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Novel Lovers of Sonoma County, CA Message Board › Suggestions for upcoming books

Suggestions for upcoming books

Joan P.
JoanPrice
Group Organizer
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 103
These books were suggested at our June meeting (titles link to Amazon):

The Imperfectionists (I mentioned this in an earlier message in this thread.)

Requiem (which author? There are several books by this name)

Hikikomori and the Rental Sister

Palace Walk (Please see Jesse's separate thread on other books by Naguib Mahfouz.)

Mary Coin (paperback won't be available until end of Feb. 2014)

Autobiography of God
Crystal O.
user 13860811
Santa Rosa, CA
Post #: 6
I have had the Imperfectionists for quite a while - it would be a good excuse to finally get to it!
Anything by Mahfouz is okay by me!!

Joan P.
JoanPrice
Group Organizer
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 105
Eeeuuww, I'm halfway through The Imperfectionists, don't like or care about any of the characters, don't care if I finish it. I officially withdraw my suggestion that we read it for our book club. I cannot understand why the NYT raved about it.
Janine
user 14867751
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 40
Eeeuuww, I'm halfway through The Imperfectionists, don't like or care about any of the characters, don't care if I finish it. I officially withdraw my suggestion that we read it for our book club. I cannot understand why the NYT raved about it.
Same here, Joan. I didn't finish it. I just did not care for it. I picked up When Will There be Good News by Kate Atkinson and could not put it down. I read an interesting interview with her where she wondered why in the US we seemed so preoccupied with genre, while in the UK the focus is more on the quality of the writing.
Well, whatever you are reading, and whatever you are enjoying, I hope you are all having a lovely summer!
Jeanne Deabenderfe...
user 31276712
Santa Rosa, CA
Post #: 2
I know this suggestion will be "out of the box" as it is strictly a fun beachy summer read but nevertheless, I propose, "a Dirty Job" by Christopher Moore - not literary but one of the funniest books I have ever read. Publishers Weekly: " a wonderful wacked out year... Moore's enthusiasm and skill make it convincing, and his affection for the cast of weirdos give the book an unexpected poignancy." Library Journal (starred review): Moore is superb in this mock epic of death and love. Smart people will be enormously amused."
Synopsis: Charlie Asher is a pretty normal guy with a normal life, married to a bright and pretty woman who actually loves him for his normalcy. They're even about to have their first child. Yes, Charlie's doing okay -- until people start dropping dead around him, and everywhere he goes a dark presence whispers to him from under the streets. Charlie Asher, it seems, has been recruited for a new position: as Death. It's a dirty job. But hey! somebody's got to do it!
A former member
Post #: 41
Here's one I'm interested in, as a Winter read:
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
http://www.guardian.c...­
Janine
user 14867751
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 41
Thanks for the suggestions, fellow readers. I've just started Heft by Liz Moore:
From Booklist
*Starred Review* Moore’s endearing novel, following The Words of Every Song (2007), looks at the lives of two solitary characters learning to acknowledge and accept their troubled realities of family and providence. Fifty-eight-year-old Arthur Opp, a college professor turned morbidly obese recluse, lives in a dilapidated house in Brooklyn, where his only human connection is through correspondence with a former student, the vulnerable and lonesome Charlene. When Charlene unexpectedly contacts Arthur with the news that she is the mother of a teenage son, Kel, Arthur is compelled to reflect upon and refocus his life, tenuously striking up a friendship with his young cleaning woman. Meanwhile, Kel is a gifted high-school athlete who depends on his physical prowess to navigate his interpersonal relationships. Kel’s dream of becoming a professional athlete is well within reach, yet his ambition is confounded by his mother’s alcoholism. When Charlene attempts suicide, Kel is left to forge a life of his own. As the book shifts between the perspectives of Arthur and Kel, Charlene’s connection to the two characters reveals surprising junctures along the way. --Leah Strauss --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
Review
“A suspenseful, restorative novel from one of our fine young voices.” (Colum McCann)
Joan P.
JoanPrice
Group Organizer
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 106
Here's another suggestion: My Education by Susan Choi. Amazon link here. Although the paperback is not yet officially available, it's being offered inexpensively by third party sellers.

See the 7/19 NYT review here.

Book description from Amazon:

Regina Gottlieb had been warned about Professor Nicholas Brodeur long before arriving as a graduate student at his prestigious university high on a pastoral hill. He’s said to lie in the dark in his office while undergraduate women read couplets to him. He’s condemned on the walls of the women’s restroom, and enjoys films by Roman Polanski. But no one has warned Regina about his exceptional physical beauty—or his charismatic, volatile wife.

My Education is the story of Regina’s mistakes, which only begin in the bedroom, and end—if they do—fifteen years in the future and thousands of miles away. By turns erotic and completely catastrophic, Regina’s misadventures demonstrate what can happen when the chasm between desire and duty is too wide to bridge.





Joan P.
JoanPrice
Group Organizer
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 107
Although Shawna hasn't posted here, she offered us her home for our August meeting, and she'd like to read NW and The Art of Hearing Heartbeats. Since NW isn't available in paperback until the end of August, let's read The Art of Hearing Heartbeats by Jan-Philipp Sendker, which has been recommended in the past, in August. (See? If you offer to host, you get special privileges, like the deciding vote in our book choice.)

Here's the Amazon link. The ebook is priced at only $8.99 on both iTunes and Kindle at the moment.

Publisher's book description:

A poignant and inspirational love story set in Burma, The Art of Hearing Heartbeats spans the decades between the 1950s and the present. When a successful New York lawyer suddenly disappears without a trace, neither his wife nor his daughter Julia has any idea where he might be…until they find a love letter he wrote many years ago, to a Burmese woman they have never heard of. Intent on solving the mystery and coming to terms with her father’s past, Julia decides to travel to the village where the woman lived. There she uncovers a tale of unimaginable hardship, resilience, and passion that will reaffirm the reader’s belief in the power of love to move mountains.

Who's interested in NW for September?
Joan P.
JoanPrice
Group Organizer
Sebastopol, CA
Post #: 111
Run by Ann Patchett is another book I've enjoyed lately that has plenty to discuss. I know we read another Patchett book -- Bel Canto -- but she's good enough to read more than one of her books!
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