A former member
Post #: 108
Port City is also a good place to learn. Peter and Percy are willing to teach about bikes if you want to learn, and they sell parts/tools. And thank you John for the info on hubs, cranks and headsets.
john b.
AsshatOrganizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 182
I know most of you are not programmers. Don't know why I felt it prudent to make that generalization.
It seems like forever ago but, I learned all of my beginner stuff from Percy by just hanging out in The Bike Cycle, Percy's Cycle and later in the shop garage "playhouse" on his property. Aside from being very knowledgeable and an accomplished wheelwright he's just an all around nice guy. It's hard to find someone as talented as he is who is also willing to teach. The concept of a for-profit bike shop teaching bicycle repair (outside of flat tire repair clinics, at least) flies in the face of many shop's strategies for staying alive. It's true, very low overhead is to be had (even for the shops that seemingly gouge) and business is pretty dismal for any of our town's 6 bike shops. And most of those other shops DO have to pay for heat, as well as steep rent and a whole host of other bills while keeping numbers up so they aren't dropped by a manufacturer or dealer. I once thought I could venture into slicing my own piece of the pie in the bike shop game. Now I say, "no thank you."
Also, I never said anything about cranks, I was touching on different kinds of bottom brackets.
A former member
Post #: 788
I just took a good look at my filthy drive train this morning. Riding through the snow/sand/salt-slushy-coctail daily, has encrusted my bottom bracket and drive train in a congealed cacoon.

I for one, see a strip-down, rebuild come springtime. I'll change out the department-store quality, stamped crank-arm and chainring for a higher-quality set.
Wally
WallyE
Saco, ME
Post #: 11
... has encrusted my bottom bracket and drive train in a congealed cacoon.

Mine's been like that too, EVERY day this week sad Requires a wipe down after each ride.
The fork mount on the front fender was on the front of the fork. I moved it to the backside, which lowered the mudflap a few degrees. It minimized the crud build-up, but not all of it. I’m considering making longer flaps or getting a Planet Bike Grunge Board





A former member
Post #: 789
...Requires a wipe down after each ride.

Oh, that might help! confused I forget who was president the last time I wiped it down biggrin
John B.
JohnB38
Westbrook, ME
Post #: 1,744
I too just sadly noted my chain yesterday, which was brand new a few weeks ago and is now looking pretty rusty already. I never get around to wiping it down each night, which I know is bad. This weekend I'll clean and lube it, I promise!

This is exactly why I wanted an internal hub winter bike. At least I'm only ruining the chain with negligence. What I should really do is get is a full chainguard! (Don't know if that's even an option for this bike.)

On the positive side, I had Bruce install a new gear cable and "wet weather cassette joint" a few weeks ago, and have had absolutely no problems with cable freeze since then, even in the sub-zero temps this week. love struck Obviously the new cable is the primary reason for that so far, but hopefully the new cassette joint will also help protect it going into the future.
Wally
WallyE
Saco, ME
Post #: 12
...Get is a full chainguard! (Don't know if that's even an option for this bike.)

John,

Hebie seems to have a good range of aftermarket chainguards. Unsure of US distributors. Bruce should be able to find one.
john b.
AsshatOrganizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 197
Also note that the above chainguards glide on the chain itself, further adding to the already considerable friction in a chain made of pins, plates and bushings. A fully enclosed chaincase such as those found on "dutch bicycles" is a very over-involved way to combat chain corrosion. In fact all chaincases are in no way fully enclosed. They do indeed let water in and the chain is still susceptible to environmental conditions (especially low temperatures). Add that to the fact it makes servicing the bike that much more unapproachable and you've got one expensive, heavy, useless add-on to your bike.
You can use almost any cheap bicycle chain in conjunction with an internally geared bike. I use a $7 Izumi chain designed for single speed applications. Any chain is "pre-lubed" but this is mostly for packaging reasons as a preservative measure. I clean away the packaging lube with Tri-flow degreaser and regrease with either a thin coating of Tri-flow lubricant in the summer or a liberal amount of wax type chain grease (White Lightning or Pedro's Ice Wax) in the winter. And please, for the aspiring do-it-yourselfers: Never ever use WD-40!
Chains will rust in the winter, period. You can combat this by applying the opposite mantra of summer chain maintenance: the more lube the better. A chain that is jet black with grime is far more useful than a chain that is corroded to the point of creaking. After a sloppy commute there is no need to wipe a chain down that is heavily laden with grease as water will not adhere to it. Layering on the grease is the easiest and laziest way to maintain your drivetrain for the winter. In the summer, however, a heavily greased chain will pick up dry road detritus, grind the snot out of your drivetrain and significantly limit the life of all components therein.
The important bit: a rusted chain can and will fail. I've broken several during my first couple of years commuting year-round. Chaincases are unnecessary (unless you require commuting to work in the guise of a male model, which the photogenic Dutch appear to). Grease is cheap and so are most chains.
Wally
WallyE
Saco, ME
Post #: 13
chainguards glide on the chain itself
Oh, it doessad

Belt drive then wink

My chain is up for replacement this week-end.



A former member
Post #: 790
I have used this method before with great success. I have been a little lazy this year, but this is the plan for my chain this weekend. I'll also make an effort to clean some of the coral-reef buildup off some of the components.
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy