Inspect Privacy on Tuesday, update

From: Jeff G
Sent on: Thursday, March 8, 2012 12:03 PM

Okay, so maybe pride is a sin, but I am exceedingly proud of the game I have come up with for our meeting!  It will be more than fun:  it will give a boost to our whole discussion.  Please be on time so we can "deal" fairly.

Here's what you need to bring:
    FIVE examples of human activity where privacy is an issue:  where somebody wants to know what someone else wants to remain unknown.  If you can write these on 3"x5" WHITE INDEX CARDS beforehand, that would be great, though I will supply them at the meeting.  For example, you could write "unmanned aerial surveillance reveals you have unlicensed pets."  Being somewhat specific will help distinguish this case from "you see your neighbor sunbathing through the fence."  If the scenario is gender-specific, allow that anyone might receive this card.  The best cards for the game and the discussion will be gray areas and personal:  "you tell an acquaintance you saw her/his husband/wife having lunch with another woman/man."  Outright crimes (e.g., murder) are disallowed.  The case may apply only to certain persons (e.g., "a candidate for public office") but the person receiving the card will be deemed to be such a person.

Here's how the game works.  Each index card specifies a "you" that is either (a) someone whose privacy may have been violated, or (b) someone who may have violated another's privacy.  When a card is revealed, the group decides whether privacy has been violated.  In case (a), the player must argue that his privacy should have been respected; in case (b), the one who played the card must argue that privacy was not violated.

Besides the precedent set by disposed privacy cards, the group may adopt resolutions to guide future decisions.  It is expected that people will be motivated to approve resolutions that promote a favorable dispensation of their own privacy cards:-)

Set-up:  Each person brings 5 cards as described above.  They must discard at least 2 of those (but all 5 if they want) into a common pile, which is shuffled.  Then they draw cards from the pile until they have a full hand again.

On your turn:  You choose from two options:
    REVEAL.  You expose one card, of your choice, which triggers a discussion by all to determine whether that matter should be considered private.  A secret vote is taken, majority rules.  In case (a), if the matter is determined to be private, you are "forgiven" (and one step closer to winning); if it is judged to be public, then you are "ostracized" (i.e., you lose); in case (b), vice versa.  (But you can continue to participate.)
    PROPOSE a resolution.  You write a sentence on an index card and ask the group to vote on it publicly, which happens after a discussion.  If the majority approves the resolution, then it can be cited with authority, by anyone, whether they voted for it or not, in the discussion of a "reveal" or of another proposal.

The winner is the first to reveal all his cards and be forgiven.  But actually, we all win...
    - if we are spurred to become more involved in our positions,
    - when we stretch our minds to accommodate what chance has dealt us, and
    - if we actively listen to others in order to give a response.

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