NORTHERN NEW JERSEY PUG EXTRAVAGANZA! Message Board › INDEX: FOODS & PLANTS THAT CAUSE TOXICITY IN DOGS~(Poisonous to your Pets)

INDEX: FOODS & PLANTS THAT CAUSE TOXICITY IN DOGS~(Poisonous to your Pets)

A former member
Post #: 438
Hi again,

With all the crazy food being recalled nowadays, alot more people are starting to cook for their pets. I have been cooking for my pets more and more nowadays. Just be careful that if you do cook for your pets that the ingredients that you use in your recipes aren't toxic to your pets.

Below you will find some very helpful information on what foods and plants are toxic to animals.





Here is a list that I refer back to from time to time on foods that are toxic to your dogs.


Pet Education.com:
http://www.peteducati...­

OR

Vet Info 4 Dogs~Toxic Food to dogs List:
http://www.vetinfo4do...­


Toxic Plants to dogs list:
http://www.aspca.org/...­

Toxic Food and Plants List (Combo):
http://www.entirelype...­





You will be amazed at some of the things that we eat everyday that you will see are very toxic to your furbabies. shock And common houseplants or flowers that are toxic as well. If you do have these plants around, make sure to place them in areas where your pets can't get to them.


Happy Cooking and Safe Planting everyone!!! smile
A former member
Post #: 12
I didn't see it on any of the lists, but I was wondering if anyone knew specifically about dandelions. I know that people eat them, and that dandelion greens are healthy for people, but since spring has sprung, Chewie gobbles up every dandelion flower he sees!
A former member
Post #: 484
Hi Nadine,

Dandelions are not harmful to pets and yes alot of people eat them and put them in a salad as well. I wouldnt let Chewie go to town on them because with the warmer weather now alot of people are putting weed killers all over the weeds which is what dandelions are. SO just be very careful and watch him. They arent harmful at all but they are a diuretic, so Chewie will be urinating alot more than usual.


Here is a list of PLANTS that are NOT TOXIC to pets.

http://www.sniksnak.c...­

A former member
Post #: 598
Top 10 People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your PetsChocolate, Macadamia nuts, avocados?these foods may sound delicious to you, but are actually quite dangerous to our animal companions. Our ASPCA nutrition experts have come up with a list of top 10 people foods that you should not feed your pet. If ingestion of any of these items should occur, please note the amount ingested and contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 immediately.

1. Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine
These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.

2.Alcohol
Alcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death.

3. Avocado
The leaves, fruit, seeds and bark of avocados contain Persin, which can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Birds and rodents are especially sensitive to avocado poisoning, and can develop congestion, difficulty breathing and fluid accumulation around the heart. Some ingestions may even be fatal.

4. Macadamia Nuts
Macadamia nuts are commonly used in many cookies and candies. However, they can cause problems for your canine companion. These nuts have caused weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last approximately 12 to 48 hours.

5. Grapes & Raisins
Although the toxic substance within grapes and raisins is unknown, these fruits can cause kidney failure. In pets who already have certain health problems, signs may be more dramatic.

6. Yeast Dough
Yeast dough can rise and cause gas to accumulate in your pet?s digestive system. This can be painful and can cause the stomach or intestines to rupture. Because the risk diminishes after the dough is cooked and the yeast has fully risen, pets can have small bits of bread as treats. However, these treats should not constitute more than 5 percent to 10 percent of your pet?s daily caloric intake.

7. Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and Bones
Raw meat and raw eggs can contain bacteria such as Salmonella [ital] and E. coli [ital] that can be harmful to pets. In addition, raw eggs contain an enzyme called avidin that decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin), which can lead to skin and coat problems. Feeding your pet raw bones may seem like a natural and healthy option that might occur if your pet lived in the wild. However, this can be very dangerous for a domestic pet, who might choke on bones, or sustain a grave injury should the bone splinter and become lodged in or puncture your pet?s digestive tract.

8. Xylitol
Xylitol is used as a sweetener in many products, including gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. It can cause insulin release in most species, which can lead to liver failure. The increase in insulin leads to hypoglycemia (lowered sugar levels). Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to recumbancy and seizures. Elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days.

9. Onions, Garlic, Chives
These vegetables and herbs can cause gastrointestinal irritation and could lead to red blood cell damage. Although cats are more susceptible, dogs are also at risk if a large enough amount is consumed. Toxicity is normally diagnosed through history, clinical signs and microscopic confirmation of Heinz bodies. An occasional low dose, such as what might be found in pet foods or treats, likely will not cause a problem, but we recommend that you do NOT give your pets large quantities of these foods.

10. Milk
Because pets do not possess significant amounts of lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk), milk and other milk-based products cause them diarrhea or other digestive upset.
A former member
Post #: 62
We all know about raisins being toxic to our dogs but this should drive the point home.
Karen



>> Subject: TOXIC RAISINS please read
>>
>> Written by:
>> Laurinda Morris, DVM
>> Danville Veterinary Clinic
>> Danville , Ohio
>>
>> This week I had the first case in history of raisin toxicity ever seen at MedVet. My patient was a 56-pound, 5 yr old male neutered lab mix that ate half a canister of raisins sometime between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM on Tuesday. He started with vomiting, diarrhea and shaking about 1AM on Wedn esday but the owner didn't call my emergency service until 7AM.
>>
>> I had heard somewhere about raisins AND grapes causing acute Renal failure but hadn't seen any formal paper on the subject. We had her bring the dog in immediately. In the meantime, I called the ER service at MedVet, and the doctor there was like me - had heard something about it, but.... Anyway, we contacted the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center and they said to give IV fluids at 1 ½ times maintenance and watch the kidney values for the next 48-72 hours.
>>
>> The dog's BUN (blood urea nitrogen level) was already at 32 (normal less than 27) and creatinine over 5 (1.9 is the high end of normal). Both are monitors of kidney
>> function in the bloodstream. We placed an IV catheter and started the fluids. Rechecked the renal values at 5 PM and the BUN was over 40 and creatinine over 7 with no urine production after a liter of fluids. At the point I felt the dog was in acute renal failure and sent him on to MedVet for a urinary catheter to monitor urine output overnight as well as overnight care.
>>
>> He started vomiting again overnight at MedVet and his renal values have continued to incr ease daily. He produced urine when given lasix as a diuretic. He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and they still couldn't control his vomiting. Today his urine output decreased again, his BUN was over 120, his creatinine was at 10, his phosphorus was very elevated and his blood pressure, which had been staying around 150, skyrocketed to 220.. He continued to vomit and the owners elected to
>> euthanize.
>>
>> This is a very sad case - great dog, great owners who had no idea raisins could be a toxin. Please alert everyone you know who has a dog of this very serious risk. Poison control said as few as 7 raisins or grapes could be toxic. Many people I know give their dogs grapes or raisins as treats including our ex-handler's. Any exposure should give rise to immediate concern.
>>
>> Laurinda Morris, DVM
>> Danville Veterinary Clinic
>> Danville , Ohio
>>
A former member
Post #: 980
Dangerous HUMAN Foods: Are They Harmful to Your Dog?


Click below to see the list of Dangerous FOODS:

http://www.petplace.c...­
A former member
Post #: 1,457
Hello everyone,

With the Holidays rapidly approaching, and more and more people receiving flower/plant deliveries for the Holidays, I figured it would be a great time to put the updated TOXIC plants list up on the boards again. Please make sure to keep all plants out of your pets reach.


Here is a list of ALL the TOXIC plants that are harmful to your pets:

ASPCA Toxic Plant List:
http://www.aspca.org/...­






What to do if your pet is poisoned:
http://www.aspca.org/...­






Ten Most Common Poisonous

Plants Marijuana
Ingestion of Cannabis sativa by companion animals can result in depression of the central nervous system and incoordination, as well as vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, increased heart rate, and even seizures and coma.

Sago Palm
All parts of Cycas Revoluta are poisonous, but the seeds or ?nuts? contain the largest amount of toxin. The ingestion of just one or two seeds can result in very serious effects, which include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures and liver failure.

Lilies
Members of the Lilium spp. are considered to be highly toxic to cats. While the poisonous component has not yet been identified, it is clear that with even ingestions of very small amounts of the plant, severe kidney damage could result.

Tulip/Narcissus bulbs
The bulb portions of Tulipa/Narcissus spp. contain toxins that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation, drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions and cardiac abnormalities.

Azalea/Rhododendron
Members of the Rhododenron spp. contain substances known as grayantoxins, which can produce vomiting, drooling, diarrhea, weakness and depression of the central nervous system in animals. Severe azalea poisoning could ultimately lead to coma and death from cardiovascular collapse.

Oleander
All parts of Nerium oleander are considered to be toxic, as they contain cardiac glycosides that have the potential to cause serious effects?including gastrointestinal tract irritation, abnormal heart function, hypothermia and even death.

Castor Bean
The poisonous principle in Ricinus communis is ricin, a highly toxic protein that can produce severe abdominal pain, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, weakness and loss of appetite. Severe cases of poisoning can result in dehydration, muscle twitching, tremors, seizures, coma and death.

Cyclamen
Cylamen species contain cyclamine, but the highest concentration of this toxic component is typically located in the root portion of the plant. If consumed, Cylamen can produce significant gastrointestinal irritation, including intense vomiting. Fatalities have also been reported in some cases.

Kalanchoe
This plant contains components that can produce gastrointestinal irritation, as well as those that are toxic to the heart, and can seriously affect cardiac rhythm and rate.

Yew
Taxus spp. contains a toxic component known as taxine, which causes central nervous system effects such as trembling, incoordination, and difficulty breathing. It can also cause significant gastrointestinal irritation and cardiac failure, which can result in death.




Have a Happy and Safe Holiday.
A former member
Post #: 1,916
I heard a terrible story the other day. I went out to dinner with a friend that lost a dog to carbon monoxide toxicity. They have a cabin that they go to with their dogs. When they arrived at the cabin, it was freezing cold so they turned on several space heaters (that weren't vented). They left the dogs in the cabin and went in to town to get some groceries and supplies. Then they had lunch, met a few friends and returned to the cabin several hours later to find their one dog...dead and the other dog was weak and obviously sick.

So today, I want to talk to you about a real possible threat in your home. I don't want this to happen to you.

Carbon monoxide may be a real danger in your home and can harm you and poison your pets. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless poisonous gas. When present, this gas is absorbed into the bloodstream and forms a compound that causes a reduced oxygen supply to the heart and brain.

The most common cause of carbon monoxide toxicity is a non-vented or poorly ventilated furnace, gas water heater, gas/kerosene space heater in your home or faulty exhaust systems. It can also be caused by an automobile exhaust in a closed garage, smoke inhalation (for example, in burning buildings) and airplane cargo areas.

Common signs include drowsiness, lethargy, weakness and/or incoordination, bright red color to the skin and gums, difficulty breathing, coma and sudden death. Occasionally, chronic (low-grade, long-term) exposure may cause exercise intolerance, changes in gait (walking), and disturbances of normal reflexes.

When my friend got back to the cabin ? he was devastated. He took the dogs to the local veterinarian. The one dog made it with treatment and is doing well. My friend is still shocked and asked me to tell you this story, hoping it saves someone's pet.

Prevent toxicity by minimizing exposure and using carbon monoxide detectors around your home. Ensure your furnace or space heaters are well-ventilated. Carbon monoxide detectors are available in most home improvement stores and are also available as co-monitors with smoke detectors.

Buy one and protect yourself, your family and your pets.

Until next time,

Dr. Jon

P.S. Unexpected emergencies, like carbon monoxide toxicity, can occur. Make sure you can care for your dog in the case of a medial emergency.
A former member
Post #: 2,371
BRUNFELSIA PLANT PROVES LIFE-THREATENING TO DOGS

According to a recently published study by Dr. Safdar Khan, veterinary toxicologist for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), dogs seem to be particularly attracted to the seeds and berries of the Brunfelsia plant, commonly known as ?morning, noon and night? and ?yesterday, today and tomorrow.? In fact, canines are most susceptible to poisoning by this gardener?s favorite, aptly named for its fragrant flowers that bloom in vivid purple and gradually change to lavender before fading to white.

From 2001 to 2006, the APCC treated 38 cases of Brunfelsia poisoning involving 42 dogs. One California hound experienced stiff limbs and excessive drooling after ingesting several seeds from the plant. A terrier puppy from Florida developed life-threatening seizures after consuming another part of the plant. With help from the APCC and the services of a local emergency veterinarian, the puppy eventually made a full recovery. However, three of the cases proved fatal.

?Brunfelsia toxicity can progress very rapidly to a potentially lethal situation, so it?s critical that pet parents seek immediate veterinary care,? says Dr. Khan. ?If pets consume any part of the plant, they can become ill within hours and develop gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting and diarrhea, as well as tremors, seizures and muscle rigidity that makes the animal appear to be in a ?sawhorse? stance.?

The most commonly affected breeds are Labradors and golden retrievers, who, because they tend to be very active, may be more likely to get to the plant?s seeds and leaves.

If you have Brunfelsia in your home, please keep the plant in an area where pets can?t reach it, or replace it with a nontoxic alternative. Pet parents should remember to take precautions against the many plants and flowers that can prove harmful to their animals.

You can learn to recognize dangerous flora by watching our new video, featuring 17 common poisonous plants, at APCC online.


Click below for article:
http://www.aspca.org/...­
A former member
Post #: 2,372
ANIMAL POISON CONTROL CENTER~17 Common Poisonous Plants


Watch the video first:
http://www.youtube.co...­









Lilies
Members of the Lilium spp. are considered to be highly toxic to cats. While the poisonous component has not yet been identified, it is clear that with even ingestions of very small amounts of the plant, severe kidney damage could result.

Marijuana
Ingestion of Cannabis sativa by companion animals can result in depression of the central nervous system and incoordination, as well as vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, increased heart rate, and even seizures and coma.

Sago Palm
All parts of Cycas Revoluta are poisonous, but the seeds or ?nuts? contain the largest amount of toxin. The ingestion of just one or two seeds can result in very serious effects, which include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures and liver failure.

Tulip/Narcissus bulbs
The bulb portions of Tulipa/Narcissus spp. contain toxins that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation, drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions and cardiac abnormalities.

Azalea/Rhododendron
Members of the Rhododenron spp. contain substances known as grayantoxins, which can produce vomiting, drooling, diarrhea, weakness and depression of the central nervous system in animals. Severe azalea poisoning could ultimately lead to coma and death from cardiovascular collapse.

Oleander
All parts of Nerium oleander are considered to be toxic, as they contain cardiac glycosides that have the potential to cause serious effects?including gastrointestinal tract irritation, abnormal heart function, hypothermia and even death.

Castor Bean
The poisonous principle in Ricinus communis is ricin, a highly toxic protein that can produce severe abdominal pain, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, weakness and loss of appetite. Severe cases of poisoning can result in dehydration, muscle twitching, tremors, seizures, coma and death.

Cyclamen
Cylamen species contain cyclamine, but the highest concentration of this toxic component is typically located in the root portion of the plant. If consumed, Cylamen can produce significant gastrointestinal irritation, including intense vomiting. Fatalities have also been reported in some cases.

Kalanchoe
This plant contains components that can produce gastrointestinal irritation, as well as those that are toxic to the heart, and can seriously affect cardiac rhythm and rate.

Yew
Taxus spp. contains a toxic component known as taxine, which causes central nervous system effects such as trembling, incoordination, and difficulty breathing. It can also cause significant gastrointestinal irritation and cardiac failure, which can result in death.

Amaryllis
Common garden plants popular around Easter, Amaryllis species contain toxins that can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia and tremors.
Autumn Crocus
Ingestion of Colchicum autumnale by pets can result in oral irritation, bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ damage and bone marrow suppression.

Chrysanthemum
These popular blooms are part of the Compositae family, which contain pyrethrins that may produce gastrointestinal upset, including drooling, vomiting and diarrhea, if eaten. In certain cases depression and loss of coordination may also develop if enough of any part of the plant is consumed.

English Ivy
Also called branching ivy, glacier ivy, needlepoint ivy, sweetheart ivy and California ivy, Hedera helix contains triterpenoid saponins that, should pets ingest, can result in vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation and diarrhea.

Peace Lily (AKA Mauna Loa Peace Lily)
Spathiphyllum contains calcium oxalate crystals that can cause oral irritation, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty in swallowing and intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips and tongue in pets who ingest.

Pothos
Pothos (both Scindapsus and Epipremnum) belongs to the Araceae family. If chewed or ingested, this popular household plant can cause significant mechanical irritation and swelling of the oral tissues and other parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

Schefflera
Schefflera and Brassaia actinophylla contain calcium oxalate crystals that can cause oral irritation, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty in swallowing and intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips and tongue in pets who ingest.



ASPCA website:
http://www.aspca.org/...­

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