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A former member
Post #: 408
I know that I mentioned the concept in the past, and was shutdown for doing so previously, however I am obliged to try again, this time with a wider approach: non zero sum game theory
A former member
Post #: 413
For some reason monetary policy interests me. Don't know why, the public education system never even mentioned it, but then again, maybe that is another reason to be fascinated by its history. The following is only slightly lengthy, but that should not stop this set. Here is Suo Marte's review of the first volume of "A History of the Federal Reserve": More Proof Central Planning Does Not Work
A former member
Post #: 414
I support a mixed economy over socialism — albeit with quite progressively liberal fiscal and social government policies. I think measures to ensure equality of opportunity and meritocracy as much as possible are crucially important.
Regarding meritocracy: the classic argument appears to be that socialism has already won. It exists among the rich, and myth of meritocracy is the result.
Ben Forbes G.
Epicurean306
Kissimmee, FL
Post #: 254
Zero-sum games in economics, as well as negative externalities such as the tragedy of the commons, tend to happen when markets or resources are limited (and scarcity is fundamental to the reality of most economic systems)... To pretty much completely surpass the problem of scarcity (e.g. with a Star Trek level of technology, for example), would be to create a utopia where all basic needs could be effortlessly provided for...

Anyway, bailing out banks we foolishly allowed to get "too big to fail" while the poor continue to suffer isn't really true socialism (it's merely unfairly privatizing profits and socializing losses). Outside of Republican hyperbole/delusion, socialism has not "won" in the United States, though there are certainly varying degrees of genuine democratic socialism in Europe (with varying degrees of successful implementation).

Anyway, meritocracy is not a "myth" — but the problem is that opportunities tend to be unfairly unequal for a variety of well understood reasons; nevertheless, the idea of specialization and incentives has to be at the core of any successful modern economic system... To put it in simple terms, a society could try to minimize meritocracy with very bad results: e.g. pay everyone equally for every job, or nearly so, and see corruption, bribes, inefficiencies, crime, etc. skyrocket (or we could all just regressively become subsistence farmers). The reality is that markets are very good at certain things, many of which we greatly enjoy and take for granted the benefits of, though I would definitely be the first to agree that markets need to be sensibly regulated. A classic example of why meritocracy is warranted is a profession like medicine: it requires years of schooling and training to master its knowledge and skills, is obviously and indisputably exceptionally valuable, and deserves luxurious compensation for the efforts of those who pursue it. Another example would be skilled business managers earning more than unskilled laborers (though I don't think they should be earning hundreds of times more or getting bonuses for failure, and I think even the most unskilled full-time labor deserves a living wage). Anyway, the key to true meritocracy is to insure that prestigious, important, or highly skilled jobs go to those who earn and deserve them: i.e. to the best and the brightest (and that students have as much equal opportunity as possible: meaning more equality in public-school funding and more state-subsidized higher education). "Blind" admissions and application/hiring processes whenever possible can also be helpful in minimizing nepotism and other problems (such as racism, sexism, etc.). In a more socialist society with a mixed economy, it's considered important that government does all that it can to equalize opportunities (especially opportunities for social-mobility) and keep the gap between rich and poor reasonable (rather than expanding) so that standards of living and general prosperity can rise for all. biggrin
A former member
Post #: 417
Why scarcity?
A former member
Post #: 418
So I am not a green anarchist (whatever that means), however I do think Murray Bookckin, in his talk about Ecology Ideology is worth the listen.
A former member
Post #: 424
christopher
user 11174629
Casselberry, FL
Post #: 123
Zero-sum games in economics, as well as negative externalities such as the tragedy of the commons, tend to happen when markets or resources are limited (and scarcity is fundamental to the reality of most economic systems)... To pretty much completely surpass the problem of scarcity (e.g. with a Star Trek level of technology, for example), would be to create a utopia where all basic needs could be effortlessly provided for...
Why scarcity?
Because as Ben said:
...resources are limited...
Everything is a trade off. Devoting more resources to airplanes means taking those resources away from microchips.
A former member
Post #: 14
As a Scandinavian, I'd just like to point out this is all good, however not only do people pay higher taxes, the universities are all public. And the university's goal is not to take in as many who wish to become educated (or get paid the stipend) but to take in as many qualified students as can be employed in that profession. In other words, there is a lot of competition to get into anthropology bc few people get employed as anthropologists. In the US, we say WTF, nobody is gonna tell us that we can't study something. Instead, we get into loads of debt, graduate not being able to find a job, and then complain.

Jairo M.
JamyangPawo
Winter Park, FL
Post #: 1,493
That's why among the happiest people (or nation?) in the world is Denmark (a Scandanavian country). And I should unwittingly admit that I am yet another ignorant greedy angry American who has fallen prey to this system here described in the tough truths revealed by the Silhouette Man thankfully submitted by our kind Scandinavian member. My student loan debt is only over a hundred grand. I am ungainfully under-employed, but kind brothers and sisters keep me busy, and they are struggling to keep their business from going bankrupt.

Hey something like the sad state of this system would make a great topic for our next meetup, don't you think? Anyone reading? Or is everybody in Platoscave meetup mesmerized by the shadows dancing on the cave walls? Oh I forget, some folks here are afraid of being watched by Big Brother or something. Well, do you see the link just below this message and to the left which says "Add a reply"? Click on that and write your questions or comments. Thanks.
Namaste,
Jairo jairosoft Moreno
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