mars Petcare if you have questions about Special Kitty cat food. You can call 1-877-568-4463 or visit www.petcare.mars.com

Wal-Mart has supposedly removed all affected pet food from their shelves, but please double check before you buy any, and be sure to take a look at Special Kitty cat food you may have at home.


Click below to go to Mars Website;
http://petcare.mars.c...­
A former member
Post #: 546
Tainted animal feed destroyed in China
November 2, 2008 at 9:29 am
Filed under Pet Health, Pet Food Recall, Health

Tons of melamine tainted animal feed has been destroyed in China.

Chinese regulators said over the weekend that they had confiscated and destroyed more than 3,600 tons of animal feed tainted with melamine, an industrial chemical that has been blamed for contaminating food supplies in China and for leading to global recalls of Chinese dairy products.

In what appears to be the biggest food safety crackdown in years, the government also said Saturday that it had closed 238 illegal feed makers in a series of nationwide sweeps that involved more than 369,000 government inspectors.

The aggressive moves come amid growing worries that the Chinese animal feed industry could be contaminated by melamine, endangering the national food supply and posing a health threat to consumers.

Over the past week and a half, eggs produced in three different Chinese provinces were found to be tainted with high levels of melamine, a chemical commonly used to make plastic and fertilizer. And in September, melamine-tainted milk supplies were blamed for sickening more than 50,000 children and causing at least four deaths in China.

Regulators in the southern province of Guangdong, which is heavily populated with about 80 million people and is also a major manufacturing center near Hong Kong, said they had discovered six tons of melamine-tainted animal feed.

[…]

But government officials also said that China’s animal feed supply was largely safe and that the quality of feed had improved in recent years. They insisted that only a small number of rogue operators had deliberately added melamine to feed, often using it as cheap filler in order to save money.

The government said something similar early last year when several animal feed makers were caught exporting melamine-tainted feed ingredients to the United States and other countries, resulting in contaminated pet food supplies that sickened and killed cats and dogs.

[…]

The Chinese government has responded by firing high-ranking regulators and by arresting dozens of people suspected of intentionally adding melamine to milk supplies. The government has repeatedly promised to ensure the safety of the Chinese food supply.

But the nation’s food safety woes are troubling global food companies that import from China and consumers around the world who fear that melamine may turn up in their food. Although China is not a leading dairy exporter, it is one of the biggest food exporters in the world.

Here’s the rest.
A former member
Post #: 567
Nov. 24 Deadline to file claim related to pet food recall

November 5, 2008 at 9:23 pm
Filed under Pet Food Recall, Cats, Dogs

If your cat or dog became ill or died as a result of eating recalled pet food last year, you may be considering filing a claim against the pet food company. If so, you’ll need to do that soon. The deadline for filing the claim form for Americans is November 24; the deadline for Canadians is in January. The AVMA has posted this reminder.

A U.S. district court has granted final approval of a $24 million settlement to pay economic damages to the owners of cats and dogs that ate pet food subject to last year’s massive recalls.

The recalled pet food contained ingredients from China contaminated with melamine and melamine analogs, which apparently combined to impair renal function in cats and dogs.

Pet owners must file claims by Nov. 24 to receive compensation for economic damages from the settlement fund. The cash fund comes from U.S. and Canadian companies that supplied the ingredients in question or manufactured, distributed, or sold pet food containing the ingredients.

With documentation, consumers can receive up to a 100 percent cash payment of reasonable expenses that resulted from their purchase or their pet’s consumption of the recalled pet food. Consumers also can receive up to $900 for reasonable and valid economic damages for which they do not have documentation.

Valid expenses include food purchases, veterinary care, necropsy costs, the price of cremation or burial, the purchase price or fair market value of a pet that died or of a new pet, and other economic costs.

More information for both Americans and Canadians can be found here .
A former member
Post #: 591
F.D.A. Detains Chinese Imports for Testing
By GARDINER HARRIS and ANDREW MARTIN
Published: November 13, 2008

Candy, snacks, bakery products, pet food and other Chinese products that contain milk will be detained at the border until tests prove that they are not contaminated, the federal government announced Thursday.

The Food and Drug Administration said it issued the alert because of concern about such products being contaminated with the toxic chemical melamine. It was discovered in infant formula in September and has sickened more than 50,000 infants in China and killed at least four.

Since that time, melamine has been found in a wide range of other products, including milk, eggs and fish feed. As a result, companies in the United States have recalled several products generally sold in Asian specialty stores, including a nondairy creamer and Mr. Brown brands of instant coffee and tea. But to date, the contamination here was not thought to be widespread.

“We’re taking this action because it’s the right thing to do for the public health,” said Dr. Steven Solomon, a deputy associate F.D.A. commissioner.

But consumer advocates said the agency’s action was too little and too late.

“Although F.D.A.’s action today is a step in the right direction, it does not do enough to ensure consumer safety, especially since melamine contamination in Chinese products continues to broaden,” said Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch.

As a result of the latest alert, Chinese products that contain milk or milk powder will automatically be detained at the border until the manufacturer or its customer has the product tested and it is found to be free of contamination, or they show documentation indicating that the product does not contain milk or milk-derived ingredients.

“The burden shifts to the importer,” Dr. Solomon said.

F.D.A. analyses have detected melamine and cyanuric acid, another contaminant, in “a number of products that contain milk or milk-derived ingredients, including candy and beverages,” according to an alert that the agency sent to field personnel. The alert also noted that inspectors in more than 13 other countries had discovered melamine in Chinese products including milk, yogurt, frozen desserts, biscuits, chocolates and cookies.

The agency routinely blocks imports of individual food products, but it is rare for it to block an entire category of one country’s foods. Last year, the F.D.A. blocked five types of farm-raised seafood as well as vegetable protein from China because of repeated instances of contamination.

Unscrupulous food and feed dealers in China add melamine to their products because it increases nitrogen content to give the appearance in testing that protein levels are adequate. Because it dissolves poorly, melamine can block the body’s filtering system, potentially leading to kidney failure and death.

Dr. Solomon said the alert was likely to apply mostly to specialty products sold in Asian markets. But Benjamin England, a former lawyer at the agency, described the latest alert as “massive” and said it could affect “a tremendous amount of goods.”

“It’s going to jam the ports up all the way up the supply chain,” said Mr. England, who represents food supply companies.

As a result of the earlier alerts on seafood and vegetable protein, many private laboratories that perform product tests for F.D.A. review already have long waiting lists, Mr. England said. In addition, the agency takes three to four weeks to review submitted tests, Mr. England said, so delays in shipping will be significant.

The import alert could extend to Chinese shrimp, Mr. England said, because much of it is breaded and the breading could contain dairy products. China is also one of the world’s biggest makers of supplements, and some protein powders and shakes are made largely with powdered milk.

The effect of the alert is likely to be long-lasting, Mr. England said, because importers must prove that each and every shipment is free of contamination.

“It’s impossible to get off the alert list,” Mr. England said.

China exports a relatively small but growing amount of dairy products to the United States, about $13 million in 2007, most of which was casein, a dairy ingredient. (By contrast, New Zealand exported $697 million to the United States). But the figures do not include food products and dietary supplements that include milk or milk-derived ingredients, a potentially much larger universe.

“Today’s F.D.A. Import Alert on dairy products from China should have little or no impact on the U.S. dairy industry,” said Peggy Armstrong, a spokeswoman for the International Dairy Foods Association, a trade group. “Dairy imports from China account for less than 1 percent of total dairy products imported to this country annually.”

Representative Rosa DeLauro, Democrat of Connecticut, criticized the agency’s response, saying it should have acted sooner. The import alert should include egg and fish products “given that animal feed has been found to be contaminated with melamine,” she said in a release.

“Clearly, the problems involving melamine in China are significantly deeper than F.D.A. would have us believe,” Ms. DeLauro said.

The import detention order comes at a delicate time. Secretary of Health and Human Services Michael O. Leavitt and Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach, commissioner of the F.D.A. will travel next week to China to open agency offices in Beijing, Guangzhou and Shanghai. Months of negotiations were needed for it to gain permission to open offices there.

Michael Herndon, an agency spokesman, said the new import order “shouldn’t affect the opening of F.D.A. offices.”

Click below for the article in NY Times:
http://www.nytimes.co...­
A former member
Post #: 654
China destroys tons of tainted animal feed
By David Barboza Published: November 2, 2008

Tons of melamine tainted animal feed has been destroyed in China.

SHANGHAI: Chinese regulators said over the weekend that they had confiscated and destroyed more than 3,600 tons of animal feed tainted with melamine, an industrial chemical that has been blamed for contaminating food supplies in China and for leading to global recalls of Chinese dairy products.

In what appears to be the biggest food safety crackdown in years, the government also said Saturday that it had closed 238 illegal feed makers in a series of nationwide sweeps that involved more than 369,000 government inspectors.

The aggressive moves come amid growing worries that the Chinese animal feed industry could be contaminated by melamine, endangering the national food supply and posing a health threat to consumers.

Over the past week and a half, eggs produced in three different Chinese provinces were found to be tainted with high levels of melamine, a chemical commonly used to make plastic and fertilizer. And in September, melamine-tainted milk supplies were blamed for sickening more than 50,000 children and causing at least four deaths in China.

Regulators in the southern province of Guangdong, which is heavily populated with about 80 million people and is also a major manufacturing center near Hong Kong, said they had discovered six tons of melamine-tainted animal feed.

An official at the Agriculture Ministry said that the government would mete out harsh punishments to those who were deliberately adding melamine to animal feed.

"It is illegal for any individual or any enterprise to add melamine into feed, and we will crack down uncompromisingly on melamine," Wang Zhicai, director of the animal husbandry and livestock bureau at the Agriculture Ministry, said Saturday, according to a transcript of his news conference.

But government officials also said that China's animal feed supply was largely safe and that the quality of feed had improved in recent years. They insisted that only a small number of rogue operators had deliberately added melamine to feed, often using it as cheap filler in order to save money.

The government said something similar early last year when several animal feed makers were caught exporting melamine-tainted feed ingredients to the United States and other countries, resulting in contaminated pet food supplies that sickened and killed cats and dogs.

That case led to the largest pet-food recall in U.S. history. Melamine dealers in China said in interviews last year and as recently as Friday that it was not uncommon for animal feed operators to purchase melamine scrap, a cheaper form of melamine waste, and use it as filler.

A massive food safety campaign was announced in China late last year, with inspectors closing down thousands of substandard and illegal food and feed operators. And yet this year melamine has been found in animal feed, dairy products and eggs in China, triggering food recalls and warnings all over Asia and even in the United States.

The Chinese government has responded by firing high-ranking regulators and by arresting dozens of people suspected of intentionally adding melamine to milk supplies. The government has repeatedly promised to ensure the safety of the Chinese food supply.

But the nation's food safety woes are troubling global food companies that import from China and consumers around the world who fear that melamine may turn up in their food. Although China is not a leading dairy exporter, it is one of the biggest food exporters in the world.

Still, some food safety officials are asking consumers not to be too alarmed because although the melamine-contaminated eggs found in Hong Kong exceeded the government limit, a young child would have to consume about two dozen in a single day to become sick.

The concentrations in some of the Chinese baby milk supply, however, were far higher and caused kidney stones or renal failure in tens of thousands of children.


Click below to read the article;
http://www.iht.com/ar...­
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Click below to read more:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 655
Sorry this posting is late and the deadline has already expired but I am posting this for informational purposes now.
**************************************­*************************
Nov. 24 deadline to file claim related to pet food recall
Posted: 05 Nov 2008 08:23 PM CST

If your cat or dog became ill or died as a result of eating recalled pet food last year, you may be considering filing a claim against the pet food company. If so, you’ll need to do that soon. The deadline for filing the claim form for Americans is November 24; the deadline for Canadians is in January.

The AVMA has posted this reminder.
A U.S. district court has granted final approval of a $24 million settlement to pay economic damages to the owners of cats and dogs that ate pet food subject to last year’s massive recalls.

The recalled pet food contained ingredients from China contaminated with melamine and melamine analogs, which apparently combined to impair renal function in cats and dogs.

Pet owners must file claims by Nov. 24 to receive compensation for economic damages from the settlement fund. The cash fund comes from U.S. and Canadian companies that supplied the ingredients in question or manufactured, distributed, or sold pet food containing the ingredients.

With documentation, consumers can receive up to a 100 percent cash payment of reasonable expenses that resulted from their purchase or their pet’s consumption of the recalled pet food. Consumers also can receive up to $900 for reasonable and valid economic damages for which they do not have documentation.

Valid expenses include food purchases, veterinary care, necropsy costs, the price of cremation or burial, the purchase price or fair market value of a pet that died or of a new pet, and other economic costs.
More information for both Americans and Canadians can be found here.



Click below to for more information:
http://petsitusa.com/...­


A former member
Post #: 664
Are mysterious cat deaths linked to pet food?
Posted: 23 Nov 2008 04:41 PM CST


More than a dozen cats in Australia have become ill, but veterinarians aren’t sure what the cause may be. The only thing in common with the cats is that they all ate Orijen pet food. The pet food company, Champion Petfoods, isn’t sure what the cause of the problem is but they’re looking into it.

UNEXPLAINED chronic illness and death among Sydney cats has been linked to a gourmet imported pet food withdrawn from stores over the past three weeks.

A cat neurologist, Georgina Child, has put down five cats over the past week and treated or consulted with other vets about more than a dozen others suffering from paralysis.

Dr Child, who is based at the University of Sydney’s veterinary hospital and the Small Animal Specialist Hospital in North Ryde, said the only factor that linked all the cats was a specialist pet food called Orijen, which is imported through a Canadian company, Champion Petfoods.

“There is a highly suspicious link because this is an uncommon expensive food in this country at the moment, and not sold in supermarkets,” Dr Child said. “But all tests that have been done so far haven’t given us an answer.”
First symptoms included wobbliness or weakness in the animal’s hind legs, which could then progress to the front limbs. The condition did not appear to be infectious, Dr Child said, nor typical of a nutritional deficiency.

The company is investigating whether irradiation upon entry into Australia was the source of the contamination.

I certainly hope this is an isolated case and Champion Petfoods can find the cause. Along with that hope comes another…that they are responsible enough to be upfront about it and let their customers know. However, the fact that they suspect irradiation when the food was imported seems to open up a whole new set of questions.


Here’s the rest below:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 703
Australian dog food treat recalled
December 9, 2008 at 11:57 pm

The KraMar Pet Company of Australia is recalling KraMar Supa Naturals chicken breast strips because small dogs have become ill after eating the treat. These treats are made in China.

KRAMAR SUPA NATURALS CHICKEN BREAST STRIPS 150G
PRODUCT CODE 85148

KRAMAR SUPA NATURALS CHICKEN BREAST STRIPS 110G
PRODUCT CODE 85149

The KraMar Pet Company Pty Limited has announced a voluntary product withdrawal of its KraMar Supa Naturals chicken breast strips made in China.

KraMar is taking this step as a precaution because of an alleged association between the product and instances of Fanconi-Like Syndrome in small dogs.

The number of cases of illness reported to KraMar is 15, since the product was launched 15 months ago.

KraMar has been in discussions with Dr. Linda Fleeman BVSc PhD MACVSc, Senior Lecturer in Small Animal Medicine from the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney to investigate the issue of some instances of illness in dogs.

To date there has been no scientific evidence to link the product with the development of Fanconi-Like Syndrome.

The KraMar Pet Company had tested every shipment for E-Coli, Salmonella and Melamine. More recently at the request of some veterinary surgeons tests were done for other potential Toxins. The manufacturing facility in China has been approved by the Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS). All tests to date have been clear.

KraMar’s CEO Bryan Fouche has announced that the decision has been made to withdrawal all Supa Naturals chicken breast strips from sale effective immediately.

[…]

The symptoms of Fanconi-like Syndrome are:
• Decreased food consumption, although some may continue to consume the treats to the
exclusion of other foods
• Decreased activity or lethargy
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea, sometimes with blood
• Increased water consumption and/or increased urination

The rest of the release is below:
http://www.kramar.com...­

A former member
Post #: 776
Tainted pet food claims another cat
December 15, 2008 at 9:12 pm

The pet food recall that was in the news day after day last year terrifying pet owners is over, done, and out of the news. The thing is though, it’s not over for some people.

I got an email today from a long-time reader of the blog who wrote to tell me that another reader’s cat died today. My heart sunk when I saw the email come through and read the subject line. Then as I read the email I cried. This was the second cat this person lost as a result of eating tainted pet food. The first one died last year, and the cat that died today suffered with kidney problems until this morning. Both cats should be happy, healthy, and getting into mischief that cats get into. Instead, their people are grieving. It’s just not right that tainted food has killed, and continues to kill, so many pets.

My heart aches for the people who had to say goodbye to their friend today..and to everyone else who is still dealing with the effects of the recall.

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