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Ockham's Cafe: Wednesdays in Cordova

  • Jun 19, 2013 · 6:30 PM
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One Fix Wonder: Assuming you believe that American government is broken (or politically bankrupt), what is one and only one change that would have the greatest impact for correcting American society?

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  • Charles B.

    good discussion again

    1 · June 20, 2013

  • Jason

    My one solution would be to get rid of the institutionalized strategies implemented during the 1990's to foster--intentional or unintentionally--divisiveness amongst the political parties. Foer example, end the segregation in Congress that occurred during this period: segregated dining, segregated "water fountains," and so forth.

    June 19, 2013

    • David

      Water fountains? Really? I agree that the current situation is unhealthy, but it's also not 'enforced'. Moderates can work together if they so choose. I'd say this isn't segregation per se, it's more a manifestation of social polarization, which is the true culprit.

      June 19, 2013

    • Jason

      Yes, it is voluntary segregation. The "water fountain" (in quotes) was a reference to separate Democrat versus Republican water stations on the congressional floor. Democrats and Republicans used to drink and eat together...now that kind of informal mingling is only read about in history books.

      June 19, 2013

  • Jason

    If I remember correctly, the Founding Fathers had a far more libertarian ideal than is espoused today. Federal government was supposed to do very little and the Constitution was primarily about limiting the Federal government's power and role in civilian life and to a lesser degree limit its power over state governments--not expand it. Remember that England (a Federal government for the colonies) wasn't so nice. Now US citizens look toward government to solve all kinds of problems: jobs, healthcare, disaster relief, etc. Are the Founding Fathers still relevant?

    June 19, 2013

    • David

      Times have changed. The so called 'Constitutionalists­' would argue otherwise. However, the constitution evolves because it's a living breathing document... exactly as the founding fathers wanted it to be.

      June 19, 2013

  • Jim

    Repentance and spiritual revival. :)

    June 18, 2013

    • Dan L.

      Surely you are not suggesting a theocracy?

      June 19, 2013

  • David

    I can think of a number of changes that will produce an almost immediate benefit, but they are all modest. Conversely, I can think of others that are likely to be more significant, but they are longer term. Way too late for those that put a new policy into effect to claim credit. The unfortunate truth is, that the best changes will be of no benefit to the administration in power. Consequently, their motivation to enact it is low.

    June 19, 2013

  • Tennessee I.

    What may fix US gov't may not fix US society.

    June 18, 2013

    • David

      Well, the purpose of government is to serve society. What does it mean to 'fix' government anyway; it's to make government serve society more effectively. Sure, society will always fall far short of perfection, and problems will persist. Nevertheless, a 'fixed' government will yield some measure of relief in society, and that's all one can reasonably expect.

      June 19, 2013

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