NORTHERN NEW JERSEY PUG EXTRAVAGANZA! Message Board › INDEX:Updated Lists: Of SAFE PET FOOD, FDA, Itchmo, PetSitUSA Blog, and FOOD

INDEX:Updated Lists: Of SAFE PET FOOD, FDA, Itchmo, PetSitUSA Blog, and FOOD RECALLS~(Please check this thread Daily)

A former member
Post #: 789
Melamine Contamination in China
(Updated: December 18, 2008)


Click below for a copy of the melamine list of contaminated foods:
http://www.fda.gov/oc...­
A former member
Post #: 812
FDA issues warning about jerky treats for dogs
December 19, 2008 at 4:57 pm



The FDA has issued statements about jerky treats for dogs in the past. Here’s a new one just out today a warning about chicken jerky treats made in China…

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken jerky products. The chicken jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

Australian news organizations report the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the chicken jerky product was manufactured in China.

FDA believes the continued trend of consumer complaints coupled with the information obtained from Australia warrants an additional reminder and animal health notification.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.

FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the U.S, is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator http://www.fda.gov/op...­ in their state.

If you’re like a lot of pet owners, you may have gifts for your dogs this Christmas. If so, and if you’re planning to give them jerky treats you may want to think twice.


Click below for more information:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 813
Preliminary Animal Health Notification

December 19, 2008

FDA Continues To Receive Complaints about Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs and Cautions Consumers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken jerky products. The chicken jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

Australian news organizations report the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the chicken jerky product was manufactured in China.

FDA believes the continued trend of consumer complaints coupled with the information obtained from Australia warrants an additional reminder and animal health notification.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be
used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.

FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the U.S, is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator http://www.fda.gov/op...­ in their state.
A former member
Post #: 861
Appeals may delay payments in pet food case
By GEOFF MULVIHILL | Associated Press Writer
2:56 PM EST, December 30, 2008


MOUNT LAUREL, N.J. - More than 23,000 pet owners in the United States have asked for money from a $24 million settlement for owners of dogs and cats who were sickened or died after eating pet food contaminated with an industrial chemical.

U.S. pet owners with claims were set to start receiving checks sometime in 2009, but their payments could be held up even longer while a judge sorts out last-minute appeals to the settlement filed by four people.

The legal snag pits lawyers against lawyers in a complex and emotionally fraught case.

"If one of their objections succeeds, the class comes unraveled," said Kenneth A. Wexler, a Chicago lawyer involved in working out a settlement.

The case began in March 2007, when dogs and cats mysteriously started getting sick. It turned out that the common thread was pet food produced under nearly 200 labels _ much of it by the Menu Foods Income Fund in Streetsville, Ontario.

Most of the food contained Chinese-made wheat gluten laced with melamine, an industrial chemical used to make plastics and fertilizers.

Menu Foods other companies involved in making, distributing and selling the food, agreed to pay pet owners up to $24 million in a deal approved by a judge in October.

The settlement also includes Canadian pet owners, who have until Jan. 27 to file claims.

While the settlement does not compensate owners for pain and suffering associated with the death or illness of their pets, it was structured to pay up to 100 percent for a variety of other costs _ from vet bills to replacing carpet ruined by sick pets.

Pet owners can get up to $900 for undocumented claims _ for example, if they didn't save receipts that showed they bought the contaminated pet food.

A claims administrator will review the claims. If those that are approved add up to more than the amount available to pet owners, the payout to each owner will be reduced. It's not clear yet how long it might take to determine whether the awards would be reduced.

Plaintiffs lawyers have requested more than $6 million from the settlement.

Four pet owners are appealing the case for a variety of reasons.

Two California pet owners say the settlement does not address their concern that the contaminated food was labeled "Made in the USA" though it contained products from China.

Attorney Jeffrey L. Weinstein from Athens, Texas, who is representing two other people, said class action settlements are often rushed through.

"There's this wink-wink agreement, where all of the sudden, everybody's so happy there's this resolution," Weinstein said. "In most of these scenarios, the class members get little or no true value."

In legal filings, plaintiffs lawyers called Weinstein "a professional objector" to class-action settlements who uses the same boilerplate objections repeatedly and said Weinstein's efforts were aimed at helping himself, not the pet owners.

Lawyers for the plaintiffs have asked a judge to make the objectors post bonds _ $12,500 combined for the California pet owners, and $192,500 for Weinstein's clients _ to assure they're serious about their claims before the objections can move ahead.

The judge has asked for legal briefs to help him work through the bond request.


More details below:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 906
Animal rights group in China wants food regulation
January 8, 2009 at 7:12 pm

An animal rights group in China is pushing for pet food regulation in that country. They want food to be routinely tested for contaminants, including melamine.

Taipei, Jan. 8 (CNA) An animal rights group on Thursday called for the government to formulate regulations to ensure the safety of pet food in the wake of the recent deaths of more than 300 dogs due to contaminated food.

Huang Ching-jung, secretary-general of the Animal Protection Association of the Republic of China, told a news conference that test results released by the National Taiwan University (NTU) animal hospital had confirmed an earlier report by the Council of Agriculture (COA) that 200 dogs in a dog shelter in Bali, Taipei County, died last week after eating aflatoxin-contaminated food.

Aflatoxin, which is produced by mold, usually causes liver damage.

Another 100 dogs at the Sanjhih stray dog shelter in Taipei County also died around the same time.

Huang said the association has asked other private institutes to conduct tests and found that the content of the food could reach as high as 630 parts per billion (ppb), noting that if the content is over 60 ppb, it will pose health risks to dogs.

The government should draft a rule to regulate the pet food industry, Huang said, noting that tests on aflatoxin, melamine and pesticide should be part of the regulation.

Everyone should know by now that it’s not just pet food that needs to be tested for contaminants. Although I haven’t kept real close track, it seems like some new human food is being recalled every week because of melamine contamination. This week it’s Topaz Wafer Rolls.

A former member
Post #: 955
Mars Petcare statement on recalled Optima® dog food
January 13, 2009 at 11:44 pm


I just got off the phone with a Doane representative, who gave me the official Mars Petcare statement regarding the Optima® pet food that’s killing dogs in China.

“Mars is aware of the recent reports that dogs in the People’s Republic of China have died as a result of consuming what appeared to be Optima® brand pet food. However, Mars does not sell Optima® branded products in China. We are investigating this situation and our initial findings suggest that the affected pet food was not manufactured by, nor under the authority of, Mars or any of it’s affiliated companies.

Mars only sells Optima® brand products in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Japan but stopped distributing product to the latter two markets nine months ago. Mars does not sell Optima® brand product in any other market around the world.

Consumers can continue to feel confident in the quality of the entire Mars Petcare family of products. As part of our commitment to our loyal consumers and their pets we strive to be at the forefront of product quality and innovation and will continue our investigation into this matter including working closely with FDA and other regulatory authorities who are investigating this situation.”

This certainly does raise some questions. If it wasn’t manufactured by Mars, or any of it’s affiliated companies, one would presume it’s counterfeit. Where did it come from though? CNN Asia is reporting…

Natural Pet Corporation, which is the distributor for Optima dog food from Australia, has ordered a recall, according to Zhang Haobin, the company’s general manager in Shanghai.

Is this counterfeit dog food, or is it indeed Optima® that made its way to the People’s Republic of China in a roundabout (and less than legal) way? Regardless of where it came from, it makes me wonder how many other counterfeit foods are out there. We’ve seen it with toothpaste, medications, and our foods…so why not pet food?


Click below to read more:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 956
Optima: where did it come from?
January 14, 2009 at 3:17 pm


The mysterious case of the killer dog food continues…nobody seems to know where it came from. Last night I blogged an official statement from Mars…it ain’t theirs. Today, there’s news that the folks in China never authorized its importation:

China’s quality watchdog Tuesday denied ever authorizing the import of Optima brand dog food allegedly linked to the deaths of dogs in Chinese cities.

The General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (GAQSIQ) said in a statement that local entry-exit inspection and quarantine units had also never allowed the import of the dog food.

Some media reported the Optima brand dog food was imported from Australia and caused the deaths of dogs in Shanghai and other cities.

Here’s the rest of that story.

So, here’s what we know for sure:

Dogs in China have died of suspected aflatoxin poisoning after eating food that appears to be Optima.
Mars says they don’t sell Optima in China.
China’s quality watchdog says they don’t import Optima.

Hmmm…stay tuned.

And, on another note, melamine is in the news once again. This time saying that melamine alone, without the presence of cyanuric acid, can cause kidney problems.

Scientists in China and Hong Kong have established for the first time in a study that consuming the plastic-making chemical melamine can cause kidney stones in people.

[…]

The experts studied urine samples of 15 mainland Chinese toddlers with kidney stones and compared those taken from 20 children in Hong Kong who also consumed tainted milk but who did not develop stones.

“We proved that melamine alone can cause stones … Our conclusions are that the higher the concentration of melamine in the urine, the bigger the stones,” said Lawrence Lan, associate consultant at the pediatrics surgery department in Hong Kong’s Queen Mary Hospital.

Here’s more below:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 957
PetSmart recalls Grreat Choice® Dog Biscuits
January 20, 2009 at 9:04 pm

If you’ve been paying attention to the news lately about peanut butter, you already know that there’s been a problem with salmonella. Human food has been recalled because of it and now PetSmart is recalling dog treats that contain peanut paste that may be contaminated.

PHOENIX, AZ, January 20, 2009 — PetSmart is voluntarily recalling seven of its Grreat Choice® Dog Biscuit products that contain peanut paste made by Peanut Corporation of America (PCA). PCA is the focus of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigation into potential salmonella contamination of peanut butter and paste made at its Blakely, Georgia facility.

Although PetSmart is not aware of any reported cases of illness related to these products, it has removed these products from its store shelves and website and is conducting the recall as a precautionary measure.

The recalled products include only the following types of Grreat Choice Dog Biscuits sold between Aug. 21, 2008 and Jan. 19, 2009:

Small Assorted 32 oz., UPC 73725702900
Small/Medium Assorted 4 lb., UPC 73725700601
Small/Medium Assorted 8 lb., UPC 73725700605
Small/Medium Assorted 10 lb., UPC 73725702755
Large Assorted 8 lb., UPC 73725700638
Extra Large Assorted 8 lb., UPC 73725700779
Peanut Butter 4 lb., UPC 73725700766

Read more from the FDA or PetSmart.

Read more below:
http://petsitusa.com/...­
A former member
Post #: 968
Natura Announces 100% of Its Ingredients to Come From Non-Chinese Suppliers
21 January 2009
PR Newswire (U.S.)

SAN JOSE, Calif., Jan. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Natura Pet Products, the world's leading manufacturer of healthy pet food, has announced that every wholesome ingredient used in their formulas as of January 5, 2009, will be sourced from trusted non-Chinese suppliers, including supplements which had previously been available only from China.

This announcement pertains to all of Natura's dry, wet and baked pet products.
A former member
Post #: 970
ANIMAL DOCTOR
Dog Owners Are Warned About Chicken Jerky
Animal Doctor
22 January 2009
The Washington Post

The Food and Drug Administration continues to caution consumers about a potential connection between dogs becoming ill and the consumption of chicken jerky products (also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats) imported from China.

The FDA issued a warning in September 2007 but does not have the authority to demand a recall. At least one firm in Australia has recalled its chicken jerky product, and the recall notification said the chicken jerky product was made in China.

Symptoms include decreased activity, vomiting, diarrhea (sometimes with blood) and increased water consumption and urination. Although most dogs seem to recover, some reports indicate that dogs have died from renal failure. The poison has not been identified.

Veterinarians and consumers should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA consumer complaint coordinator, at www.fda.gov/opacom/backgrounders/complai­n.html, in their states.
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