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Ryan M.
RyanMurphyPhoto
Madison, WI
Post #: 2
Beth M.
mcbeth
Madison, WI
Post #: 11
One of the fellas I work with has used the Brenizer Method to create some really lovely images, like this one:
http://www.flickr.com...­

Any idea how much chug you can get out of a healthy (though not robust) computer when it comes to combining the howevermany many images? Better to use jpg format versus raw?

Adam C.
user 13806225
Lake Mills, WI
Post #: 78
From what I've read it is best to use JPEG output, with whatever the smallest resolution files your camera will put out.

Your combining enough files, that even if you are getting 5mp files from the camera, the final composite will be larger than the standard output of your camera.
A former member
Post #: 2
Hey, I just saw a link from here in my flickr stats and thought I should finally sign up. I always use lower res tiffs. Any computer will be just with them and you don't deal with jpeg compression. I correct lens distortion and chromatic aberrations in Lightroom and use an export preset for pano stitching that downsizes the longest edge to 2048 pixels. Then take them into photoshop or autopano giga to stitch them together. Never change your camera setting to a smaller resolution as you will never be able to make a higher res version. You can always downsize but you can't get more pixels back.
A former member
Post #: 1
Thank you! Hopefully I will get to try this out soon!
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